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Full text of "Town Report"

LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY, MASS. 



3 4864 00275 4777 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



For the Year 1915 



ALSO THE 



Reports of the School and other Committees 



FOR THE YEAR 1915 




BOSTON: 

GEO. E. CROSBY CO., PRINTERS 

394 Atlantic Avenue 

1916 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 

For the Year 1915 



ALSO THE 



Reports of the School and other Committees 



FOR THE YEAR 1915 




BOSTON: 

GEO. E. CROSBY CO., PRINTERS 

394 Atlantic Avenue 

1916 



Town Officers, 1915-1916 



Town Clerk. 
*GEORGE L. CHAPIN. 
ARTHUR F. CHAPIN. 

Selectmen and Overseers of the Poor. 
CHARLES S. SMITH. 

JOHN F. FARRAR, ROBERT D. DONALDSON. 

Board of Health. 

J. T. LAIRD Term expires 1918 

MARTIN M. WELCH " 1916 

*EDWORDS W. HERMAN " " 1917 

R. D. DONALDSON to fill vacancy. 

Assessors. 

CHARLES S. WHEELER Term expires 1918 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE " " 1916 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN •• " 1917 

Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 
CHARLES S. WHEELER. 

Auditor. 
JAMES W. LENNON. 



JAMES T. LAIRD, 



Constables. 

GEORGE E. CUNNINGHAM. 



Commissioners of Trust Funds. 

CHARLES S. SMITH Term expires 1918 

C. LEE TODD " " 1916 

JULIUS E. EVELETH " " 1917 

*Resigned November 1915. 



4 



Tree Warden 
JOHN J. KELLIHER. 

Committee on Claims. 
MOORFIELD STOREY, JULIUS E. EVELETH, 

CHARLES S. WHEELER. 

Trustees for Bemis Fund for Free Public Lectures. 

EDWARD F. FLINT Term expires 1918 

C. LEE TODD " " 1916 

JULIUS E. EVELETH ,. " " 1917 

Trustees of Grammar School Fund. 
CHARLES S. WHEELER, GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

JULIUS E. EVELETH. 

Trustees of Lincoln Library. 
GEORGE G. TARBELL, JOHN F. FARRAR, 

*CHARLES F. ADAMS CHARLES LEE TODD. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, Chairman of Selectmen, ex-officio. 
HENRY E. WARNER, Chairman School Committee, ex-officio. 

Registrars. 
CHARLES S. SMITH, ROBERT D. DONALDSON. 

JOHN F. FARRAR, GEORGE L. CHAPIN. 

School Committee. 

ELIZABETH BLODGETT Term expires 1918 

ANTHONY J. DOHERTY " " 1916 

HENRY E. WARNER " " 1917 

Water Commissioners. 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN Term expires 1918 

JOSEPH S. HART " " 1916 

fGEORGE L. CHAPIN .... " " 1917 

JOHN ADAMS to fill vacancy. 

* Deceased. 

fResigned November 1915. 



Field Drivers. 

ISAAC B. COOK, ISAAC N. MacRAE, 

EDWIN S. BLODGETT. 



Fence Viewers. 
JOHN F. FARRAR, WM. H. SHERMAN. 

Surveyor of Lumber. 
RICHARD A. SHEPARD. 

Measurer* of Wood and Bark. 
SAMUEL FARRAR, JOHN F. FARRAR. 

Cemetery Commissioners. 

CHARLES S. SMITH Term expires 1918 

JULIUS E. EVELETH " " 1916 

ROGER SHERMAN ' " 1917 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 



Proceedings of a Town Meeting held March 1, 1915 

WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln, 

in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify the legal voters of said 
Town of Lincoln, qualified to vote at Town Meeting for 
the transaction of Town affairs, to meet in the Town 
Hall, in said Lincoln, on Monday, the first day of March 
next, at 11.30 o'clock A. M. by posting a copy of this 
Warrant by you attested, in each of the Post Offices and 
in some other public place in said Town, seven days at 
least before the said first day of March, then and there 
to act upon the following Articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose a Moderator. 

ART. 2. To bring in their votes for the following 
Town Officers, and any other officers required by law to 
be elected by ballot or otherwise, also any committees, 
commissioners and trustees. 

Three Selectmen for one year. 

One member of the Board of Assessors to be elected 
for three years. 



8 



One member of the Board of Health to be elected for 
three years. 

One Treasurer for one year. 

One Collector for one year. 

One Auditor for one year. 

Two Constables for one year. 

One Tree Warden for one year. 

One member of the School Committee to be elected 
for three years. 

One member of the Board of Water Commissioners to 
be elected for three years. 

One member of the Board of Cemetery Commissioners 
to be elected for three years. 

Also to vote "Yes" or "No" upon the following 
question : 

"Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in this Town?" 

The polls will be open at 12 o'clock noon and may be 
closed at 6.30 o'clock P. M. 

You are also required to notify and warn the in- 
habitants aforesaid to meet at the Town Hall in said 
town on Monday, the eighth day of March next, at 
one o'clock in the afternoon of said day, to act on the 
following Articles, viz.: 

ART. 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

ART. 4. To appropriate money for necessary and 
expedient purposes of the Town and enact anything in 
relation to the same. 

ART. 5. To determine the manner of collecting taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

ART. 6. To determine the compensation of the 
Collector of Taxes for the ensuing year. 



ART. 7. To see if the Town will authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
during the municipal year, beginning February 1, 1915, 
in anticipation of the collection of taxes for the said year, 
such sums of money as may be necessary for the current 
expenses of the Town, but not exceeding the total tax 
levy for the said year, giving the notes of the Town in 
payment therefor payable in one year from the date 
thereof. All debts incurred under authority of this vote 
shall be paid from taxes of the present municipal year. 

ART. 8. To see if the Town will choose a Committee 
on Claims under the provisions of Section 3, Article 6 
of the By-Laws. 

ART. 9. Shall Chapter 807 of the Acts of nineteen 
hundred and thirteen, being an act to provide for 
compensating laborers, workmen and mechanics for 
injuries sustained in public employment, and to exempt 
from legal liability counties and municipal corporations 
which pay such compensation, be accepted by the 
inhabitants of this Town? 

ART. 10. To see if the Town will change the fiscal 
year of the water works from July 1st to Jan. 1st, or 
take any action in the matter. 

ART. 11. To see if the Town will direct the Water 
Commissioners to collect the fixture rates by August 1st 
and the meter rates by June 25th and December 24th 
respectively in each year. 

ART. 12. To see if the Town will authorize the 
Water Commissioners to install a new pump at the 
Pumping Station and make provisions for payment of 
the same. 



10 

ART. 13. To see if the Town will direct the Town 
Treasurer to pay all the employees of the Town in cash. 

ART. 14. To see if the Town will choose by official 
ballot the Trustees for the Bemis Fund for Free Public 
Lectures, or any other officers of the Town, under the 
Provisions of Chap. 385 of the Acts of 1913, or take 
any action in reference to elections on an official ballot. 

ART. 15. To see if the Town will appoint a com- 
mittee to suggest changes or additions to the By-Laws, 
and report to the next Town Meeting or take any action 
in relation to the matter. 

ART. 16. To see if the Town will extend the street 
lights from Miner's corner, so called on the Concord and 
Wayland Road to the Wayland line, also from the 
stone watering trough corner to Bent's corner, so called. 
Also from Page's corner, so called, to the Waltham line 
(via old Winter Street) or take any action on street 
light extensions. 

ART. 17. To see if the Town will raise the pay of 
the Highway employees from $2.25 to $2.50 for a nine 
hour day. 

ART. 18. To see if the Town will widen old Winter 
Street at the corner opposite the house of Andrew J. 
Dougherty and appropriate money for the same. 

ART. 19. To see if the Town will take any action 
under the provisions of Chapter 103 of the Revised Laws 
or of Chapter 536 of the Acts of 1909 or Acts amendatory 
thereof or supplemental thereto, or take any action in 
relation to the supervision of the business of plumbing, 
or accept the provisions of any of the said acts relating 
to plumbing. 



11 

ART. 20. To see if the Town will accept the provi- 
sions of Chapter 635 of the Acts of 1912, entitled, 
"An Act Relative to Tenement Houses in Towns," or 
of any Act amendatory thereof or supplemental thereto, 
or take any other action in relation to the subject. 

ART. 21. To see if the Town will take any action 
in reference to naming its roads. 

ART. 22. To see if the Town will vote to petition the 
Bureau of Statistics for an Auditor in accordance with 
the Provisions of Chapter 598 of the Acts of 1910 and 
Amendments thereto. 

ART. 23. To see if the Town will accept the provi- 
sions of any Act or Acts thereto enabling them to 
provide by By-Laws or otherwise for issuing local 
licenses to junk dealers or take any action with reference 
to this matter. 



HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

And make due return of this Warrant, with your 
doings thereon, to the Town Clerk at or before the time 
for the meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this fifteenth day of February 
in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and 
fifteen. 

JOHN F. FARRAR, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 
JOSEPH S. HART, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



12 



The return on the Warrant is as follows : 

Lincoln, February 20, 1915. 
I have served this Warrant by Posting an attested 
copy in each of the Post Offices and in the Railroad 
Station seven days before the date of said meeting. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 

Constable of Lincoln. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant the meeting was called 
to order by the Town Clerk who read the Warrant. 

Thomas L. Giles and Herbert G. Farrar were sworn 
as Tellers. 

Hermon T. Wheeler and Thomas J. Dee were sworn 
as Ballot Clerks. 

A package of ballots, said to contain 400 regular 
ballots and 100 School Committee Ballots was delivered 
by the Town Clerk to the Ballot Clerks and their 
receipt for the same taken. 

The Ballot Box was opened and examined, then locked 
and the keys given to the Constable. The Ballot Box 
was empty and the counter showed 0. 

The polls were opened at 12 o'clock M. and remained 
open until 6.30 o'clock P.M. At the closing of the polls 
the counter on the ballot box showed a total vote of 259 
which corresponded with the number of names checked 
by the Ballot Clerks and Tellers. Upon the vote being 
counted it disclosed 253 regular ballots and 6 School 
Committee ballots. 

The following is the result of the ballot as announced 
by the Moderator after the counting of the same. 

Town Clerk — 

George L. Chapin, sworn 186 votes. 

Julian de Cordova, 1 " 

M. Shearman, 1 " 

Blank, 65 " 



13 



Selectmen. — 




Robert D. Donaldson, sworn 


179 votes. 


Winslow A. Eaton, 


98 " 


John F. Farrar, sworn, 


137 " 


Joseph S. Hart, 


99 " 


Charles S. Smith, sworn, 


159 " 


Assessor, 3 years. — 




Cyrus S. Chapin, 


54 votes. 


Charles S. Wheeler, sworn. 


182 " 


Blank, 


17 " 


Treasurer. — 




Charles S. Wheeler, 


215 votes. 


C. S. Smith, 


1 * 


Blank, 


37 " 


Collector of Taxes. — 


. 


Charles S. Wheeler, sworn, 


211 votes. 


Thomas L. Giles, 


1 " 


Blank, 


41 " 


Auditor. — 




James W. Lennon, 


213 votes, 


Blank, 


39 " 


Constables. — 




George E. Cunningham, sworn 


195 votes 


John J. Kelliher, sworn 


193 " 


J. T. Laird, 


1 " 


Rodman Snelling, 


1 " 


M. J. Rooney, 


1 n 


M. Sherman, 


1 1 


Blank, 


14 " 



14 



School Committee, 3 years. . 

Elizabeth Blodgett, 
P. Craven, 
Blank, 

Water Commissioner, 3 years. — 

David Farquhar, 
William H. Sherman, 
Blank, 

Board of Health, 3 years. — 

James T. Laird, 
W. H. Sherman, 
J. S. Hart, 
M. M. Welch, 
Blank, 

Tree Warden. — 

John J. Kelliher, 
Roger Sherman, 
Fritz Cunnert, 
Blank, 

Cemetery Commissioner, 3 years, 

Edward F. Flint, 
Charles S. Smith, 
Blank, 



204 votes. 


1 


<< 


54 


tt 


81 votes. 


159 


n 


13 


a 


193 votes. 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


u 


57 


a 


204 votes. 


1 


a 


1 


u 


47 


a 


93 votes. 


136 


ti 


24 


a 



Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in this town? 

Yes, 31 votes. 

No, 177 " 

Blank, 45 " 



15 



March 8, 1915. The result of the ballot of Mar. 1, 
was announced to the Town by the Moderator. 

The Town Clerk, Selectmen, and Treasurer were 
sworn. 

The following officers were elected : 

Trustee for Bemis Fund for Free Public Lectures, 3 years 
Edward F. Flint. 

Field Drivers.— 

Anthony J. Doherty, sworn. 
John B. Lennon. 

Fence Viewers. — 

John F. Farrar, sworn. 
William H. Sherman, sworn. 

Surveyor of Lumber. — 
Richard A. Shepard. 

Measurers of Wood and Bark. — 

Samuel Farrar, sworn. 
John F. Farrar, sworn. 

Commissioner of Trust Fund, 3 years. — 

Charles S. Smith. 

ART. 3. All of the reports as printed in the Town 
Report, were accepted, each report being taken up 
separately. 



16 



On the acceptance of the Water Commissioners' 
Report, on motion of Chas. S. Smith, 

Voted, to amend the report so as to include the amount 
due the town last year. 

After the acceptance of the Report of the Committee 
on Claims, the following vote was passed. 

Voted, That the Selectmen be directed to acquire by 
purchase or by eminent domain all the land on which the 
school house now stands, which is not now the property 
of the Town, together with all rights of way or other 
rights which are necessary to its proper use as a building 
to hold the fire apparatus and other property of the Town, 
and for such other municipal purposes as it can be fitted 
for. 

ART. 4. The following appropriations were made: 

For Schools ' . $12,500.00 

Support of Poor 500.00 

Highways and Bridges .... 12,000.00 

Library — The Dog Tax and . 1,000.00 

Interest 500.00 

Cemeteries 500.00 

Board of Health 200.00 

Tree Warden 500.00 

Suppression of Gypsy and Brown Tail Moths 2,000.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses .... 5,000.00 

Hydrant and other Public Water Service . 2,400.00 

Waltham Hospital — Free Bed . . 250.00 

Street Lamps 1,600.00 

Fire Department ....'.. 100.00 

Payment Schoolhouse Bond . 3,000.00 

Interest Schoolhouse Bond . . . 1,080.00 
Payment Water Bonds (to be taken from 

Water Works Income) . . . . 1,000.00 
Sinking Fund (to be taken from 

Water Works Income) .... 1,500.00 



17 



A motion was made for an appropriation to buy a 
Motor Fire Truck, but the motion was voted down, and 
it was voted that the matter of the purchase of such a 
truck be left to the Selectmen to report at the next 
Annual Meeting. 

ART. 5. Voted, To collect the taxes in the same way 
and manner as last year. 

Interest at the rate of 6% a year to be charged on all 
taxes not paid on or before November 1. And the Col- 
lector is authorized to collect the tax of any person, after 
said first day of November, either by distress or im- 
prisonment. 

ART. 6. Voted, That the compensation of the Col- 
lector of Taxes be 1 l A% of the amount collected. 

ART. 7. Voted, That the Town Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is, author- 
ized to borrow money from time to time in anticipation 
of the taxes of the municipal year beginning January 
1, 1915 to an amount not exceeding the total levy for 
the said year, and to issue notes therefor payable within 
one year. Any debt or debts incurred under this vote 
to be paid from taxes of the said municipal year. 

ART. 8. Voted, To choose a Committee on Claims. 
Chose, Moorfield Storey under Julius E. Eveleth. 

ART. 2. Charles S. Wheeler. 

ART. 9. Voted, to pass over the article. 

ART. 10. Voted, To pass over the article. 

ART. 11. Voted, To pass over the Article. 



18 

ART. 12. Voted, To pass over the Article. 

ART. 13. Voted, To pass over the Article. 

ART. 14. Voted, That the election of Trustee of 
Bemis Fund for Free Lectures and Commissioner of 
Trust Fund be by Official Ballot. 

ART. 15. Voted, That the whole matter be left to 
the Selectmen to report at the next Annual Town Meet- 
ing. 

ART. 16. Voted, That the whole matter of Street 
Lamps be left to the Selectmen with full powers. 

ART. 17. Voted, To refer the matter to the Select- 
men. 

ART. 18. Voted, To refer the matter to the Select- 
men with full powers. 

ART. 19. Voted, To pass over the Article. 

ART. 20. Voted, To accept the provisions of Chapter 
635 of the Acts of 1912 entitled "An Act Relative to 
Tenement Houses in Towns. " 

ART. 21. Voted, To pass over the article. 

ART. 22. Under this article the following preamble 
and votes were offered by the Hon. Charles Francis 
Adams, and unanimously passed. 

Whereas, the annual levy of the Town of Lincoln, as 
of other municipalities of the Commonwealth, has under 
the head of State and County taxation rapidly increased 
during recent years and now averages to the family unit 



19 



$55. per year, as compared with $32 in 1909, and $24 in 
1895, and moreover, this burden judging from all ac- 
cessible indications, is likely still further to increase : and 

Whereas, also, it is obvious that the above rate of 
increase, if general, cannot go on indefinitely without 
affecting prejudically the continued prosperity of the 
Commonwealth; therefore, 

Voted, That the attention of our Senators and Repre- 
sentatives in the Great and General Court and of all 
other officials of the Commonwealth be called to the 
fact above stated; and they be requested, and when 
representative be instructed rigidly to systematize and 
revise all items of public expenditure, with a view to a 
reduction of the same; or, if reduction should in any 
given case be either impracticable or undesirable, to 
avoiding any further increase thereof. 

Voted, That in the judgment of the Town of Lincoln 
the maximum of safe public expenditure has now been 
more than reached, and any increase thereof cannot fail 
to be detrimental to the community. 

Voted, That the Town Clerk be instructed to cause 
the foregoing votes to be printed, and duly authenticated 
copies of the same to be forwarded to members of the 
Council, the Senator and the Representative of the 
respective Districts in which Lincoln is included, as 
also to the officers of the Executive Department of the 
Commonwealth, to the Senators and Representatives 
generally of Middlesex County, to the County officials, 
and to the Treasurers and Assessors of the several towns 
of said county. 

Voted, That the Town Reports, the Treasurer's books, 
and the vouchers of the Town expenses since 1910 be 



20 



examined by an expert accountant, employed by the 
Board of Selectmen for the purpose and the results 
tabulated. The purpose of such investigation being to 
enable the average tax-payer to inform himself as to the 
details of the income and outgo of the Town during the 
period specified, the sources from which revenues were 
derived, and the exact use made of those revenues, the 
annual percentages of increase or decrease in each con- 
siderable item of outgo being set forth. 

ART. 23. Voted, To accept the provisions of any 
Act or Acts thereto enabling the Town to provide by 
By-Laws or otherwise for issuing local licenses to junk 
dealers. 

Voted, To adjourn. 

Attest : 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



21 

LIST OF JURORS 
As prepared by the Selectmen in June 



Name P. 0. Address Occupation 
John Adams, So. Lincoln. 

Charles H. Bamforth, So. Lincoln, R. F. D. Carpenter 

Fred D. J. Bamforth, LincolD Farmer 

James T. Calkins, So. Lincoln Gateman 

Arthur F. Chapin, Lincoln Clerk 

Harold S. Cousins, So. Lincoln Grocer 

Fritz Cunnert, Lincoln Laborer 

Russell'G. Crook, So. Lincoln Sculptor 

Andrew J. Dougherty, Jr. Lincoln Farmer 

Charles P. Farnsworth, So. Lincoln Farmer 

Herbert G. Farrar, So. Lincoln Farmer 

Ephraim B. Flint, Lincoln Farmer 

Thomas L. Giles, So. Lincoln Carpenter 

D. Lincoln Hamilton, Lincoln Carpenter 

Walter W. Johnson, Lincoln Farmer 

John E. McHugh, Concord, R. F. D. Farmer 

John W. Nelson, Lexington, R. F. D. Farmer 

James M. Neville, Lexington, R. F. D. Farmer 

Charles 0. Sargent, Lexington, R. F. D. Farmer 

John W. Sims, So. Lincoln Painter 

T. Wilbur Smith, Lincoln Farmer 

Martin M. Welch, So. Lincoln Farmer 

Abner S. Wheeler, So. Lincoln Clerk 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



22 



Proceedings of the State Primary, held 
September 21, 191 5 

WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby 
required to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town 
who are qualified to vote in Primaries to meet in Town 
Hall, Tuesday, the Twenty-first day of September, 1915, 
at 7 o'clock P.M. for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for 
the nomination of candidates of political parties for the 
following offices: 

Governor for this Commonwealth. 

Lieutenant-Governor for this Commonwealth. 

Secretary of the Commonwealth, for this Common- 
wealth. 

Treasurer and Receiver General, for this Common- 
wealth. 

Auditor of the Commonwealth, for this Common- 
wealth. 

Attorney-General, for this Commonwealth. 

Councillor, for Sixth Councillor District. 

Senator, for Fifth Senatorial District. 

Representative in General Court, for Thirteenth 
Representative District. 



23 



County Commissioner, 
County Treasurer, 
Sheriff, 

And for the election of the following officers : 
District Member of State Committee for each political 
party for the Fifth Senatorial District. 

Members of the Democratic Town Committee. 
Members of the Republican Town Committee. 
Members of the Progressive Party Town Committee. 
Delegates to State Conventions of Political Parties. 
All the above candidates and officers are to be voted 
for upon one ballot. 

The polls will be open from 7 o'clock P. M. to 9 o'clock 
P. M. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting 
attested copies thereof seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting as directed by vote of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 
Given under our hands this 14th day of September, 
A. D. 1915. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 
Attest : 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 
Constable. 

The return on the Warrant is as follows : 

Lincoln, Sept. 14, 1915 
I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy in each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad 
Station, seven days before the date of said meeting. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Constable. 



24 



Pursuant to the above Warrant the meeting was called 
to order by the Chairman of the Selectmen who read 
the Warrant. " 

Thomas L. Giles and Herbert G. Farrar were sworn 
as Tellers. Hermon T. Wheeler and James W. Lennon 
were sworn as Ballot Clerks. 

The Ballot Box was opened examined and then locked, 
and in the absence of a constable, the keys were kept by 
the Town Clerk. The counter on the Ballot Box showed 
0. 

The Town Clerk delivered to the Ballot Clerks, one 
box said to contain four hundred and fifty ballots, taking 
their receipt for the same. 

The polls were then opened and remained open until 
9 o'clock when they were closed and the ballots counted 
by parties. 

Upon the completion of the counting the following 
result was announced by the presiding officer. 

REPUBLICAN PARTY 



FOR GOVERNOR.— 

Grafton D. Cushing of Boston, 
Eugene N. Foss of Boston 
Samuel W. McCall of Winchester 

LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR.— 

Calvin Coolidge of Northampton, 
Guy Andrews Ham of Milton, 



27 votes. 


10 " 


57 " 


60 votes, 


22 " 



SECRETARY.— 

Albert P. Langtry of Springfield, 



74 votes. 



TREASURER.— 

Charles L. Burrill of Boston, 



68 votes. 



25 



AUDITOR.— 

Edward C. R. Bagley of Boston, 
Alonzo B. Cook of Boston, 
Samuel W. George of Haverhill, 

ATTORNEY-GENERAL.— 
Henry C. Attwill of Lynn, 

COUNCILLOR, Sixth District.— 
Henry C. Mulligan of Natick, 

SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex District.— 
Nathan A. Tufts of Waltham, 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL 

13th Middlesex District. — 
Immanuel Pfeiffer, Jr. of Bedford 
Benjamin Loring Young of Weston, 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER, Middlesex.- 
John Lothrop Dyer of Cambridge, 
Harry A. Penniman of Cambridge, 
Chester B. Williams of Wayland, 

COUNTY TREASURER.— 

Joseph O. Hayden of Somerville, 
Harold David Wilson of Somerville 

SHERIFF.— 

John R. Fairbairn of Cambridge, 
Adelbert B. Messer of Concord, 
John F. Farrar of Lincoln, 

STATE COMMITTEE.— 
John F. Farrar of Lincoln 
Scattering, 



33 votes. 
26 " 
12 " 



70 votes. 



63 " 



74 votes. 


COURT, 


33 votes. 


78 votes. 


7 votes. 


6 " 


66 " 


55 votes. 


11 votes. 


65 votes. 


26 " 


1 " 


3 votes. 


5 " 



26 



PROGRESSIVE PARTY 

FOR GOVERNOR.— 

Nelson B. Clark of Beverly, 2 votes. 

Richard Hale, 1 " 
No votes were cast for Lieut. -Governor, Secretary, 

Treasurer, Auditor, Att'y-General, Councillor, Senator. 

FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER.— 

George A. Goodwin of Cambridge, 2 votes. 

FOR COUNTY TREASURER.— 

David A. Keefe of Cambridge, 1 vote. 
No votes for Sheriff or State Committee. 

FOR DELEGATES TO STATE CONVENTION.— 

Wendall D. Crowell, 2 votes. 

Roderick B. Laird, 1 " 

Hermon T. Wheeler 2 " 

Joseph S. Hart, 1 " 



FOR TOWN COMMITTEE.— 




Patrick J. Lennon, 


3 votes 


Stephen A. Blodgett, 


3 " 


Duncan D. Chipman, 


3 " 


E. Irving Smith, 


3 " 


Hermon T. Wheeler, 


3 " 


Joseph S. Hart, 


3 " 


Wendall D. Crowell, 


3 " 



27 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

FOR GOVERNOR.— 

David I. Walsh of Fitchburg, 4 votes. 

FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR.— 

Edward P. Barry of Boston, 4 votes. 

FOR SECRETARY.— 

Edwin A. Grosvenor of Amherst, 4 votes. 

FOR TREASURER.— 

Henry L. Bowles of Springfield, 4 votes. 

FOR AUDITOR.— 

Jacob C. Morse of Brookline, 4 votes. 



FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Joseph Joyce Donohue of Medford 
Harold Williams, Jr. of Brookline, 



3 votes. 
1 vote. 



FOR COUNCILLOR, Sixth District- 
Joseph. H. McNally of Watertown, 



4 votes. 



FOR SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex District.— 

Patrick J. Duane of Waltham, 4 votes. 

FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 

13th Middlesex District. — 
Thomas J. Burke of Concord, . 4 votes. 



FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER.- 
Michael M. O'Connor of Cambridge, 



4 votes. 



28 

FOR COUNTY TREASURER.— 

David A. Keefe of Cambridge, 4 votes. 

FOR SHERIFF.— 

John J. Donovan of Lowell, 4 votes. 

FOR STATE COMMITTEE, 5th Middlesex District 
Bernard W. Stanley of Waltham, 4 votes. 

FOR DELEGATE TO STATE CONVENTION.— 

Anthony J. Doherty, 3 votes. 

FOR TOWN COMMITTEE.— 
M. M. Welch, 
A. J. Doherty, 
C. L. Todd, 
P. F. Corrigan, 
Thomas J. Dee, 



Voted to adjourn. 



GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk 



November 2, 1915. Howard Snelling was this day 
sworn as Special Police by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



October 22, 1915. John F. Farrar was this day sworn 
as Special Police by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



29 



Proceedings of the State Election held November 2, 1915. 

WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
MIDDLESEX, S.S. 

To any Constable in the Town of Lincoln, in said County : 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabi- 
tants of the Town of Lincoln, duly qualified to vote in 
the election of State and County Officers, to assemble at 
Town Hall, on Tuesday, November 2nd, at seven o'clock 
in the forenoon, to give in their votes for the following 
officers, viz.: Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Secre- 
tary, Treasurer, Auditor, Attorney-General, Councillor, 
Senator, Representative in General Court, County Com- 
missioner, County Treasurer, Sheriff, and any other 
officer required by law to be chosen in the month of 
November of the current year. 

All officers enumerated above are to be designated 
and voted for on one ballot, and also the following ques- 
tions : — 

QUESTIONS. 

Acceptance of Chap. 129, Resolves of 1915, entitled 
"Resolves to provide for submitting to the people the 
article of amendment of the Constitution empowering 
the General Court to authorize the taking of land to 
relieve congestion of population and to provide homes 
for citizens." 



30 

Acceptance of Chap. 130, Resolves of 1915, entitled 
" Resolves to provide for submitting to the people the 
article of amendment of the Constitution striking the 
word 'male' from the qualifications of voters.' ' 

Acceptance of Chap. 140, Resolves of 1915, entitled 
" Resolves to provide for submitting to the people the 
article of amendment of the Constitution relative to the 
authority of the General Court to impose taxes." 

The polls to be opened at seven o'clock A.M., and 
may be closed at four o'clock P.M., and you are directed 
to serve this Warrant by posting an attested copy thereof 
in each of the Post Offices and one of the churches, or 
in some other public place, seven days at least before 
the day appointed for said meeting, and to make season- 
able return thereof with your doings thereon to the Town 
Clerk. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

Given under our hands, this twenty-fifth day of Octo- 
ber, in the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred and 
fifteen. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

The return on the Warrant is as follows: 

Lincoln, Oct. 26, 1915. 
I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy in each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad 
Station seven days before the date of said meeting. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Constable. 



31 



Pursuant to the above Warrant, the meeting was called 
to order by the Chairman of the Selectmen and after 
reading the Warrant, Thomas L. Giles and Herbert G. 
Farrar were sworn as Tellers, and James W. Lennon and 
Thomas J. Dee were sworn as Ballot Clerks. 

The package of ballots as received by the Town Clerk 
was turned over to the Ballot Clerks. The Ballot Box 
was opened and examined, then locked and the keys 
given to the Constable. The counter on the Ballot 
Box showed . 

The polls were then opened and remained open until 
6 o'clock P.M., when the counter on the Ballot Box 
showed 230. There were 231 Ballots cast which upon 
counting showed the following result. 



FOR GOVERNOR.— 

Nelson B. Clark of Beverly, 
Walter S. Hutchins of Greenfield, 
Samuel McCall of Winchester, 
William Shaw of Andover, 
David I. Walsh of Fitchburg 
Blank, 



5 votes. 
2 " 
140 
3 

80 

1 



FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR.— 

Edward P. Barry of Boston, 70 votes. 

Calvin Coolidge of Northampton 146 

Alfred H. Evans of Hadley 4 

James Hayes of Plymouth, 1 

Chester R. Lawrence of Boston 4 

Samuel P. Levenberg of Boston, 2 

Blank, 4 



32 



FOR SECRETARY.— 

Edwin A. Grosvenor of Amherst, 
Albert P. Langtry of Springfield 
Thomas J. Maher of Medford, 
Marion E. Sproule of Lowell, 
Willard 0. Wylie of Beverly, 
Blank, 

FOR TREASURER.— 

Henry L. Bowles of Springfield, 
Charles L. Burrill of Boston, 
Charles E. Fenner of Worcester, 
William E. Marks of Worcester, 
Blank, 

FOR AUDITOR.— 

Alonzo B. Cook of Boston, 
James W. Holden of New Bedford, 
Henry C. Iram of Warwick, 
Jacob C. Morse of Brookline, 
William G. Rogers of Wilbraham, 
Blank, 

FOR ATTORNEY-GENERAL.— 
Henry C. At twill of Lynn, 
Frank Auchter of Boston, 
Joseph Joyce Donahue of Medford 
John McCarthy of Abington, 
William Taylor of Worcester, 
Blank, 

FOR COUNCILLOR, Sixth District. 
Joseph H. McNally of Watertown, 
Henry C. Mulligan of Natick, 
Blank, 



66 votes 


145 


a 


1 


CI 


3 


ti 


4 


iC 


14 


(C 


67 votes 


147 


u 


4 


a 


1 


i( 


12 


a 


133 votes. 


2 


it 


2 


tt 


74 


tt 


5 


a 


18 


it 


149 votes. 


4 


(i 


62 


n 


1 


a 


15 


(C 


15 


a 


63 votes. 


138 


a 


30 


a 



33 

FOR SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex District.— 

Patrick J. Duane of Waltham, 59 votes. 

Nathan A. Tufts of Waltham, 144 " 

Blank, 28 " 

FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT. 

13th Middlesex District. — 
Thomas J. Burke of Concord, 57 votes. 

Benjamin Loring Young of Weston, 161 " 

Blank, 13 " 

FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, Middlesex.- 
Alfred L. Cutting of Weston, 
John Lothrop Dyer of Cambridge, 
George A. Goodwin of Cambridge 
Michael M. O'Connor of Cambridge, 
William H. Walsh 
Blank, 

FOR COUNTY TREASURER, Middlesex.- 
DeWitt Clinton Clapp of Cambridge 6 

Joseph O. Hayden of Somerville, 140 

David A. Keefe of Cambridge 53 

Blank, 32 



133 


votes 


4 


u 


8 


n 


53 


a 


10 


a 


23 


n 



3R SHERIFF, Middlesex County — 






John J. Donovan of Lowell, 


51 


ll 


John R. Fairbairn of Cambridge, 


154 


tt 


Blank, 


26 


tt 



Shall a proposed amendment to the Constitution 
empowering the General Court to authorize the taking 
of land to relieve congestion of population to provide 
homes for citizens, be approved and ratified? 

Yes, 86 votes. 

No, 68 " 

Blank, 77 " 



34 



Shall the following proposed amendment to the Con- 
stitution, enabling women to vote, be approved and 
ratified? 

ARTICLE OF AMENDMENT 

Article three of the articles of amendment to the Con- 
stitution of the Commonwealth is hereby amended by 
striking out in the first fine thereof the word "male." 

Yes, 66 votes. 

No, 143 " 

Blank, 22 " 

Shall the following proposed amendment to the Con- 
stitution, relative to the taxation of incomes and the 
granting of reasonable exemptions, be approved and 
ratified? 

ARTICLE OF AMENDMENT. 

Full power and authority are hereby given and granted 
to the General Court to impose and levy a tax on in- 
comes in the manner hereinafter provided. Such tax 
may be at different rates upon income derived from 
different classes of property, but shall be levied at a 
uniform rate throughout the Commonwealth upon in- 
comes derived from the same class of property. The 
General Court may tax incomes not derived from prop- 
erty at a lower rate than income derived from property 
and may grant reasonable exemptions and abatements. 

Any class of property the income from which is 
taxed under provisions of this article may be exempted 
from the imposition and levying of proportional and 
reasonable assessments, rates and taxes, as at present 
authorized by the Constitution. This article shall not 



35 



be construed to limit the power of the General Court to 
impose and levy reasonable duties and excises. 



Yes, 

No, 
Blank, 



114 votes. 
41 " 
76 " 



The above vote was counted in blocks of fifty votes 
and each block was immediately sealed. 

After the total tally sheets had been completed, the 
vote was read by the presiding officer. 

The ballots, with the tally sheets were then sealed in 
a box provided for the same after which it was 

Voted to adjourn. 

Attest : 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk 



Vote of the Thirteenth Middlesex District for Repre- 
sentation in the General Court, as determined at the 
Town Clerk's meeting held at Concord, Nov. 12, 1915. 





Bed. 


Con. 


Lin. 


Sud. 


Way. 


West. 


Total 


Thomas J. 
















Burke of 
















Concord, 


61 


319 


57 


36 


122 


17 


612 


Benjamin 
















Loring 
















Young of 
















Weston 


192 


624 


161 


146 


299 


420 


1,842 


Blank, 


18 


77 


13 


19 


26 


7 


160 


Total, 


271 


1020 


231 


201 


447 


444 


2,614 



36 



Two certificates of election were filled out for Ben- 
jamin Loring Young of Weston and signed by 
Abbott R.' Webber, Town Clerk of Bedford. 
William D. Cross, Town Clerk of Concord. 
George L. Chapin, Town Clerk of Lincoln. 
Frank F. Gerry, Town Clerk of Sudbury. 
Warren L. Bishop, Town Clerk of Wayland. 
George W. Cutting, Town Clerk of Weston. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

February 8, 1915. Arthur F. Chapin was this day 
appointed Assistant Town Clerk and sworn by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

February 20, 1915. Roger Sherman was this day 
sworn as Weigher of Coal, Hay, Grain and other com- 
modities by 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Assistant Town Clerk. 

March 4, 1915. William J. Bennett was this day 
sworn as Weigher of Coal, Hay and Grain by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

April 17, 1915. S. Rodman Snelling, was this day 
sworn as Weigher of Coal, Hay and Grain by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

May 5, 1915. Martin M. Welch, was this day sworn 
as Inspector of Animals by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



37 



May 7, 1915. William A. Harding, was this day 
sworn as Special Police by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

May 14, 1915. Winslow A. Eaton, was this day 
sworn as Special Police by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

May 22, 1915. Lorenzo E. Brooks, was this day 
sworn as Special Police by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

June 1, 1915. Herbert G. Farrar, was this day 
sworn as Special Police by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

Nov. 22, 1915. Arthur F. Chapin having been elected 
by the Board of Selectmen to fill the vacancy caused 
by the resignation of Mr. George L. Chapin was this 
day sworn as Town Clerk for the remainder of the current 
year. 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



38 

There have been recorded during the year ending 
December 31, 1915, 24 Births, 14 Marriages, 14 Deaths. 



Births Registered. 



Date of Birth. 


Name of Child. 


Name of Parents. 


July 


15, 1914 


Mary Corrigan. 


Martin and Annie (Dempsey.) 
Clarence G. and Mattie E. (By am.) 


Jan. 


24, 1915 


Gertrude Leora Frost. 


Feb. 


13, " 


Antonio Cotona. 


Nicholas and Caroline (Noevico.) 


April 


14, - " 


Disaae. 


Aleck and Mary (Duchensea.) 


May- 


9, " 


Evelyn May Watson. 


Charles A. and Gladys P. (Thompson.) 


May 


31, " 


Albert Edward Kennedy 


John and Honor (Cole.) 


July 


4, " 


Sophia Lovering Hunt 


Merrill and Hope (Woods.) 


June 


14, " 


Nancy Russ. 


Percy P. and Bertha (Graves.) 


June 


17, " 


Harris. 


William P. and Ida (Tyler.) 


July 


12, " 


William John Bennett. 


William J. and Ellen Mary (Flood.) 


July 


15, " 


Ed. McKinley Cunningham 


George E. and Elizabeth (McKinley.) 


July 


31, " 


—Sherman 


George N. and Jenetta (Seymour.) 


Aug. 


10, " 


Antonio Cerasa. 


Michael and Amelia (Morganella.) 


Aug. 


12, " 


Augustus Sanditicola. 


Incassio and Francisco (Deodato.) 


Aug. 


23, " 


George Henry Bean. 


Harold S. and Anna A. (Moneford.) 


Sept. 


2, " 


Harry Cook 


Isaac B. and Delia (Casey.) 
Andrew and Sarah A. (Holmes.) 


Sept. 


5, " 


Pederson. 


Oct. 


6, " 


Wallace Enfried H. Hanson. 


Ernest and Elsie (Erickson.) 


Nov. 


13, " 


Ellen Mary Hayes. 


John J. and Delia A. (Kelly.) 


Nov. 


1. " 


Etthonici. 


Joseph and Rosie (Carello.) 


Dec. 


6, " 


Horace Edward Hart. 


Joseph S. and Harriet L. (Darling.) 


Dec. 


13, " 


Barbara Lillian Peck. 


Chester G. and Mary M. B. (Williams.) 


Dec. 


22, " 


Virginia Foreman. 


Charles F. and Annie M. (Limond.) 


Nov. 


25, " 


Charlotte Harris Flint. 


Edward F. and Josephine M. (Ritchie) 



39 



Marriages Registered, 



Date of Marriage. 



Names. 



Residence. 



Jan. 13, 1915. 

Jan. 27, 

April 19, 

April 29, 

April 22, 

June 29, 

Aug. 9, 

Sept. 4, 

Sept. 15, 

Sept. 15, 

Oct. 7, 

Dec. 11, 

Oct. 18, 

Dec. 18, 



John Patrick Ryan. 
Eulalia Isabel Morgan. 

Charles Abraham Hews. 
Annie Frances Welch. 

Thomas Frank Coan 
Ann Agnes Crowley. 

Joseph Delorey. 
Mary J. Tulia. 

Joseph Edward Whippee 
Ida Parviner. 

Russell Gilbert Merriman. 
Ethel Foster Bent. 

Everett H. Davison. 
Ila Mattie Streeter. 

William Edward Watson. 
Clair Luella Wentworth. 

Thomas Edwards Sherwin. 
Emily Louisa Blodgett. 

Timothy Francis Moynihan. 
Winifred May O'Niel. 

Richard Briggs, Jr. 
Alice Evelyn Bisbee. 

Jav Morrill Heald. 
Ethel Leroy Elliot. 

William M. Hilliard. 
Florence M. Barnes. 

John Tasker. 
Jennie Knox. 



Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 



Weston. 
Lincoln. 



Lincoln 
Ireland. 



Lincoln. 
Concord. 



Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 



Leominster. 
Lincoln. 



Lincoln. 
Rutland, Vt. 



Lincoln. 
Waltham. 



Boston. 
Lincoln. 



Lincoln. 
Concord. 



Lincoln. 
Weston. 



Lincoln. 
Boston. 



Boston. 
Lincoln. 



Lincoln. 
Wellington. 



40 



Deaths Registered. 



Date of Death. 


Name. 


Y. 


Age. 
M. 


D. 


Jan. 16, 1915. 


Samuel Royal Harrod Biggs. 


66 


11 


14 


Mar. 8, " 


Mary Miner. 


63 


5 


6 


Mar. 23, " 


Martha Maria Jones. 


80 


7 


9 


April 4, " 


James B. Wheeler. 


63 


3 


23 


May 3, " 


Ellen L. Campbell. 


81 


8 


5 


May 9, " 


Charles J. Westling. 


55 


— 


— 


May 26, " 


Florence McCormick. 


3 


9 


— 


June 5, " 


Ellen Frances Sweet 


76 


4 


3 


June 23, " 


Joseph F. Ahearn 


4 


5 


— 


July 22, " 


Jabez N. Smith. 


71 


— 


14 


July 24, M 


Rev. George Henry Flint. 


50 


6 


— 


Nov. 2, " 


— — Etthomici. 


— 


— 


— 


Nov. 20, " 


Josephine Woodhull 


62 


9 


3 


Oct. 9, " 


Margaret Coughlin. 


70 


— 


— 



41 



EXTRACT FROM THE REVISED LAWS Chap. 29 
AS AMENDED BY CHAP. 280, ACTS OF 1912 

i Sect. 1. Physicians and midwives shall, within forty- 
eight hours after the birth of every child in cases of 
which they were in charge, mail or deliver to the clerk 
or registrar of the city or town in which the birth oc- 
curred a notice stating the date and place of the birth, 
giving the street number, if any, the number of the 
ward in a city and the family name. Failure to mail or 
deliver the said notice shall be punished by a fine not 
exceeding twenty-five dollars for each offence. The 
notice required by this Section need not be given if the 
notice required by the following Section is given within 
forty-eight hours after the birth occurs. 

Sect. 6. Parents, within forty days after the birth of a 
child, and every householder, within forty days after the 
birth of a child in his house, shall cause notice thereof to 
be given to the clerk of the City or Town, in which such 
child is born. 

Sect. 8. A parent, keeper, superintendent or other 
person who is required by Section 6 to give or cause to be 
given notice of a birth or death, who neglects so to do for 
ten days after the time limited therefor, shall forfeit not 
more than five dollars for such offence. 



42 



DOGS LICENSED IN 1915. 

There have been 135 Dog Licenses issued as follows: 
114 Males, 16 Females, 3 Spayed Females, 2 Kennels, 
for which the sum of $387.00 has been paid to the County 
Treasurer. \ 

There have been four licenses issued since December 
1, 1915, and these will be included in the return made 
to the County Treasurer in June. 

There have been 53 Resident Hunters Licenses issued 
for which $45.05 has been paid to the Commissioners on 
Fisheries and Game. 

ARTHUR F. CAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



43 



AUDITORS REPORT 

I have examined the accounts of the Town Treasurer 
and also the vouchers for all money paid by same and 
found them correct. 

I have also visited Mr. C. L. Todd, Treasurer of the 
Sinking Fund and have seen all securities of the Town, 
held by him. 

Following is an account of the money paid by the 
Treasurer on the Selectmen's approval. 

JAMES W. LENNON, 

Auditor. 



44 



REPORT OF THE SELECTMEN 



The Selectmen present the following report for the 
fiscal year, ending December 31, 1915. 

The Board was organized by the choice of Charles 
S. Smith, Chairman, and R. D. Donaldson, Secretary. 

The following table gives the appropriations made by 
the Town during the year 1915, and the appropriations 
recommended by the Board to be made at the next 
Annual Meeting: — 







The Selectmen 
recommend the 






following appro- 


_ 


Appropriations 


priations for the 




for 1915 


ensuing year 


Schools, $12,500.00 


$12,500.00 


Support of Poor, 


500.00 


500.00 


Highways and Bridges, 


12,000.00 


10,000.00 


Library, Dog Tax, and 


1,000.00 


500.00 


Interest, 


500.00 


500.00 


Cemeteries (to be taken 






from funds in hands of 






Treasurer belonging to 






Cemetery Trustees), 


500.00 


500.00 


Board of Health ; 


200.00 


200.00 


Tree Warden, 


500.00 


500.00 


Suppression of Gypsy and 






Brown Tail Moths, 


2,000.00 


2,000.00 


Miscellaneous Expenses, 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


Hydrant and other public 






water service, 


2,400.00 


2,400.00 



45 



Waltham Hospital, Free 






Bed, 


$250.00 


$250.00 


Street Lamps, 


1,600.00 


1,800.00 


Fire Department 


100.00 


2,500.00 


Payment Schoolhouse 






Bonds, 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


. Interest Schoolhouse 






Bonds, 


1,080.00 


1,080.00 


Payment of Water Bond 






(to be taken from Water 






Works Income), 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


Water Sinking Fund (to 






be taken from Water 






Works Income) 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 


Appointments 





The following appointments have been made during 
the year: 

Sealer of Weights and Measures, Matthew H. Doherty. 

Weighers of Coal, Hay, Grain and other Commodities, 
Roger Sherman, Wm. J. Bennett, S. Rodman Snelling. 

Inspector of Animals, Martin M. Welch. 

Special Police, William A. Harding, Winslow A. Eaton, 
Lorenzo E. Brooks, Herbert G. Farrar, John F. Farrar. 

Forest Warden, John J. Kelliher. 

Ballot Clerks and Tellers at the Annual State and 
and Town Election, James W. Lennon, Thomas L. Giles, 
Herbert G. Farrar, Thomas J. Dee, Herman T. Wheeler. 

Janitor of Public Buildings and Caretaker of Public 
Grounds, Edward Bannon. 

Finances 

The bond issue on account of new schools, which 
originally was $55,000 has been reduced by yearly pay- 
ments of $3,000 to $34,000. The Commissioners of 



46 



Sinking and Trust Funds have in their possession seven 
bonds of $1,000 each purchased with funds appropriated 
by the Town for the purpose in previous years, together 
with about $700 of accrued interest on same. 

We recommend that the Town appropriate $3,000 to 
retire the bonds in accordance with the terms of the issue, 
and that $1,080 be appropriated for the interest on. the 
outstanding bonds. 

We also recommend that a vote be passed authorizing 
and directing the Sinking and Trust Fund Commissioners 
to turn over the Schoolhouse Bonds in their possession, 
together with such cash as they have on Schoolhouse 
Bond account to the Town Treasurer, the Bonds to be 
cancelled and the cash to be converted into the general 
treasury. 

We also recommend that a very large proportion of 
the available funds in the treasury on January 1st be 
appropriated to purchase additional Schoolhouse Bonds, 
which, when purchased, shall be turned over to the Town 
Treasurer for cancellation. 

There is a much larger amount of cash in the treasury 
on account of the fact that in 1914 an appropriation of 
$8,000 was made from available funds in the treasury 
for the retirement of Schoolhouse Bonds which amount 
was not certified to the Selectmen in that year, and con- 
sequently the money remained in the treasury. 

Support of Poor 

Only a small sum has been expended during the year, 
most of which has been for mothers' aid and not for the 
regular expenditures coming under the head Support of 
Poor. 

Fire Department 

This Department has been conducted during the year 
as heretofore. For more detailed report, reference is 
made to the Report of the Fire Engineer. 



47 



Tree Warden 

Report of the Tree Warden gives a full account of the 
work his department has accomplished during the year 
with recommendations for the future. 

Silent Poor Fund 

Only $10 from the income of this fund has been used 
during the year. 

Highways 

The highways have been in charge during the year of 
Mr. William H. Sherman, as during the year previous. 
Reference is made to his Report for detailed informa- 
tion, which is quite full. 

At the last Annual Town Meeting an address was made 
on the Increase of Taxation, General as well as Municipal, 
by our late esteemed fellow townsman, Mr. Charles 
Francis Adams. Although this address was printed in 
pamphlet form and distributed quite extensively, on 
account of its merit and also as it was the last address 
of Mr. Adams delivered before any forum, the Selectmen 
reprint it in this Report. 

The vote recommended by Mr. Adams, and passed 
unanimously, in connection with this address was as 
follows : 

Voted, That the Town Reports, the Treasurer's Books, 
and the vouchers of the Town expenses since the year 
1910 be examined by an expert accountant, employed by 
the Board of Selectmen for the purpose, and the results 
tabulated. The purpose of such investigation being to 
enable the average tax payer to inform himself as to the 
details of the income and outgo of the Town during the 
period specified, the sources from which revenues were 
derived, and the exact use made of those revenues, the 
annual percentages of increase or decrease in each con- 
siderable item of outgo being set forth. 



48 






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49 



From the above it will be noticed that the expenditures 
for schools has increased year by year, from $9,019 in 
1909 to $15,019.55 in 1915, an increase approximately of 
about 80%. By reference to the School Committee's 
Reports of the various years and the Report of the 
Auditor for the corresponding years, a complete explan- 
ation will be found for this very large increase in ex- 
penditures. Our investigation shows that it has come 
about in two ways : 

First — By the large expense caused by the increased 
number of children attending the high schools, and 
the increased tuition charges made by the Town of 
Concord for the education of high school children, and 

Second — By the considerable increase in the charges 
for transportation of scholars to the local schools. 

To illustrate: In the year 1909, there were 19 children 
attending high school; in the year 1915, there were 44, 
and the tuition charges were in 1909, $848.00 and trans- 
portation $242.00 and 1915, $4,251.45 and $869.19, 
respectively, an increase of nearly 500%. The trans- 
portation service for children locally increased from 
$1,332.00 in 1909 to $2,597.00 in 1915, an increase of 
nearly 100%. 

It is only fair to state in connection with the expendi- 
tures for schools in all the years referred to that the 
amounts given do not include any charge for interest or 
depreciation, which in the case of the Lincoln schools 
can hardly be reckoned as less than $4,000 per year, 
which sum added to the expenditures reported for the 
various years will increase that sum in the year 1909 to 
$13,019 and in the year 1915 to $19,019, and of the 
intervening years by an increase of $4,000 each year. 

For an intelligent understanding of the expenditures 
for schools and other departments in any year, the detail 
of expenditures of each department in the Auditor's 
Report should be studied carefully. 



50 



Next to schools, the largest expenditure is for highways. 
By reference to the above table, it will be seen that in 
1909, the expenditure on this account was $5,604, and 
in 1915, $13,580, with largely increased amounts each 
year from 1909 to 1915. 

It is only fair to state in this connection that a certain 
small amount should be credited each year for earnings 
of the highway department outside the regular work, 
amounting in the year 1915 to a sum which brings the 
total expenditures slightly above $12,000. 

By referring to the detailed account of expenditures for 
each of these years, a reason for the increase is readily 
found. First, in the largely increased expenditures for 
material for highway construction, including crushed 
stone, oil and tarvia; and second, (and in a much lesser 
degree) to the increase in wages which has amounted, 
between the years 1909 and 1915, to about 30%, or from 
$1.75 per day to $2.25 per day. There has also been a 
considerable increase in the cost of keeping the town 
teams, due to the high prices prevailing during the last 
three or four years for hay and grain. 

In all other departments, with the exception of the 
Miscellaneous Account, the expenditures have been gener- 
ally quite uniform. 

In the years 1910, 1913, 1914 and 1915, the large ex- 
penditure on Miscellaneous Account was accounted for 
in 1910 by very large abatements of taxes; in the years 
1913 and 1914 by considerable expenditures on account 
of legal expenses and repairs of school buildings; and 
in the year 1915 the increase was for the same reason. 

It should be understood that the Miscellaneous Ac- 
count is a general account which absorbs any expenditure 
that cannot be properly classified in any other depart- 
ment; therefore the expenditures on this account will 
vary quite widely from year to year. 



51 



The street lighting account is one that has largely 
increased on account of the extension of street lighting. 

In connection with the Tree Warden account for these 
years, it should be noted that the expenditure has de- 
creased considerably, the net expenditure at the present 
time being about $2,500 per year. 

The question for each citizen to consider in connection 
with this showing is whether the expenditures on the 
various accounts can be held where they are now or 
safely reduced, or whether there must be an increase 
from year to year in order that the Town may have all 
that it needs and much that is superfluous. 

The total income for the years referred to above has 
been as follows: — 

For the total income of the Town from all sources 
during these years, reference is made to the Treasurer's 
Report as printed in the Annual Report of the Town 
officers, which is as follows: — 



52 



Receipts — 1909 



Received of County Treasurer for Dog Tax 






returned, 


$366.53 


a 


State Treasurer on account 






of Corporation Tax of 1908, 


1,083.67 


tt 


State Treasurer on account 






National Bank Tax of 1908, 


172.38 


a 


State Treasurer on account of 






Corporation Tax of 1909, 


7,084.23 


a 


State Treasurer on account 






National Bank Tax of 1909, 


775.39 


a 


State Treasurer on account of 






State Aid, 


96.00 


it 


For Tuition of Children, 


113.71 


a 


Income of Grammar School Fund, 48.82 


a 


Cambridge Assessment, 


178.54 


tt 


Janitor Service at Library, 


200.00 


a 


Anticipation of Tax Notes, 


20,000.00 


a 


Oil Barrels, 


107.54 


a 


Discount of Town Notes paid 






before Maturity, 


33.79 


a 


Gypsy Moth Work, 


3,029.09 


a 


Horse Sold, 


100.00 


a 


Crushed Stone sold, 


142.85 


a 


Highway Account, 


604.01 


tt 


Interest on Deposits, 


171.70 


a 


Balance of taxes of 1908, 


1,494.35 


it 


Interest on taxes of 1908, 


53.06 


it 


On account of taxes of 1909, 


33,154.73 


a 


For Interest on Taxes of 1909, 


31.42 




$71,287.36 



53 



Receipts — 191 o 

Received of County Treasurer for Dog Tax 

returned, $377.86 

State Treasurer on account of 

Corporation Tax of 1909, 522.99 

State Treasurer on account of 

Corporation Tax of 1910, 7,149 . 18 

State Treasurer on account of 

National Bank Tax of 1910, 
State Treasurer for State Aid, 
Income of Grammar School Fund, 
For Cambridge Assessment, 
For Janitor Service at Library, 
For Anticipation of Tax Note, 
For Gypsy Moth Work, 
For Highway Account, 
For Insurance Dividend, 
For Telephone Service, 
For broken Windows, 
For School Ticket returned, 
For sale of one Barrel Oil, 
For sale of old Lamps, 
For Hall Rent, 
For Annie A. Ray Legacy, 
For Wood sold from Cemetery, 
For Interest on Deposit, 
For Balance of Taxes for 1909, 
For Interest on Taxes 1909, 
On Account of Taxes, 1910, 
For Interest on Taxes of 1910, 



72 


.00 


d, 48.82 


162 


.31 


200 


.00 


10,000 


.00 


3,270.53 


234 


.23 


5.00 


4 


.09 




.60 


5 


85 


4 


75 


3.00 


31 


00 


300.00 


32 


50 


133 


90 


5,475 


03 


32 


93 


33,196.88 


25 


.19 


$63,125 


.77 



54 
Receipts — 1911 



ived of County Treasurer for Dog Tax 




returned, 


$384.77 


State Treasurer on account of 




Corporation Tax of 1910, 


228.45 


" State Treasurer on account of 




Corporation Tax of 1911, 


6,186.86 


State Treasurer on account of 




National Bank Tax of 1911, 


834.83 


" State Treasurer on account of 




" State Aid, 


48.00 


" State Treasurer on account of 




Sick Pauper, 


49.25 


" State Treasurer on account of 




tuition of Children, 


81.88 


" City of Boston on account of 




tuition of Children, 


41.00 


" City of Waltham on account of 




Poor, 


38.00 


" For Income of Grammar School 




Fund, 


48.82 


" For Cambridge Assessment, 


162.31 


" For Borrowed Money, 


20,000.00 


" Of Jenney Oil Co., for Barrels 




returned, 


25.50 


" For Barrels sold for Highway 




account, 


52.50 


" For Hall Rents, 


31.00 


" For Janitor at Library, 


200.00 


" For Lamps sold, 


1.50 


" For Court Fees, 


.90 


" For Dead Horse, 


3.00 


" For Telephone Service, 


3.94 


" For Fire Expense, 


12.40 


" For Licenses to Slaughter, 


4.00 



55 



Received 



For account of Gypsy Moth and 




Tree Department, 


$2,118.76 


For account of Highway Depart- 




ment, 


315.75 


For Maria L. Thompson, Legacy 




to Cemetery account, 


500.00 


For John H. Pierce, Legacy to 




Cemetery account, 


500.00 


For John H. Pierce, Legacy to 




Library account, 


1,000.00 


For Cemetery Maintenance, 


144.00 


For Interest on Deposit, 


151.76 


For Balance of Taxes of 1910, 


3,597.89 


For Interest on Taxes of 1910, 


53.49 


On account of Taxes, 1911, 


36,334.46 


For Interest on Taxes for 1911, 


27.75 


( 


$77,833 . 14 



56 

Receipts — 191 2 

Received of County Treasurer for Dog Tax 

returned, $380.05 

" State Treasurer on account of 

Corporation,Tax of 1911, 81 .74 

State Treasurer on account of 

Corporation Tax of 1912, 6,475 . 19 

State Treasurer on account of 

National Bank Tax of 1912, 856.77 



11 


State Treasurer on account 


of 






State Aid, 




48.00 


It 


State Treasurer on account 


of 






burial of State Pauper, 




15.00 


a 


State Treasurer on account 


of 






Tuition of Children, 




125.66 


tt 


State Treasurer on account 


of 






Gypsy and Brown Tail Moths, 


448.27 


a 


City of Boston for Tuition 


of 






Children, 




168.96 


Received for Income of Grammar School Fund 


I, 48.78 


u 


Hall Rent, 




50.00 


a 


Moth account, 




2,177.53 


a 


Highway account, 




1,285.48 


it 


Court Fees, etc., 




12.75 


tt 


License Fees, 




2.00 


a 


Borrowed Money, 




20,000.00 


tt 


Cambridge Assessment, 




194.77 


11 


Janitor, Service at Library, 




200.00 


a 


Interest on Deposits, 




152.48 


tt 


Balance of Taxes of 1911, 




337.80 


a 


Interest on Taxes of 1911, 




23.82 


a 


Taxes of 1912, 




46,161.41 


(( 


Interest on Taxes of 1912, 




25.38 


(C 


Special Sinking Fund and Interest, 

i 


, 2,311.47 




582,829.03 



57 



Receipts — 1913 



Received of County Treasurer for Dog Tax 






returned, 


$314.28 


Received for Corporation Taxes of 1912, 


258.72 


tt 


" 1913, 


6,115.63 


a 


National Bank Tax of 1913, 


961.50 


it 


State Aid, 


8.00 


Received of State Treasurer on account of 






Gypsy and Brown Tail Moths, 


14.63 


Received for Cambridge Assessment, 


178.54 


It 


Borrowed Money, 


20,000.00 


tt 


Income of Grammar School Fund, 


48.86 


a 


Court Fees, 


1.80 


a 


Prepayment of Note, 


31.94 


tt 


Account of Lee's Bridge, 


1,650.00 


it 


Account of Highway, 


926.77 


CI 


Account of Gypsy and Brown 






Tail Moths, 


2,054.99 


tt 


Hall Rent, 


30.00 


(( 


Tuition, 


3.00 


tt 


License to slaughter, 


1.00 


Receivec 


i of Miscellaneous for Schools, 


50.00 


(( 


Interest on Deposits, 


199.18 


tt 


Janitor at Library, 


200.00 


(i 


Balance Taxes of 1912, 


9,135.68 


(I 


Interest Taxes of 1912, 


157.83 


11 


On account of Taxes of 1913, 


45,053.16 


11 


For Interest on Taxes of 1913, 

J 


24.69 




589,235.80 



58 



Receipts — 1914 



Received 


I of County Treasurer for Dog Tax 






returned, 




$368.24 


(C 


State Treasurer on account 


of 






Corporation Tax, 




63.08 


li 


State Treasurer on account 


of 






Corporation Tax of 1914, 




5,135.59 


a 


State Treasurer on account 


of 






National Bank Tax, 




1,176.53 


a 


State Treasurer on account 


of 






Industrial School, 




32.50 


It 


State Treasurer for Tuition 


of 






Children, 




267.50 


it 


City of Boston for Tuition 


of 






Children, 




293.58 


Received for Cambridge Assessment, 




194.77 


it 


Anticipation of Tax notes, 




20,000.00 


tt 


Library Coal, 




121.60 


(< 


Highway account, 




529.88 


11 


Moth account, 




1,640.90 


it 


Hall Rent, 




48.00 


it 


License to slaughter, 




1.00 


it 


Interest on Deposits, 




153.71 


11 


Balance Taxes 1913, 




3,776.04 


tt 


Interest Taxes 1913, 




201.88 


it 


Taxes of 1914, 




44,514.40 


11 


Interest on Taxes of 1914, 


( 


50.28 




182,884.86 



59 



Receipts — 191 5 



Receivec 


I of County Treasurer for Dog Tax 






returned, 


• 


$378.12 


tt 


State Treasurer for balance Cor- 






poration Tax of 1914, 




132.71 


tt 


State Treasurer on account 


of 






Corporation Tax of 1915, 




4,529.23 


(( 


State Treasurer on account 


of 






National Bank Tax, 




929.15 


tt 


State Treasurer on account 


of 






Industrial Schools, 




175.50 


Received for Cambridge Assessment, 




194.77 


tt 


Income Grammar School Fund, 


49.96 


Receivec 


1 from Library for Coal, 




266.00 


Received for refund on Printing Bill, 




3.70 


a 


Town note in anticipation 


of 






Taxes, 




25,000.00 


a 


Moth account, 




1,349.02 


tt 


Highway Account, 




798.44 


tt 


Licenses to slaughter, 




2.00 


tt 


Court Fees, 




10.00 


tt 


Hall Rent, 




65.00 


a 


Interest on Deposits, 




309.40 


it 


Taxes of 1914, 




4,342.91 


tt 


Interest on Taxes of 1914, 




110.31 


a 


Taxes of 1915, 




48,985.76 


a 


Interest on Taxes of 1915, 




7.02 




$97,168.98 



60 



These figures show the total income, including the 
balance remaining in the Treasury, each year as follows : 



1909 


$71,287.36 


1910 


63,125.77 


1911 


77,833.14 


1912 


82,829.03 


1913 


89,235.80 


1914 


82,884.86 


1915 . 


97,168.98 



The above figures show increase in Receipts from the 
year 1909 to 1915 of about 35%, compared with Ex- 
penditures— 1909, $75,607.05—1915, $86,880.21, or an 
increase of about 15%. 

These figures are not strictly comparative, but for all 
practical purposes show the actual situation very clearly. 

At the last Annual Meeting several matters were 
referred to the Selectmen for consideration. 

First was under Article 15, which was — To see if the 
Town would appoint a Committee to suggest changes 
or additions to the By-laws and report to the next Town 
Meeting, or take any action in relation to the matter. 
The Board has considered this matter, and now recom- 
mend changes as follows: 

In Article 1, Section 1, which reads as follows: The 
Annual Town Meeting shall be held on the first Monday 
in March each year; The Board recommends that this 
section read as follows: The Annual Town Meeting shall 
be held on the second Monday in February each year. 

In Article 2, Section 1, which reads: The Financial 
year shall commence with the first day of February and 
end with the 31st day of January annually. The Board 
recommends that this Section read as follows: The 



61 

financial year shall commence with the first day of 
January and end with the 31st day of December annually. 

In Article 6, the Selectmen recommend that Section 2 
be entirely eliminated. 

In Article 9 the Selectmen recommend the addition of 
another Section as follows: That the Town authorize 
the Selectmen to issue licenses to junk dealers and peddlers 
doing business in the Town. 

The whole question of street lighting under Article 16 
of the Warrant for 1915 was referred to the Selectmen. 
The Board has, during the year, many times considered 
this subject, but have made no street lighting extensions 
for the reason that if all the extensions asked for were 
made, the total annual expense for this purpose would 
be so largely increased that their judgment did not 
commend such extensions. 

Under Article 17 of said Warrant, which was referred 
to the Selectmen, no action has been taken. 

Under Article 18, which reads: To see if the Town will 
widen old Winter Street at the corner opposite the house 
of Andrew J. Dougherty and appropriate money for the 
same. The Selectmen looked over the situation and 
were disposed to undertake the work if Mr. Dougherty 
was willing to have the location of the road changed across 
a part of his land which would give a clear line of vision 
in both directions; but as Mr. Dougherty did not 
approve of this change, and as it would be almost im- 
possible to improve present conditions with the location 
of the road as it now is, nothing whatever has been done 
by the Board. 

In conclusion, your Board is of the opinion that the 
Town matters have been generally conducted honestly 
and efficiently during the year, and that the various 
departments realize the responsibilities which they are 



62 



under to the Town. As an indication of the comparative 
smoothness with which things have run, no special town 
meetings have been called for during the year. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



INCREASE OF TAXATION 



ADDRESS 



AT 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



OF 



LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 

MARCH 8, 191 5 



BY 



CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS 



65 



INCREASE OF TAXATION 

The following address was made to the voters of the 
Town of Lincoln, Massachusetts, by Charles Francis 
Adams, at the Town Meeting held at Lincoln, on March 
8th, 1915: 

To the Citizens, Tax Payers and Inhabitants of Lincoln : 

It is now twenty-one years since I became a resident 
here; and in March, 1894, I attended my first annual 
Lincoln Town Meeting. For what I am about to submit, 
I will, therefore, take 1894 as a point from which to 
start. The aggregate of appropriations then recom- 
mended by the Board of Lincoln Selectmen was, in 
round numbers, $17,000; the similar recommendation 
for the current year aggregates $45,000. Lincoln's share 
of the State and County Tax of 1894 was $4,500; last 
year it was $13,000. In 1894, Lincoln's population was 
987, its valuation $2,600,000; its population is now 1,175, 
and its valuation has been increased to $4,000,000. In 
population, therefore, we have an increase of 19 per 
cent ; in valuation, an increase of 53 per cent, with close 
upon a threefold increase in taxation, — $58,000 in place 
of $21,500. As nearly as I am able to approximate, and 
taking the family of five as a unit, — a bread earner with 
four dependents, complete or partial, — the annual State 
and Town burden was in 1894 in the neighborhood of 
$109; it will this year be, approximately, $250. Yet in 
almost every report since 1894, the Board of Selectmen 
has not failed emphatically to call attention to a "largely 
increased" expenditure over that of previous years. 
And, I submit, Lincoln's experience is in this respect not 



66 

exceptional. Here, as elsewhere, the single question is, — 
How much longer can the process be continued? A 
present annual State and Muncipal assessment of S250 
on each family of a community is a fact indisputably 
suggestive. 

It is, however, possible that, for the purpose I now 
have in view, the year 1894 may to some seem remote. 
In this day of rapid movement twenty-one years carries 
us back to what is regarded by many as another period 
of existence, — a world altogether different from that 
which now is. I will, therefore, take a more recent date. 
I will come down to 1910, — a year within easy recollec- 
tion. In doing so, however, I shall adhere to the family 
as the unit of comparison. I do so for the simple reason 
that experience has taught how useless it is in this matter 
of public burdens to appeal to valuations, and the per- 
centage of assessment thereon. When you do so, you 
are invariably and at once met with much talk, mostly 
idle and ill-considered, of wealth undisclosed, and the 
mysterious "tax-dodger." We are solemnly assured that 
there are billions of property in concealment, and were 
it but forced into the open, the rate of assessment would 
immediately fall to one-quarter part, perhaps, of what 
it now is. Assuming then $2.00 on a hundred as an 
excessive rate, were all property disclosed and equally 
taxed, that rate would at once be reduced by three- 
quarters, resulting in a rate admittedly reasonable. 
This, as we all know, is the familiar, oft-repeated con- 
tention of the tax commissioner and the tax gatherer. 
If, however, recourse is had to the family as the unit, 
the argument, bad and fallacious at best, falls heavily 
to the ground. There is then no escape from the facts. 
In dollars and cents, the annual burden per family is, — 
so much! The thing speaks for itself. In the case of 
Lincoln, as I have already said, leaving national taxation 
for the moment out of consideration, it is now, as nearly 



67 



as can be ascertained, S2.50 a year. From that I start, 
and I will now take as a basis of further comparison the 
figures, not of 1894, but those of 1910. 

In the report for the Town fiscal year ending January 
31, 1909, our Board of Selectmen — Charles S. Smith, 
Charles Lee Todd and R. D. Donaldson — said: "We 
cannot call the attention of our citizens too strongly to 
the condition of the town Treasury and to the necessity 
for the greatest economy in expenditures. . . The time 
seems to be approaching when the annual tax rate of the 
town will be doubled." 

A Special Committee, consisting of the members of 
the Board of Selectmen, the Town Treasurer, and seven 
citizens at large, was then ordered, with instructions to 
inquire into the whole subject, reporting their con- 
clusions and recommendations. This Committee subse- 
quently used the following language: "The Selectmen 
very properly serve notice on the Town in unmistakable 
terms that, if this course [of public expenditure is 
further pursued, the tax rate will be doubled. It will in 
future be SI. 50 per hundred on the present valuation, 
instead of eighty cents as heretofore. " 

This was only five years ago. The steady and ap- 
parently irresistible increase of expenditure — National, 
State and Municipal — and consequent taxation have 
since been going on. Taking the family — five persons — 
as the unit, as the result of analysis, it would appear that 
the annual aggregate burden has increased 50 per cent 
in these five years, or by an average of 10 per cent each 
year. How long is this to continue? 

Take, for example, the State and County Tax. The 
record is suggestive; the outlook otherwise than en- 
couraging. In 1909, this burden in the case of Lincoln 
aggregated $7,800 as compared with $4,700 in 1894. 
Last year (1914) it was in excess of $13,000, an increase 
of 66 per cent over the tax in 1909, which again was an 



68 

increase of 66 per cent over the tax of 1895. An average 
annual increase of 4.5 per cent during the earlier period 
was accelerated to 12 per cent in the later. 

In our Town Meetings this State and County item 
is apt to be somewhat lightly dismissed from consider- 
ation as being something over which municipalities can 
exercise no control. Fixed by an outside and superior 
authority, the Town's only function, it is argued, is to 
appropriate, and pay. In this conclusion I do not concur, 
nor does it seem to accord with the ancient Massachu- 
setts Town Meeting spirit. We are constituents as well 
as payers of taxes; and, as a constituent body, we claim 
the prescriptive right of protest. That right, I submit, 
it is incumbent on us now to exercise. In furtherance 
of this view of the case, I shall presently submit a vote 
for the consideration of the Town. 

Finally, the National addition to our tax burdens re- 
mains to be considered. Levied indirectly, as well as 
directly, through Tariff duties, the Internal Revenue and 
the Income Tax, this levy can only be approximated. 
From the best available data now accessible and the 
computations of others, I should estimate it at $7.00 
annually per head, or $35 to the family unit now, as com- 
pared with $5.00 annually to the individual and $25 to 
the family unit, five years ago. 

It would thus appear that in the case of Lincoln, taking 
the family of five as the unit, the annual burden for the 
cost of government is now $285 as compared with $185 
five years ago, and $95 in 1894. 

Again, may it not unfairly be asked, how much further 
is this progressive movement to continue? It cannot go 
on indefinitely. Nor, as I have already said, is the ex- 
perience of Lincoln in any way exceptional. Has not 
the limit been reached, if, indeed, not already exceeded? 
Would the conclusion be unreasonable that if any further 
considerable increase of the burden takes place, wealth 



69 



will either evade the tax gatherer or leave the Common- 
wealth, while enterprise and productive industry will 
first languish and then seek, of necessity, other fields of 
activity? 

The foregoing, as well as the analysis and figures upon 
which the conclusions therein set forth are based, makes 
no claim to exact accuracy. Prepared at a distance from 
local records, it is approximate only, and, as such, sub- 
ject to verification. In the main, however, it is believed 
to be sufficiently accurate for present purposes. It is 
certainly suggestive. 



71 



SCHOOLS 



Payments 

C. S. Lyman, Services as Superintendent, $600 00 

Walter F. Brackett, Teaching, 440 00 

Priscilla Ames, Teaching, 570 00 

Marion Crawford, Teaching, 650 00 

Hattie B. Heath, Teaching, 650 00 

Katharine Works, Teaching, 600 00 

Helen Bowker, Teaching, 620 00 

Helen Jones, Teaching, 520 00 

Abbie P. Smith, Teaching, 240 00 

Ruth Shepard, Teaching, 4 00 

Bertha Wilson, Teaching, 48 00 

Boston and Maine R.R. School Tickets, 739 60 

Francis Bennett, Janitorship, South School, 123 70 

James B. Wheeler, Driving School Barge, 240 00 

Herman T. Wheeler, Driving School Barge, 506 00 

John F. Farrar & Son, Driving School Barge, 537 00 

Thomas J. Dee, Driving School Barge, 551 85 

Max Tankle, Carrying Pupil to School, 10 12 

Edward Bannon, Janitorship of School, 500 00 

James Diamond, Carrying Pupil to School, 17 50 

Miss S. M. Brooks, Carrying Pupil to School, 4 15 

Isaac B. Cook, Carrying Pupil to School, 17 50 

J. R. Hart well, Carrying Pupil to School, 17 50 

Elizabeth Connors, Carrying Pupil to School, 17 50 

John D. Fleming, Carrying Pupil to School, 17 50 

L. E. Brooks, Carrying Pupil to School, 17 50 
Doherty's Garage, Carrying Children to School, 797 25 



72 



F. E. Cousins & Co., Removing Ashes, 

National Express Co., Express, 

Town of Concord, Tuition, 

City of Waltham, Tuition, 

Boston & Maine R.R. Freight, 

James T. Laird, Services as Truant Officer, 1914, 

Waltham District Nursing Association, Services 

as Nurse, 
H. A. Wood, M. D., Professional Services, 
Helen P. Jones, Carfares from September to 

June 18, 1915, 
C. S. Lyman, Postage and Telephoning, 
William E. Chute, Cash paid for School Tickets, 
Lincoln Water Commissioners, Water Service, 
Roger Sherman, Removing Ashes, 
Edward R. Farrar, 1 y 2 cords cut wood, 
F. E. Cousins & Co., Coal, 
M. L. Snelling, Wood, 
Isaac N. MacRae, Labor and Supplies, 
Elizabeth Blodgett, Cash Paid for Painting 

Flag-pole, 
Elizabeth Blodgett, Taking School Census, 
E. B. MacLalan, Repairs, 
J. A. Burgess, Repairs on Barges, 
M. Steinmann, Repairs on Barges, 
J. P. Dwyer & Co., Repairs, 
T. J. McGann, Repairs, 
William Bulger, Painting Barge, 
W. C. Robus, Repairs on Bell, 
Singer Sewing Machine Co., Repairs, 
South Lincoln Dairy Co., Milk, 
Current Events, 40 Copies, 
E. Howard Clock Co., Repairs, 
Dutton & Clarke, Labor, 
James L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 
Peter Perry, Supplies, 



$5 50 


2 41 


3,406 35 


845 00 


1 62 


, 10 00 


17 80 


200 00 


37 72 


5 09 


, 10 32 


111 75 


10 35 


10 50 


2 25 


20 00 


149 29 


7 00 


15 00 


9 25 


15 00 


7 25 


120 00 


9 80 


56 00 


1 00 


1 80 


6 40 


8 00 


9 75 


5 94 


55 55 


1 75 



73 



Buttrick Lumber Co., Supplies, 

Jordan Marsh Co., Supplies, 

Chandler & Barber Co., Supplies, 

American Seating Co., Supplies, 

Elizabeth Blodgett, Supplies, 

Louis, Stoughton & Drake, Supplies, 

Edward E. Babb & Co., Supplies, 

Ginn & Co., Supplies 

W. Woodworth & Co., Supplies, 

A. R. McLeod, Supplies, 

Milton Bradley & Co., Supplies, 

Maurice S. Coburn, Supplies, 

J. L. Hammelt Co., Supplies, 

Palmer & Parker Co., Supplies, 45 13 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 7 73 

Marcy Coal Co., Coal, 350 00 



HIGHWAYS 



Payments 



$78 56 


22 93 


14 76 


23 50 


2 89 


9 92 


179 31 


15 11 


1 60 


5 34 


2 57 


6 75 


21 34 



Total, $15,019 55 



William H. Sherman, Superintendent of 

Streets, $1,169 70 

Timothy Ahearn, Labor, 702 00 

Martin J. Rooney, Labor, 702 00 

Joseph Mahan, Labor, 526 50 

John W. Rooney, Sr., Labor, 596 25 

William H. Ryan, Labor, 558 00 

Patrick Craven, Labor, 420 50 



74 

Jerry Moynihan, Labor, 

James Diamond, Labor, 

Dennis Dougherty, Labor, 

Francis Moynihan, Labor, 

Charles Rooney, Labor, 

John W. Rooney, Jr., Labor, 

Charles P. Farnsworth, Care of Town Horses, 

F. E. Cousins & Co., Grain, 

Daniel McAskill, Shoeing and Repairing, 

J. A. Burgess, Shoeing and Repairing, 

John MacComber, Repairs, 

F. H. Cunningham, Labor, 

National Express Co., Express, 

Boston & Maine R. R., Freight, 

Boston & Maine R. R., Demurrage, 

Charles S. Koglund, Inspecting Boiler at Crusher, 

B. W. Brown, Grain, 

D. E. Sherman, Hay, 

E. A. Sherman, Hay, 
James E. Baker, Hay, 
W. E. Peterson, Professional Services, 
J. S. Hart, M. D., Rent of Barn, 
H. S. Alderman, Medical Attendance, 
Town of Concord, Services of Steam Roller, 
Lincoln Water Works, Water at Town Barn, 
Lincoln Water Works, Water at Stone Crusher, 
J. S. Hart, M. D., Pasturage of Town Horse, 
Estella Brooks, Rent of Land for Crusher, 
L. E. Brooks, Crushed Stone, 
Michael Connors, Crushed Stone, 
Max Tankle, Crushed Stone, 
John Wilson, Crushed Stone, 
John Fleming, Crushed Stone, 
George C. Cunningham, Crushed Stone, 
Elmer Bean, Crushed Stone, 

C. S. Wheeler, Crushed Stone, 



$213 75 


19 00 


15 75 


9 00 


7 75 


20 25 


260 00 


431 68 


45 55 


215 50 


73 60 


382 32 


55 


98 48 


10 93 


r, 5 00 


583 89 


155 12 


169 33 


94 40 


12 00 


125 00 


4 00 


243 22 


12 00 


10 00 


12 00 


25 00 


98 75 


33 70 


72 30 


46 80 


5 00 


43 05 


8 50 


35 40 



75 



C. R. Butcher, Crushed Stone, 
Lexington Lumber Co., Supplies, 
Eagle Oil & Supply Co., Supplies, 

C. N. Carpenter Supply Co., Supplies 
Benjamin Pike, Supplies, 
Morgan Bond Co., Supplies, 
Ames Implement & Seed Co., Supplies, 
Peter Perry, Supplies, 

New England Road Machine Co., Supplies, 
Mrs. M. A. Sherman, Gravel, 
Mrs. Annie Morrissey, Gravel, 
Flint Bros., Gravel, 
T. A. Calkins, Gravel, 
Herbert W. Farrar, Gravel, 
Barrett Mfg. Co., Tarvia, . 
Waltham Trap Rock Co., Crushed Stone, 
Winchester Rock & Brick Co., Crushed Stone, 
John Baker, Road Oil, 
Kidder Bros, Coal, 
Waltham Coal Co., Coal, 
Frank Wheeler, Coal, 
Andrew J. Dougherty, Labor, 
Robert D. Donaldson, Labor, 

D. E. Sherman, Labor, 
Martin Sherman, Labor, 
I. N. MacRae, Labor, 
John F. Farrar, Labor, 

Total, 



$ 30 00 


78 89 


22 77 


253*40 


8 65 


2 35 


24 76 


26 00 


147 05 


45 00 


24 75 


18 75 


35 25 


7 50 


2,253 42 


1,267 23 


66 56 


745 55 


16 25 


22 40 


10 70 


6 00 


155 52 


26 00 


2 25 


7 48 


2 25 


$13,580 25 



76 



MOTHS 



Payments 

John J. Kelliher, Superintendent of Labor, 

John J. Kelliher, Services of Auto Truck, 

Fritz Cunnert, Labor, 

John Cannair, Labor, 

Henry Butcher, Labor, 

Byron Lunt, Labor, 

James Ryan, Labor, 

Highway Department, Rent of Barn, 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co., Telephone Service, 

Robert D. Donaldson, Filing Saws, 

J. M. MacComber, Filing Saws, 

Torrey & Vialle, Supplies, 

Fitzhenry-Guptill Co., Supplies, 

Standard Oil Co., Gasoline, 

Doherty's Garage, Delivering Freight, 

J. A. Burgess, Labor on Sprayer, 

D. E. Sherman, Labor of Team, 
I. N. MacRae, Labor and Supplies, 

E. A. Sherman, Labor of Team, 
John F. Farrar & Son, Labor of Men, 
M. L. Snelling, Labor of Team, 
John M. MacComber, Repairs, 



Total, 



$888 


00 


95 00 


548 


75 


651 


25 


637 


50 


156 25 


564 00 


25 


00 


e, 13 


44 


13 


75 


2 


05 


3 


00 


1 


26 


27 


50 


4 


15 


13 


75 


179 


75 




85 


33 


00 


76 


50 


98 


51 


2 


55 


14,035 


81 



77 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Payments 



Edward Bannon, Janitorship of Public Buildings 

and Grounds, 
Robert B. Johnson, Repairs on Clocks, 
Edison Electric Light Co., Services of Light — 

Town Hall, 
Charles E. Woodhull, Care of Piano— 1914, 
F. H. Cunningham, Blasting Rocks, 
James T. Laird, 6 Fire Extinguishers, 
James T. Laird, Supplies, 
C. S. Wheeler, Policy of Penn. Insurance Co., 
New England Tel. & Tel. Co., Services of 3 

Telephones, 
Lincoln Post Office, Box Rent, 
Joseph S. Hart, M. D., Returning Births, 
Robert D. Donaldson, Raising and Lowering 

Flag-pole— 1914, 
John F. Farrar, Cash paid for Auto Hire, 
E. W. Prescott, Information furnished Assessors 
James L. Chapin & Son, Policy 256476 (Merri- 
mack Fire Ins. Co.) 
George E. Crosby Co., Printing, 
John F. Farrar, Cash paid for Express on Ballots, 
Mass. Bonding Co., Treasurers' Bond, 
William Craig, Fees and Expenses of William 

Murdock, 
Robert D. Donaldson, Labor on Town Scales, 
M. L. Snelling, Coal, 
James T. Laird, Collecting Dog-tax, 
James T. Laird, Posting Warrants, 
James T. Laird, Services — July 3rd, 



$674 92 


3 


00 


120 


70 


7 


60 


10 


00 


48 


00 


1 


50 


12 


57 


48 


75 




90 




00 


15 


00 


18 


00 


, 9 


42 


17 


98 


488 


27 


i 


24 


75 


00 


3 


65 


4 50 


16 00 


25 


00 


6 


00 


4 


00 



78 



James T. Laird, Care of Stray Dogs, 

James T. Laird, Services at March Meeting, 

James T. Laird, Services as Constable, 

George E. Cunningham, Services as Constable, 

George E. Cunningham, Labor on Bicycle Case, 

George E. Cunningham, Responding to call at 

D. Holman's, 
Martin M. Welch, Inspecting Cattle— 1914, 
C. S. Wheeler, Certification of note, 
Walter Sherman, Special Police— 1914, 
F. H. Cunningham, Special Police — 1914, 
John F. Farrar, Special Police — 1914, 
P. B. Murphy, Printing, 
W. and L. E. Gurley, Supplies, 
Loyd Monahan, Typewriting Selectmen's Re- 
port— 1914 
Thomas Groom & Co., Printing, 
Herman T. Wheeler, Services as Ballot Clerk, 

March 1, 
I. N. MacRae, Labor at Town Hall, 
E. & F. King Co., Supplies, 
Gilbert A. A. Pevey, Legal Services, Lincoln, 

Chapin, et at, 
Marcy Coal Co., Coal, 
A. J. Doherty, Legal Services, Lincoln, Chapin 

and Parish, 
Winslow A. Eaton, Care of Hose, 
Tuttle's Stable Co., Barge — Decoration Day, 
W. H. Brewster & Co., Insurance on Old School- 
house, 
Thomas L. Giles, Services at March Meeting, 
Herbert G. Farrar, Services at March Meeting, 
Thomas J. Dee, Services at March Meeting, 
John F. Farrar & Son, Housing Hose, 
John F. Farrar, Labor of Man, 
Herbert G. Farrar, Reward, 



$5 00 


5 00 


25 00 


25 00 


3 00 


2 50 


34 86 


2 00 


15 00 


15 00 


15 00 


7 40 


25 21 


7 00 


5 62 


5 00 


6 84 


11 26 


100 00 


278 65 


75 00 


10 00 


6 60 


60 80 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


10 00 


2 25 


100 00 



79 



Amos Holman, Services of Auto truck, 

Robert D. Donaldson, Labor at Town Hall, 

A. W. Brownell, Printing, 

Waltham Publishing Co., Printing, 

C. S. Smith, iy 2 tons coal @$6.55, 

C. S. Smith, Cash paid for Postage, 

John J. Kelliher, Court fees, 

James T. Laird, Sharpening Lawn Mower, 

Thomas Groom & Co., Assessors' Books, 

Highway Department, Teaming Coal, 

John J. Kelliher, Services as Police — 1914, 

Herman T. Wheeler, Services at Primaries, 

Thomas L. Giles, Services at Primaries, 

Herbert G. Farrar, Services at Primaries, 

James W. Lennon, Services at Primaries, 

C. S. Wheeler, Abatement of taxes, 

A. J. Doherty, Expenses, Land Court, 

F. H. Cunningham, Preambulating Town lines, 

John F. Farrar, Preambulating Town lines, 

Robert D. Donaldson, Preambulating Town lines, 20 00 

W. C. Robus, Repairing Footlights, 

Henry F. Bryant, Surveying, 

John J. Kelliher, Fees and Expenses, Charles 

Conlon, 
James W. Lennon, Services at Nov. Election, 
Thomas J. Dee, Services at Nov. Election, 
Thomas L. Giles, Services at Nov. Election, 
Herbert G. Farrar, Services at Nov. Election, 
George E. Cunningham, Services at Nov. Election, 
Robert D. Donaldson, Labor on Stone Wall, 
Robert D. Donaldson, Labor and Supplies at 

School, 
Robert D. Donaldson, Labor at Town Scales, 
C. S. Wheeler, Services as Treasurer, 
C. S. Wheelei, Collecting Taxes, 
C. S. Wheeler, Postage, etc., 



$3 00 


282 69 


2 00 


2 50 


47 16 


4 22 


2 00 


1 25 


6 36 


70 00 


35 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


394 79 


27 50 


2 00 


20 00 


, 20 00 


75 


60 37 


5 20 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


, 5 00 


106 85 


980 40 


36 56 


300 00 


721 80 


11 20 



15 00 


10 50 


8 60 


20 00 


40 


14 00 


1 70 



80 



C. S. Wheeler, Policy, Penn. Fire Insurance Co., $12 50 
Robert D. Donaldson, Raising and Lowering 

Flag-pole, 1915, 
Carter, Carter & Meigs, Supplies 
Charles Woodhull, Tuning Piano, 1915, 
M. H. Doherty, Services as Sealer of Weights 

and Measures, 
National Express Company, Express, 
Martin M. Welch, Inspecting Cattle, 1915, 
C. S. Smith, Cash paid for Supplies, 
C. S. Smith, Services as Selectman, Overseer 

and Registrar, 185 00 

John F. Farrar, Services as Selectman, Overseer 

and Registrar, 185 00 

R. D. Donaldson, Services as Selectman, Overseer 

and Registrar, 
F. H. Cunningham, Labor, Fighting Fires, 
Frank Monello, Labor, Fighting Fires, 
W. E. Chute, Labor Fighting Fires, 
W. C. Robus, Labor Fighting Fires, 
George N. Sherman, Labor, Fighting Fires, 
T. W. Smith, Labor Fighting Fires, 
Louis Rowe, Labor Fighting Fires, 
Martin Sherman, Labor, Fighting Fires, 
John Johnson, Labor Fighting Fires, 
A. P. Peterson, Labor Fighting Fires, 
Wendell Crowell, Labor Fighting Fires, 
John Coane, Jr., Labor Fighting Fires, 
William J. Bennett, Labor Fighting Fires, 
F. E. Cousins & Co., Labor Fighting Fires to 

April, 1915, 
Isaac N. MacRae, Labor Fighting Fires, 
F. E. Cousins & Co., Labor Fighting Fires to 

Jan. 1, 1916, 
Winslow A. Eaton, Care of Hose, 1915, 
Doherty' s Garage, Auto trips to Fires, 



185 00 


7 20 


2 40 


1 60 


8 60 


10 80 


7 40 


4 80 


8 00 


2 40 


2 40 


3 00 


4 20 


2 00 


28 60 


33 80 


35 60 


8 00 


7 00 



81 



M. L. Snelling, Labor Fighting Fires, 
Nicholas Cotoni, Labor Fighting Fires, 
Andrew J. Dougherty, Labor Fighting Fires, 
Thomas J. Dee, Labor Fighting Fires, 
W. H. Sherman, Services as Assessor, 
W. C. Pierce, Services as Assessor, 
C. S. Wheeler, Services as Assessor, 
George L. Chapin, Services as Town Clerk, 
James L. Chapin & Son, Supplies for Town Hall, 
J. D. Tilton, M. D., Returning Birth, 
James W. Lennon, Services as Auditor, 



Total, 



$12 80 


5 60 


38 20 


18 80 


50 00 


75 00 


51 50 


85 00 


541 


25 


125 00 


7,004 83 


\ 



STREET LIGHTS 



Payments 



Edison Electric Light Co., Service of light for 

November and December, 1914, $291 23 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service of light for 

January, 1915, 145 97 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service of light for 

February, 140 10 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service of light for 

March, 133 10 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service of light for 

April, 139 03 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service of light for 

May, 133 80 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service of light for 

June, 128 85 



82 



Edison Electric Light Co., Service of light for 

July, $131 73 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service of light for 

August, 132 61 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service of light for 

September, 132 26 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service of light for 

October, 140 51 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service of light for 

November, 144 59 



Total, $1,793 78 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Payments 



Martin M. Welch, Inspecting Meat, $149 50 

Martin M. Welch, Inspecting Cattle, 13 75 
Martin M. Welch, Fummigating Closets, Houses 

and Troughs, 19 00 

Martin M. Welch, Posting Notices of Scarlet 

Fever, 6 25 

Carter, Carter & Meigs, Supplies, 7 00 

Total, $195 50 



83 



LIBRARY 



Payments 

John F. Farrar, Treasurer, Dog Tax Collected, $378 12 
John F. Farrar, Treasurer, Appropriation, 1,000 00 



Total, $1,378 12 



CEMETERY 



Payments 



Roger Sherman, Labor, 

Samuel Demas, Labor, 

John F. Farrar & Son, Labor, 

I. N. MacRae, Repairing Faucet, 

Lincoln Water Commissioners, Water Service, 

Lincoln Water Works, Pipe and Fixtures, 

Fritz Cunnert, Sharpening Mower, 

George E. Crosby Co., Printing, 



Total, $597 32 



$407 61 


16 


87 


108 00 




85 


20 


00 


27 39 


3 


60 


13 


00 



84 



NEW SCHOOLHOUSE BONDS 



Payments 
First National Bank, Schoolhouse Bonds, $3,000 00 



INTEREST 



Payments 
First National Bank, Discount on Note, $569 03 



COUPONS ON SCHOOLHOUSE BONDS 



Payments 



C. S. Wheeler, Treasurer, Coupons, Schoolhouse 

Bonds, January 1st, $740 00 

C. S. Wheeler, Treasurer, Coupons, Schoolhouse 

Bonds, July 1, 680 00 

Total, $1,420 00 



85 
SUPPORT OF POOR 



Payments 



Elizabeth Blodgett, Cash paid by order of State 

Board to Richard Lopez, $13 74 

Agnes Gilbert, On account of Mother's Aid, 45 00 

Total, $58 74 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Payments 



Henry K. Barnes & Co., Supplies, $110 00 

Salary of 34 Firemen, 68 00 



WALTHAM HOSPITAL 



Total, $178 00 



Payments 
Waltham Hospital, Appropriation, $250 00 



86 



HYDRANTS AND OTHER WATER SERVICE 



Payments 



Lincoln Water Works, Water Service, Town Hall, $50 00 
Lincoln Water Works, 122 Hydrants, 1,830 00 

Lincoln Water Works, Watering Troughs, 540 04 



Total, $2,420 04 



BORROWED MONEY 



Payments 



First National Bank, Note, Anticipation of 

Taxes, $25,000 00 



87 



RECAPITULATION 



Payments 




Schools, 


$15,019 55 


Highways, 


13,580 25 


Water, 


10,395 24 


Borrowed Money, 


25,000 00 


Miscellaneous, 


7,004 83 


Moths, 


4,035 81 


Schoolhouse Bonds, 


3,000 00 


Coupons on Schoolhouse Bonds, 


1,420 00 


Hydrants and other Water Service, 


2,404 04 


Interest, 


569 03 


Street Lights, 


1,793 78 


Library, 


1,378 12 


Cemetery, 


597 32 


Waltham Hospital, 


250 00 


Board of Health, 


195 50 


Fire Department, 


178 00 


Support of Poor, 


58 74 


Total, 


$86,880 21 



88 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS AND 

MEAT 



December 23, 1915. 



To the Hon. Board of Health: — 



I herewith submit the following report of animals 
slaughtered during the year 1915: 



Pigs . 














725 


Calves 














112 


Cows 














60 


Bulls . . . 














2 


Sheep 














3 


Pigs condemned 














13 


Calves condemned . 




' 










5 


Cows condemned 














4 



MARTIN M. WELCH, 

Member of the Board of Health. 



89 



REPORT OF ANIMALS SLAUGHTERED. 



December 23, 1915. 
To the Hon. Board of Health: — 

I herewith submit the following report of animals 
slaughtered in October, November and December, 1915. 
1915: 



Oct. 4. 


C. 0. Sargent. 


Calves, 


2 


Oct. 20. 


u 


Calves, 


3 


Nov. 3. 


a 


Pigs, 


.6 


Nov. 3. 


(( 


Calves, 


1 


Nov. 3. 


tt 


Cows, 


1 


Nov. 6. 


tt 


Pigs, 


6 


Nov. 6. 


T. C. Cunnert. 


Pigs, 


4 


Nov. 8. 


C. 0. Sargent. 


Calves, 


1 


Nov. 8. 


ii 


Cows, 


2 


Nov. 12. 


a 


Calves, 


1 


Nov. 20. 


t( 


Calves, 


1 


Nov. 20. 


T. C. Cunnert. 


Pigs, 


7 


Nov. 22. 


C. 0. Sargent. 


Pigs, 


2 


Nov. 26. 


u 


Pigs, 


8 


Nov. 27. 


T. C. Cunnert. 


Pigs 


12 


Dec. 3. 


C. 0. Sargent. 


Pigs, 


7 


Dec. 7. 


tt 


Pigs (2 pigs condemned 








and buried) 


23 


Dec. 7. 


C. 0. Sargent. 


Calves, 


5 


Dec. 7. 


tt 


Cows, 


1 


Dec. 9. 


a 


Pigs, 


4 


Dec. 9. 


tt 


Calves, 


1 


Dec. 11. 


tt 


Pigs, 


4 



90 



Dec. 11. 


T. C. Cunnert. 


Pigs, 


4 


Dec. 11. 


a 


Calves, 


1 


Dec. 13. 


C. 0. Sargent. 


Pigs, 


10 


Dec. 13. ' 


C. 0. " 


Calves, 


1 


Dec. 13. 


a 


Cows (1 cow condemned 








boiled for hens) 


1 


Dec. 14. 


C. 0. Sargent. 


Pigs, 


23 


Dec. 15. 


u 


Pigs, 


4 


Dec. 15. 


u 


Calves, 


1 


Dec. 17. 


CI 


Pigs (3 pigs condemned 








and buried) 


34 


Dec. 18. 


C. 0. Sargent. 


Pigs, 


77 


Dec. 18. 


T. C. Cunnert. 


Pigs, 


6 


Dec. 18. 


a 


Calves, 


1 


Dec. 20. 


C. 0. Sargent. 


Pigs (1 pig condemned 








and buried) 


37 


Dec. 22. 


C. 0. Sargent. 


Pigs, 


31 


Dec. 22. 


u 


Calves, 


2 


Dec. 22. 


(( 


Cows, 


1 



MARTIN M. WELCH, 

Member of the Board of Health 



91 
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF FIRE ENGINEERS 

To the Board of Selectmen: — 

The Board of Fire Engineers herewith submit their 
eighth annual report, ending January 31, 1916. 

Force 

Thirty-four men belong to the department : one chief, 
four engineers and 29 call men. There are three organ- 
ized companies. 

Apparatus 

The apparatus belonging to the Department is as 
follows: — Four hose carriages, 25 fire extinguishers, four 
ladders, one harness, hose, axes and plaster hooks. 

Location of Apparatus 

No. 1. Hose house, old schoolhouse, Lincoln Centre. 
No. 2. Kept at F. E. Cousins' grain store, So. Lincoln. 
No. 3. Hose house, John Dee farm, Virginia Road, 

North Lincoln. 
No. 4. Kept at John Farrar's, South Lincoln. 

Fires 

Two barns and one house at a loss of about $8,000. 

We would recommend that the Town purchase a 
motor truck as each year it has been found harder to 
procure horses. 

ISAAC N. MACRAE, Chief, 
THOMAS DEE, 
HERBERT FARRAR, 
HAROLD S. COUSINS, 
J. J. KELLIHER. 



92 

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 

To the Board of Selectmen : — 

I herewith submit the following report for the year 
ending December 31, 1915. 

Last spring the roads were in very good condition, 
owing to the fact that there was hardly any mud. There 
were not many ruts to fill, so that we began to build 
crushed stone roads early in the spring. I have used 
about 1,200 loads of sand and gravel for covering tarvia, 
and building gravel roads in different parts of the town, 
and for widening the road near Baker Bridge. I have 
used 35 cars of crushed stone, purchased from the 
Waltham and Winchester Rock Companies, besides 
what stone we crushed at the town crusher. I have had 
10 guide boards repainted this year, and several new 
ones made and put where they were needed. 

The following payments have been made during the 
year : — 

Hay, grain and straw, approximately $1,386 00 

Stone and gravel, 2,038 00 

Tarvia and oil, 2,939 00 

Supplies, etc., 777 00 

Rent, 150 00 

Express, freight, etc., 122 00 

Steam roller, 243 00 
Repairs on carts, harnesses, and shoeing 

horses, 376 00 

Superintendent's salary, labor, and snow 

work, etc., 5,419 00 

$13,450 00 



93 



The sum-total of what has been paid into the 
Town Treasury, and what is still due for 
labor, material, etc., is approximately, $850 00 

Amount paid for bills for stone on hand for 

Spring use, is approximately, 300 00 



$1,150 00 



Amount expended on highways for year is 

approximately, $12,300 00 

The following is a list of places where the money has 
been expended: 

Building Gravel Roads : 



Tower Road, 


1,800 Feet 


Road near C. S. Wheeler's 


700 " 


Old County Road 


400 " 


Cross Road near Mr. Cunnert's 


400 " 


Turnpike 


750 " 


and widening road near Baker Bridge. 




Building Crushed Stone Roads : 




Turnpike 


2,100 Feet 


Road near Max TankeFs 


1,000 " 


Lexington Road near H. T. Wheeler's 


800 " 


Bedford Road 


700 " 


Road near T. J. Dee's 


600 " 


South Great Road 


800 " 


Sandy Pond Road 


750 " 


Road near Mr. Storrow's 


500 " 



Tarvia Macadam Road 

Road from center of town to E. C. Wheeler's 4,500 Feet 
Concord Road near E. R. Farrar's 2,000 " 

(This road averages about 14 feet wide.) 



94 



We have scraped most of the roads in town, cleaned 
out the gutters, and put in culverts and drain-pipes 
where they were needed. 

The stone crusher had to be overhauled and reset on 
new timbers, and a shed built to cover the machinery 
and belts, making the plant look more tidy than hereto- 
fore. 

We have seven carloads of crushed stone in the south 
part of the town for spring use, and about 200 tons, which 
have been teamed from the crusher to other parts of the 
town, and about 400 tons in the crusher yard, that have 
not been crushed at the writing of this report. 

The highway department is in about the same con- 
dition as last year. It consists of 6 horses, 4 sets of 
double harness, 1 single cart harness, 1 express harness, 
1 express saddle, 3 double carts, 1 single cart, 1 oil 
wagon for spraying the streets, 1 two-horse sled, 1 one- 
horse sled, 2 snow plows, 1 road-scraper, 1 roller, 6 
stable blankets, 6 street blankets, horse covers ; and picks, 
shovels, etc. 

In my last report, I recommended that the sum of 
$12,000 be appropriated each year. It seems to me that 
it is of little use to build gravel roads where automobile 
travel is very great, as the automobiles tear up the road 
so badly. If we build roads that will last for any length 
of time, we must use stone and some kind of binder to 
hold it. If we make the sum much less than $12,000, 
we cannot build much roadway that will stand the 
traffic of to-day. We could patch up the roads, and 
put on what dust-laying material is called for. There- 
fore, I shall recommend the sum of $12,000 for the year 
1916, and earnestly request that your board recommend 
that sum. 

Yours respectfully, 
WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



95 



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96 



Report of the Commissioners of Sinking and 
Trust Funds 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS. 
In Account with 
TOWN OF LINCOLN 

1915. Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance 

Coupons, Town of Lincoln 3|s 
Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s, 1917 
Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s (Serial) . 
Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s, 1936 
Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4s. 
Coupons, New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 5s . 
$3,000 New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 5s, due 
$500 Town of Lincoln, Serial 4s, due 
Cash, C. S. Wheeler, Treasurer 
Interest on deposit 

1915. Cr. 

Dec. 31. Balance 

$2,000 New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 5s 
$3,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, 1936 . 
$2,000 American Tel. & Tel. 4s 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

$4,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4s, 1929. 
$4,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, Serial Bonds, due 1912 to 1923. 
$14,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due September, 1936. 
$3,000 Town of Lincoln 3§s, due September, 1932. 
$2,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due June 1917. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



$1,017.24 


105.00 


80.00 


180.00 


440.00 


40.00 


75.00 


3,000.00 


500.00 


1,500.00 


43.67 


$6,980.91 


$51.01 


2,035.42 


3,034.92 


1,859.56 


$6,980.91 



97 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 
In Account with 
FUND FOR EXTRA SCHOOLHOUSE BONDS 

1915 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $410.59 

Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s 280 . 00 

Dec. 31. Interest on deposit 17.32 

$707.91 

1915. * Cr. 
Dec. 31. Balance $707.91 

The Fund is invested as follows : 

$2,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1924. 
$2,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1925. 
$2,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1926. 
$1,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1927. 

Respectfully submitted; 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



98 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

GEORGE G. TARBELL LEGACY TO THE 
LINCOLN LIBRARY. 



1915. 
Jan. 



1915. 
Dec. 



Dr. 

Balance 

Dividends, West End St. Railway common 
Dividends, American Tel. & Tel. Co. . 
Dividends, West End St. Railway pfd. 
Dividends, Boston & Lowell R. R. Co. 
Coupons, United Fruit 4£s, 1923 . 
Interest on deposit 



Cr. 
31. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library 
Balance on deposit, principal account . 



$29.60 

3.50 

32.00 

52.00 

64.00 

22.50 

4.22 

$207.82 



$178.22 

29.60 

$207.82 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

8 shares Boston & Lowell Railroad Co. 
13 shares West End Street Railway Co., preferred. 
8 shares New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 
4 shares American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
1 share West End Street Railway Co. common. 
$500 United Fruit Co. 4£s, 1923. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer,. 



99 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

GEORGE RUSSELL LEGACY TO THE LINCOLN 

LIBRARY 



1915. 
Jan. 1. 


Dr. 

Balance 

Dividends, Fitchburg Railroad Co. 
Interest 

Cr. 
Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library 
Balance on deposit, principal account . 


$33.02 

26.25 

1.30 

$60.57 


1915. 
Dec. 31. 


$27.55 
33.02 

$60.57 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

7 shares Fitchburg Railroad Co., preferred. 

2 shares New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



100 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

JULIA A. BEMIS FUND FOR BENEFIT OF 
" LINCOLN LIBRARY 

1915. Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $7.25 

Dividends, West End St. Railway common . 7 . 00 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. Co. . 40.00 

Interest .71 

$54.96 



1915. Cr. 

Dec. 31, Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library $47.71 

Balance on deposit, principal account . 7 . 25 

$54.96 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4s, due 1929. 
2 shares West End Street Railway Co., common. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



101 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY TO THE LINCOLN- 
LIBRARY 



1915. 




Dr. 




Jan. 


1. 


Dividend, West End St. Railway, common. 


$3.50 






Coupon, General Gas & Electric Co. 6s. 


60.00 






Interest 


.32 






Cr. 


S63.82 


1915. 




Dec. 


31. 


Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library 


S63.82 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

1 share West End Street Railway Co., common. 
$1,000 General Gas & Electric Co. 6s, due 1916. 



Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



102 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR LINCOLN 

LIBRARY 



1915. 




Dr. 




Jan. 


1. 


Balance 


$19.40 






Dividends, West End St. Railway, common . 


17.50 






Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 


40.00 






Coupons Pennsylvania Railroad Conv. 3£s. 


29.17 






$1,000 Pennsylvania Railroad Conv. 3£s due. 


1,000.00 






Interest 


1.45 
$1,107.52 


1915. 




Cr. 




Dec. 


29. 


$1,000 American Tel. & Tel. 4s, 1929 . 


$929.78 




31. 


Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library . 


88.12 






Balance on deposit, principal account . 


89.62 
$1,107.52 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

$2,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4s, due 1929. 
5 shares West End Street Railway Co., common. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



103 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR SILENT 

POOR. 

1915. Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $253.33 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4s . 40 . 00 

Coupons, Pennsylvania R. R. Co. Conv. 35s. 29.17 

$1,000 Pennsylvania Railroad Conv. 3£s due. 1,000 . 00 

Interest 7.99 

$1,330.49 

1915. Cr. 

May 13. Cash, Selectmen's order $10.00 

Dec. 29. $1,000 American Tel. & Tel. 4s, 1929 . 929.78 

Balance on deposit, income account 275 . 49 

Balance on deposit, principal account . 115.22 

$1,330.49 
The Fund is invested as follows: 

$2,000 American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4s, due 1929. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



104 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR TOWN 
HEARSE. 

1915. Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $110.32 

Dividend, Pennsylvania Railroad Co. . . 33 . 00 

Interest on deposit 3.68 

~$147T00 

1915. Cr. 
Dec. 31. Balance on deposit $147.00 

The Fund is invested as follows: 

11 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



105 

THE BEMTS LECTURE FUND TRUSTEES 
In Account with 
THE BEMIS LECTURE FUND 



1915. 
Jan. 



Dr. 



1. Balance 
Dividends 



1915. 




Jan. 


2 




18 




19 




27 


Feb. 


1 




5 




11 




25 


March 


4 




18 


April 


1 




13 


May 


6 


June 


30 


July 


4 


Oct. 


16 




27 


Nov. 


1 




4 



Pennsylvania Railroad. 
Boston & Providence R. R. 
Fitchburg Railroad pfd. 
Old Colony R. R. . 
Boston & Albany R. R. 
American Tel. & Tel. Co. 
Boston & Lowell R. R. 
West End St. Ry. pfd . 
New York Railways 4s 
Utah Co. 6s . 
Southern Railways 4s . 
" New York Ry. Adj. 

Interest on deposit .... 



Coupons, 



Cr. 
Atlanta University Quartette, (Nov. 14, 1914) 
P. A. Carter, Envelopes, Labor 

Cottar's Saturday Night 

Frederick M onsen 

Powell Printing Co., 400 programs 
A. P. Peterson, loan of plants. 

Frederic Poole, Lecture 

Frank L. Duley, Lecture 

The Webster-Brooks Trio & Concert Co. . 
Arthur L. Griffith, Lecture .... 
A. D. Handy, Lantern and expenses 

The Raweis 

Doherty Garage to date 

Powell Printing Co., Programs .... 
P. A. Carter, Postals and Labor for July 4th 

Maynard Brass Band 

Peerless Oratorio Artists 

W. F. Allan & Co., Postals and Printing 
W. E. Robertson, Stamped Envelopes and Labor 
Lieut. A. H. Miles, Lecture .... 
Powell Printing Co., Programs — 1915 . 



$1,079.97 

150 00 

100.00 

50.00 

70.00 

87.50 

480.00 

240.00 

40.00 

40.00 

180.00 

120.00 

125.56 

24.0 6 

$2,787.09 



$30.00 

2.85 

125.00 

100.00 

10.00 

2.00 

50.00 

50.00 

125.00 

50.00 

14.03 

75.00 

18.00 

8.00 

2.50 

40.00 

127.50 

3 . 25 

3 . 35 

65.00 

8.50 



106 



Nov. 18. The Mucato Concert 

26. Hon. William H. Taft, Lecture 

Dec. 9. Eugene Farns worth, Lecture . 

22. -Lincoln Wirt, Lecture .... 

29. $1,000 American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4s, 1929 

31. Balance 



The Fund of $30,000 is invested as follows: 
50 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 
30 " Boston & Lowell Railroad Co. 
10 " Boston & Providence Railroad Co. 
10 " Boston & Albany Railroad Co. 
10 " Fitchburg Railroad Co. 
10 " Old Colony Railroad Co. 
10 " West End Street Railway Co. pfd. 
10 " New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 
10 " Boston & Maine Railroad Co. 
60 " American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
50 " Northern Idaho & Montana Power Co., pfd. 
$3,000 Utah Co., 6s, 1917. 
$4,000 New York Railways Co., 5s, 1942. 
$1,000 New York Railways Co., 4s, 1942. 
$3,000 Southern Railway Co., 4s, 1956. 
$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co., 4s, 1929. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



109.81 


309.46 


50.00 


25.00 


929.78 


453.06 


$2,787.09 



107 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH FOR THE 
YEAR ENDING FEBRUARY i, 1916 

December 23, 1915. 

To the Hon. Board of Health: — 

I herewith submit following report of contagious 
diseases during the year 1915. 

Measles 29 cases 

Scarlet fever 7 cases 

MARTIN M. WELCH, 

Member of the Board of Health. 



108 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



The Board of Assessors submit the following report : — 

Number of residents assessed on property, 238 

non-residents assessed on property, 82 

" assessed on polls only, 162 

" acres of land assessed, 8,740 

" dwelling houses assessed, 273^ 

" horses assessed, 329 

" cows assessed, 542 

neat cattle other than cows assessed, 122 

" swine assessed, 645 

" sheep assessed, 172 

Value of land, exclusive of buildings, $579,740 00 

" buildings, exclusive of land, 1,072,305 00 

" " real estate, 

" " personal estate, 

Total valuation, 
State tax, 
County tax, 
State highway tax, 
Town grants, 

Total, $57,714 52 



$1,652,045 00 


2,933,590 00 


$4,585,635 00 


$9,360 00 


4,866 48 


358 04 


43,130 00 



109 



Number of polls, 


334 


Deduct part of corporation tax, 


$2,018 90 


Rate $12.00 per $1,000.00, 




Amount to be collected, 


$55,695 62 


December assessment, 


7,054 50 


Total to be collected, 


$62,750 12 



CHARLES S. WHEELER, 
WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 
WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, 

Assessors. 



110 





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126 



WATER COMMISSIONER'S REPORT 

The Board of Water Commissioners of the Town of 
Lincoln respectfully submit the following Report : — 

During the past year there have been pumped 
73,826,500 gallons of water, an average of 231,100 gallons 
per day. The minimum and maximum average daily 
amounts were respectively 162,200 and 350,100 gallons. 

Mr. James T. Laird has continued as Engineer and 
Superintendent of the Works. His pay was increased 
to the extent of $2.00 per week, beginning with the week 
ending May 1, 1915, the total amount now, after twenty- 
seven and one-half years service with the Water Works, 
being $22.00 per week and his water rates. 

Mr. Laird was also reappointed Collector for the Water 
Works. The pay for this service and responsibility 
being fixed at $175.00 for the year. The time taken on 
the collection work is outside of the time for which he 
is otherwise paid. 

Prior to the resignation of Mr. Chapin the Board of 
Water Commissioners voted to install an electrically 
operated pump which might be used either alone or in 
conjunction with the steam pump. The town is de- 
pendent at the present wholly on one steam pump and 
that means coal, which has been constantly getting more 
expensive, and further, a licensed engineer to operate 
it, possibly later a fireman. One boiler is now about 
17 years old and the other about 15 years old. 

The meter at the Reservoir is not in working order 
at the present time owing to its having been damaged 
by frost during the winter of 1915. The value to the 
town of a meter at this place is at least very doubtful. 



127 



The Winslow Recording Device for recording the 
elevation of the water in the Reservoir, as originally 
connected up was often in trouble on account of trees. 
During the past year a contract was made with the 
Telephone Company for the use of a pair of wires in their 
cable, from a point opposite the entrance to the Reservoir 
to the end of their cable on the Sandy Pond Road. The 
balance of the line, about 1,000 feet, was put in new and 
was put underground. 

The various dead ends on the main pipe must sooner 
or later be connected and this will gradually be done. 

The time has now arrived when the Water Com- 
missioners feel justified in making a reduction in the 
fixture rates and this reduction will undoubtedly be 
made on July 1, 1916, effective from that date. Such 
a reduction would have been made on July 1, 1915, 
except that the Water Commissioners felt it to be econ- 
omy, safety for the Town and good judgment to make 
provision for the payment of installing a new pump out 
of the surplus earnings and to postpone definitely re- 
ducing the rates until next year. 

Under date of October 23, 1915, Mr. George L. Chapin 
resigned from the Board, much to the regret of the re- 
maining members. Mr. Chapin has, during his thirty- 
five years of intimate connection with the Water Works, 
actively taken part in not only saving to the town a 
Water Works System, but in building it to its present 
proportions and has very truly assisted in carrying out 
the original proposition of the Water Act which author- 
ized the establishment of a Water Works System in 
the Town of Lincoln, for the purpose of supplying the 
inhabitants of the town with water. At the present 
time water mains are so laid that all of the inhabitants 
of the town can be supplied, except those living on one 
road. The plant is fully meeting its expenses, including 
the retirement of bonds, and can now, if its present 



128 



policy be continued, reduce the water rates. This has 
been accomplished notwithstanding considerable op- 
position on the part of some. We feel that the town has 
been particularly fortunate in having had the services 
of Mr. Chapin for so long a time. 

In accordance with the requirements of the law a joint 
meeting of the Board of Selectmen and the remaining 
members of the Board of Water Commissioners was 
held on November 13, 1915, at which meeting Mr. John 
Adams was elected to fill the vacancy caused by the 
resignation of Mr. Chapin. 

Inadvertently one bill of $175 does not appear in this 
year's account, with this exception all the bills con- 
tracted during the past year have been paid. 

The Board is always glad to receive advice and sug- 
gestions tending toward the improvement of the service. 

JOSEPH S. HART, 
WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, 
JOHN ADAMS, 

Board of Water Commissioners. 



129 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS FOR YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1915. 



Lincoln Water Works, Lincoln, Middlesex County, Mass. 

General Statistics 

Population by census of 1910, 1,175. 
Date of construction, 1874. 
By whom owned, Town. 
Source of supply, Sandy Pond. 
Mode of supply, Pumping. 

Pumping Statistics 

Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon, Cross compound Fly Wheel 
Pump, 12" and 20J" x 5f " x 12". 
Description of fuel used. 
Kind, hard and soft coal. 
Brand of coal, Lackawanna, Pocahontas. 
Average price of hard coal, per gross ton, delivered, $7.55. 
Average price of soft coal, per gross ton, delivered, $4.80. 
Percentage of ash. 
Wood, price per cord, $3.50. 
Coal consumed pumping, 330,135 lbs. 
Pounds of wood consumed, equivalent amount of coal, 

1,209 lbs. 
Total equivalent coal consumed for 12 months, 379,909 
lbs. 



130 



Total water pumped for the year, 73,826,500 gallons. 
Average static head against which pumps work 148.5 ft. 
Average dynamic head against which pump works 160 ft. 
Number of gallons pumped per pound of equivalent coal, 

194+. 
Cost of Pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, 

$3,050.00. 
Per million gallons pumped, $41.31+. 
Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic), 25.81+ 

cents. 

Statistics of Consumption of Water. 

Estimated total population at date, 1,175. 

Estimated population on lines of pipe, 1,145. 

Estimated population supplied, 1,145. 

Total water pumped for the year, 73,826,500 gallons. 

Average daily consumption, 202,264 gallons. 



RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR 



Domestic, i 
Hydrants, 
Public Buildings, 
Highway Department, 
Cemetery Commissioner, 


510,208 33 

1,830 00 

75 50 

22 00 

20 00 


Total Domestic Rate, 

Meters 

Boston & Maine R. R. Company, 
Water Troughs, 
Centre School, 
Other Meter Rates, 


$12,155 83 

992 00 
524 04 
00 00 
852 23 



Total Meter Rates, $2,368 27 



131 




PAYMENTS 




Expense, 


$236 69 


Fuel, 


1,417 07 


Salaries, 


1,767 13 


Interest, 


3,015 00 


Repairs and Renewals: — 




Account Reservoir, 


$329 30 


Service Pipes, 


208 68 


Pipe System, 


228 93 


Pump Station, 


335 56 


Construction : — 




Ex. of Pipes, 


$34 66 


Account Service Pipes, 


178 53 


Sundry, 


297 63 


Bonds, 


1,000 00 


Sinking Fund, 


1,500 00 


Total, 


$10,549 18 


Uncollected, 


1,213 96 



132 



Statistics Relating to Distribution System. 



. Mains. 

1. Kind of pipe, cast 
iron, cement lined and 
wood stave. 

2. Sizes, from 4" to 12". 

3. Extended feet dur- 
ing year. 

4. Discontinued feet 
during year. 

5. Total now in use, 
26.411 miles. 

6. Cost of repairs, per 
mile. 

7. Number of leaks per 
mile .0075. 

8. Length of pipes less 
than 4 inches diam., 
900 feet. 

9. Number of hydrants 
added during year, 0. 

10. Number of hydrants 
(public and private) 
now in use, 122. 

11. Number of stop gates 
added during year, 0. 

12. Number of stop gates 
now in use, 133. 

13. Number of stop gates 
smaller than 4 inch, 
4. 

14. Number of blow-offs, 
30. 

15. Range of pressure on 
mains 40 lbs. to 102 
lbs. 



16. 



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19. 
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26. 



Services 
Kind of pipe, galv. 
iron and cement 
lined. 

Sizes, |" to 4". 
Extended 154 feet. 
Discontinued 00 feet. 
Total now in use, 
miles. 

Number of service 
taps added during 
year, 11. 

Number now in use, 
326. 

Average length of 
service, 12+ feet. 
Average cost of ser- 
vice for the year, 
$15.00. 

Number of meters 
added, 1. 

Number now in use, 
44. 



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134 



WATER 



Payments 

James T. Laird, Services as Superintendent 

and Engineer, 
James T. Laird, Services of Auto Truck, 
James T. Laird, Cash paid for Postage, 
Herbert Nash, Jr., Examining and Reporting 

on Electric Pump, 
A. J. Dougherty, Reading Meters, 
National Express Co., Express, 
John F. Farrar & Son, Labor of Men, 
Joseph Mahan, Labor, 
W. H. Ryan, Labor, 
F. H. Cunningham, Labor, 
F. H. Cunningham, Services, 
Edison Electric Light Co., Light, 
William Johnson, Professional Services, 
R. B. Laird, Making out Water Bills, 
Allan Bros., Repairs on Stamp, 
Boston & Maine R. R., Freight, 
First National Bank, Coupons due March 1, 

1915, 
First National Bank, Coupons, due May 1, 
First National Bank, Coupons due June 1, 
First National Bank, 2 Bonds, due Sept. 1, 
First National Bank, Coupons, due Sept. 1, 
First National Bank, Coupons due Nov. 1, 
First National Bank, Coupons due Dec. 1, 
R. B. Laird, Copying Records, 



$1,110 00 


98 


10 


19 


65 


25 


00 


104 50 


4 68 


175 


61 


4 50 


13 38 


150 


50 


185 


10 


10 


15 


101 


00 


33 


00 


1 


00 


20 


36 


837 


50 


87 


50 


582 


50 


1,000 00 


837 50 


87 


50 


582 


50 


22 


00 



135 



Waltham Coal Co., Coal, $1,104 72 
M. L. Snelling, Teaming Coal, 162 11 
Martin Sherman, Labor, 72 25 
Daniel McAskill, Labor, 1 00 
J. A. Burgess, Labor and Supplies, 2 00 
Isaac N. MacRae, Labor and Supplies, 74 67 
Fritz Cunnert, Labor, 2 50 
W. C. Robus, Labor, 14 63 
W. H. Sherman, Labor of men, 22 50 
Robert D. Donaldson, Labor and Supplies, 127 03 
Hodge Boiler Works, Labor and Supplies, 47 76 
New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Telephone Service, 11 41 
George E. Crosby, Printing, 29 00 
Wendell Crowell, Hauling Pipe, 1 00 
William C. Pierce, Rent of Land, 1915, 5 00 
Charles S. Smith, Coal, 98 25 
Whitman & Howard, Surveying, 288 63 
Doherty Garage, Auto Hire, 4 25 
Waltham Publishing Co., Printing, 2 25 
Sinking Fund Commissioners, Sinking Fund, 1,500 00 
George L. Chapin, Services as Water Com- 
missioner, 50 00 
Joseph S. Hart, M. D., Services as Water Com- 
missioner, 75 00 
W. H. Sherman, Services as Water Com- 
missioner, 75 00 
Cemetery Commissioners, 10 Cords Wood, 35 00 
Damon & Glenn, Supplies, 13 69 
Chapman Valve Co., Supplies, 40 52 
Locke Regulator Co., Supplies, 3 31 
Chadwick Boston Lead Co., Supplies, 39 56 
National Meter Co., Supplies, 25 21 
Eagle Oil and Supply Co., Supplies, 131 38 
Walworth Mfg. Co., Supplies, 142 98 
Union Water Meter Co., Supplies 27 13 
Davis & Farnum Mfg. Co., Supplies, 14 54 



136 



Lynchburg Foundry Co., Supplies, $17 10 

Garlock Packing Co., Supplies, 12 48 

International Steam Pump Co., Supplies 8 95 

Western Electric Co., Supplies, 18 90 

Total, $10,395 24 



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138 



WATER WORKS DEPARTMENT 

OUTSTANDING BONDS 

Issue of 1897, due 1917, $10,000 00 

Issue of 1900, due 1930, 23,000 00 

Issue of 1902, due 1932, 9,000 00 

Issue of 1903, due 1933, 5,000 00 

Issue of 1904, due 1934, 5,000 00 

Issue of 1906, due 1936, 14,000 00 

Issue of 1907, due 1937, 4,000 00 

Issue of 1907, due one each year, 6,000 00 

Issue of 1911, due one each year, 4,000 00 



$80,000 00 



WATER RECEIPTS 

Domestic, $10,208 33 

Meter, 2,568 27 

Uncollected 1,213 96 



$13,990 56 



139 



REPORT OF CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

In addition to the regular routine of cemetery work 
which cannot be omitted, permanent improvements have 
been made such as the removal of objectionable trees in 
the vicinity of occupied lots and a general cleaning up of 
the bits of woodland adjacent to the open grounds. 
Considering the prevalence of forest fires in the dry 
season the former condition was decidedly unsafe as 
well as unsightly; the cutting and burning of the under- 
brush of course destroyed many ideal nesting places for 
the various destructive moths. Still more of this work 
should be a feature of future operations. 

Also several pieces of grading and seeding were 
accomplished with good results, adding much to the 
general appearance of the cemetery. 

Although Spring seeding as a rule is hardly to be 
depended upon in this case the unusual rainfall of the 
season made the venture a success. 

The avenues leading to various parts of the grounds 
would be much improved by a coating of stone and 
gravel as the original field loam is at present the only 
foundation. This would apply to utility as well as the 
improved appearance. 

A beginning has already been made with the idea of 
doing still more the coming year. 

That much is needed to be done in many ways, such 
as the planting of ornamental trees and shrubs, the ex- 
tension of water pipes, &c. &c. is self-evident from the 
viewpoint of utility and aesthetic beauty, but with the 
limited amount which it seems advisable to appropriate 



140 



for Cemetery work a gradual change for the better from 
year to year seems the only ultimatum. 

An amount equivalent 'to that of last year is respect- 
fully requested, $500.00. 

Attention is again called to the matter of deeds from 
the town to lot holders. Such may be had at any time 
by applying to the Cemetery Commission. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JULIUS E. EVELETH, 
ROGER SHERMAN, 
CHARLES S. SMITH, 

Cemetery Commissioners. 



141 



THE TOWN TREASURER IN ACCOUNT WITH 
THE LINCOLN CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

By Cash of R. Sherman for sale of £ lot $10 00 

11 " " Water Works for Wood 35 00 

" Unoin Pacific R. R. Co., two dividends .... 12 00 

" Fitchburg R. R. Co., four dividends 10 00 

" American Sugar Refining Co., four dividends ... 28 00 

Total $95 00 

Deposited in Middlesex Institution for Savings .... 95 00 



The following is a list of Securities of the Lincoln Cemetery Com- 
missioners : — 

Four Shares American Sugar Refining Co., preferred stock. 
Three Shares Union Pacific R. R. Co., preferred stock. 
Two Shares Fitchburg R. R. Co., preferred stock. 

Also the following funds for the care of lots in cemetery, all of which are 
deposited in the Middlesex Institution for Savings: — 
Orilla J. Flint Fund, $300.00, interest accrued .... $51 44 
Samuel Hartwell Fund, $300.00, interest accrued ... 51 44 

John H. Pierce Fund, $500.00, interest accrued ... 80 02 

Maria L. Thompson Fund, $500.00, interest accrued . 85 58 

Annie A. Ray Fund, $300.00, interest accrued .... 51 44 

Also 
General Fund deposited in Middlesex Institution for Savings 

amounting to 634 31 

(Signed) CHARLES S. WHEELER, 

Town Treasurer. 
E. &0. E. 



142 



TREE WARDEN'S REPORT. 

The Tree Warden submits to the Town his report for 
the year 1915. 

The work of this department has been carried on as 
in previous years removing deadwood from our trees, 
and removing dead trees from near the roadsides that 
threatened to become a source of danger. Lincoln has 
a great many trees per mile of roadway, and the majority 
of them must be climbed each year to remove a dead 
limb or two, or may be the weight of foliage has lowered 
limbs so that they form an obstruction in the highway 
which must be looked after. The work of suppressing 
the gipsy and brown tail moths has been most successful 
during the past year. The street trees alone show a 
decided improvement over any previous years. There 
is also a great improvement on private property where 
the work has been done from year to year. The methods 
of doing the work remain practically the same. We go all 
over the roadside trees creosoting the nests during the 
winter and spring months, finding plenty to do along 
this line until about the middle of May, when the spray- 
ing operations are started. The roadside trees on all the 
roads in Town were given a thorough spraying with 
arsenate of lead going over a great many of them a second 
time. While spraying is one of the great factors we have 
for the suppression of the gipsy moth and other insects, 
it cannot be depended on wholly where the infestation 
is bad, because the caterpillars are so numerous they will 
eat the buds before they have a chance to start. It is 
especially so with oak trees of which we have a large 



143 



number. After the spraying season was over this year 
we found it necessary to the moth work and to public 
safety to cut the brush and clean up the roadsides on the 
following roads : Silver Hill Road to Weston line, Brown- 
ing Road or Conant Road to Weston line, South Great 
Road from Weston line to the railroad crossing, Tower 
Road to Weston line, Pierce's Hill Road, Nine Acre 
Corner Road to Concord line, Concord and Wayland 
Road from H. A. Higginson's to Abner Wheeler's corner, 
Trapelo Road to Waltham line and Bedford Road to 
Bedford line. 

The total expenditure of this department this year 
was $4,035.81. Of this amount there was $1,530.03 for 
private work, leaving a net cost of $2,505.78 to the 
Town. 

I recommend that $2,500.00 be appropriated this year 
$2,000.00 for moth work and $500.00 for tree work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Tree Warden. 



144 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

The Trustees submit herewith the reports of the 
Treasurer and Librarian of the Lincoln Public Library 
for the year ending February 1, 1916. They ask for an 
appropriation of $500 and the dog tax. 

The Trustees record with deep regret the loss by 
death of one of their most valued members, Mr. Charles 
Francis Adams. Mr. Adams was chairman of the 
board at the time of his death. He was elected to the 
board by the acting Trustees in 1901 taking the place of 
Dr. George G. Tarbell, and served continuously until 
his death. Notwithstanding the many activities of 
Mr. Adams, he always took a keen interest in the affairs 
of the Library and gave freely in time and wise counsel 
to the matters that came before the Trustees. During 
his trusteeship he gave special attention to the particular 
needs of the townspeople as a whole by endeavoring to 
place upon the shelves of the Library those books best 
adapted to their wants. The loss of his able services 
will be most deeply felt. Mr. George G. Tarbell, nephew 
of the late Dr. Tarbell, was elected to take the place of 
Mr. Adams. 

C. L. TODD, 
Chairman of Trustees. 



145 



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146 



STATISTICAL REPORT OF THE LINCOLN 

PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

FEBRUARY i, 1916. 

Number of volumes in Library, Feb. 1, 1915, 10,092 

Increase by purchase, 122 

Increase by gift, 1 

Increase by binding periodicals, 13 

Total increase, 136 

Number of volumes rebound, 13 
Number of volumes withdrawn replaced by 

new editions, 10 
Number of volumes in Library, Feb. 1, 1916, 10,228 

Total delivery of books for year, 7,600 

Largest delivery in one day, 127 

Smallest delivery in one day, 35 

Number of days Library was open, 1 03 

Gifts of books, pamphlets, etc., have been received 
from the following persons: — Arthur A. Carey, Arthur 
F. Chapin, Mrs. Robert De Normandie, Mrs. N. L. 
Husted, Mr. Oliver W. Norton, Miss Jennie I. Pierce, 
Miss Bertha Scripture, Mrs. Roger- Sherman, Mrs. James 
J. Storrow, Mrs. A. C. Wheelwright, Mr. F. W. Whitney. 

Gifts from Libraries, Institutions, etc., as follows: — 
Boston Public Library, Boston Museum of Fine Arts, 
Mass. Free Public Library Commission, Carnegie Hero 
Fund Commission, Interstate Commerce Commission, 
Mass. Agricultural Experiment Station, Mass. Total 
Abstinence Society, Soldiers' Home, Woman's Edu- 
cation Association, Library of Congress, Groton Public 
Library, Hartford Public Library, Brookline Public 
Library, Springfield Public Library, Worcester Public 
Library, Waltham Public Library, Concord Public 
Library, Weston Public Library, Friend's Free Public 
Library, Germantown, Concord Christian Science Liter- 
ature Committee. 



147 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ACCESSIONS TO THE LIBRARY FOR 1915 
FICTION 

Bennett, Arnold. A great man 767 22 

Birmingham, G. A. Minnie's Bishop and other stories 768.5 

Cather, Willa Sibert. Song of the lark 768.3 

Churchill, Winston. A far country 767.16 

Colcord, Lincoln. Game of life and death : Stories of the sea . 767.12 

Comfort, Will Levington. Red fleece 767.8 

Conrad, Joseph. Victory: an Island tale 707.15 

Davis, Richard Harding. Somewhere in France 768.4 

D eland, Margaret. Around Old Chester 768.7 

Dostoeosky, Fyodor. Crime and punishment. From the Russian 

by Constance Garnet 767.19 

Ervine, John G. Alice and a family 767.17 

Galsworthy, John. The Freelands 767.26 

Goldfish, Being the confessions of a successful man . 768.15 

Grant, Robert. The High Priestess 768.1 

Gray, Phoebe. Little Sir Galahad 767.7 

Harrison, Henry Sydnor. Angela's business .... 767.14 
Ho wells, William Dean. Seen and unseen at Stratford-on- 

Avon: a fantasy 768.14 

Lagerlbf, Selma. Jerusalem. Translated by Velma S. Howard 768. 10 

Lee, Jennette. Aunt Jane 768.11 

Lincoln, Joseph C. Thankful's inheritance .... 768.8 

London, Jack. The scarlet Plague 767.20 

McCutcheon, George Barr. Mr. Bingle 768.13 

Maniates, Belle K. Amarilly of Clothes Line Alley 767.6 

Montgomery, L. M. Anne of the Island . . , . . 768.6 

Parker, Gilbert. The money master 768.12 

Phillpotts, Eden. Brunei's tower 767.11 

Poole, Ernest. The harbor 767.13 

Porter, Eleanor H. Pollyanna grows up 767.1 

Rinehart, Mary Roberts. K 767.23 

Street of the Seven Stars 767 . 5 

Sedgwick, Anne Douglas. The encounter .... 767.10 

Service, Robert W. The pretender 767.2 

Singmaster, Elsie. Katy Gaumer 767 . 3 

Smith, F. Hopkinson. Felix O' Day 768.9 

Tarkington, Booth. The turmoil 767.24 

Walpole, Hugh. Fortitude : Being a true and faithful account 

of the education of an adventurer 767.21 



148 



Ward, Mrs. Humphrey. Eltham house 768 . 2 

Warner, Anne. How Leslie loved 767.18 

Wells, H. G. Bealby 767.9 

White, Eliza Orne. The first step 765.20 

Willsie, Honore. StillJim 767.4 

BIOGRAPHY. HISTORY 

Chapman, John Jay. Memories and milestones . 547 . 15 

Dunning, William Archibald. British Empire and the U. S. . 365 . 1 
Field, Annie P. L. Story of Canada Blackie. With an 
introduction by Thomas Mott Osborne, warden of 

Sing Sing 644.21 

Hazen, Charles Downer. Europe since 1815 .... 321.11 

Rolland, Romain. Musicians of to-day 547 . 14 

Root, Jean Christie. Nathan Hale 636.13 

Seipel, Paul. Hugenot saint of the twentieth century. Life 

ofAdeleKamm 644.18 

Shaw, Anna Howard. Story of a pioneer 644 . 23 

Steele, S. B., Col. Forty years in Canada . 644.19 

Thayer, William Roscoe. Life and letters of John Hay. 2 vols. 644 . 22 



TRAVEL AND DESCRIPTION. 

Cooper, Elizabeth. My Lady of the Chinese Courtyard 
Finley, John. The French in the heart of America 

Ross, Edward. South of Panama 

Stevenson, Mrs. Robert Louis. Cruise of the "Janet Nichol' 

among the South Sea Islands 

White, Stewart Edward. The rediscovered country 



443.25 
425.26 
424.25 

426.22 
425.25 



POETRY. DRAMA 

Dickinson, Emily. The single hound: Poems of a lifetime . 1435.17 

Frost, Robert. North of Boston 1436.17 

Noyes, Alfred. Rada: a drama of war 1414.24 

Palmer, Alice Freeman. The marriage cycle: With a preface 

by George Herbert Palmer 1435.16 

Upward, Allen. Paradise found : or the superman found out . 1414 . 23 



SCIENCE. USEFUL ARTS. 

Condit, Elizabeth and Long, Jessie A. How to cook and why 
Finck, Henry T. Success in music; and how it is won 
Quinn, Mary J. Planning and furnishing a home . 
Walton, George Lincoln. The flower finder 
Waugh, Frank A. Rural improvement .... 



146.32 
146.30 
146.31 
147.27 
137.28 



149 



RELIGION. PHILOSOPHY. 



Upward, Allen. The Divine mystery. Reading of the his- 
tory of Christianity down to the time of Christ . . 1114.18 
Wilson, Woodrow. When a man comes to himself . . . 1114.20 
Whither 1114.19 



PERIODICALS. 

Atlantic monthly. 1913, 1914. Vols. Ill, 112, 113, 114. 
Century illustrated monthly magazine. 1912, 1913, 1914. 

Vols. 85, 86, 87, 88. 
Harper's monthly magazine. 1912, 1913. Vols. 126, 127, 

128, 129. 
St. Nicholas magazine. 1913. Vol. 40 2 . 

GENERAL LITERATURE 

Barcynska, Countess, Editor. The little mother who sits at 

home 1537.23 

Benson, Arthur Christopher. Escape and other essays . 1316.20 

Blackford, Katherine M. and Newcomb, Arthur. The job, 

the man, the Boss 1536.25 

Converse, Florence. Story of Wellesley 1316.18 

Crawford, Mary Caroline. Social life in Old New England . 1337.24 

Hewlett, Maurice. Lore of Proserpine 1536.22 

Kennedy, Sinclair. The Pan-angles; a consideration of the 

federation of the seven English speaking nations . . 1312.6 

Norton, Oliver Willcox. Attack and defense of Little Round 

Top, Gettysburg, July 2, 1863 1537.22 

Osborne, Thomas Mott. Within Prison walls: Being a 
narrative of personal experiences during a week of 
voluntary confinement in the State Prison of Auburn, 

N. Y 1522.13 

Phelps, William Lyon. Essays on books 1312 . 3 

Ryan, Kate. Old Boston Museum days 1316.19 

Tagore, Rabindranath. Gitanjali. (Song offerings.) A col- 
lection of prose translations made by the author from 

the original Bengali 1536.23 

Walton, George L. Peg along 1337.26 

JUVENILE. 

Altsheler, Joseph A. Young trailers 1244.19 

Bennett, John. Barnaby Lee 1244.17 



150 

Blaisdell, Albert F. and Ball, Francis K. Heroic deeds of 

American soldiers 1243 . 27 

Blodgett, Mabel Fuller. Strange story of Mr. Dog and Mr. 

Bear' 1244.22 

Deming, Edwin Willard. Children of the wild. . . 831.28 
Dickinson, Asa Don, Editor. Children's book of Thanks- 
giving stories 1243 . 26 

Du Chaillu, Paul. Country of the dwarfs 1216.16 

Eastman, Charles A. (Ohiyesa.) Indian Scout talks. A 

guide for Boy Scouts and Camp Fire Girls . 1244.15 

Holland, Rupert Sargent. Boy Scouts of Snow Shoe Island . 1243. 19 

Hopkins, William J. The Sandman: His farm stories . 1244.14 

Jackson, Gabrielle E. Wee Willie Winkles .... 1244.9 

Jacobs, Caroline Emilia. A Texas Bluebonnet . . 1244.11 
Jacobs, C. E. and Read, Edyth Ellerbach. Bluebonnet's 

ranch party; sequel to a Texas Bluebonnet . . . 1244.12 
Jacobs, Caroline E. and Richards, Lela H. Bluebonnet in 

Boston 1244.13 

Linderman, Frank B. Indian why stories : Sparks from War 

Eagle's lodge fire 1243.21 

Marks, Jennette. Early English hero tales .... 1244.16 

Pyle, Howard. Pepper and salt : a seasoning for young people 1244 . 10 

Jack Ballister's fortunes 1244.18 

Rhys, Ernest. Fairy gold : a book of old English fairy tales . 1244 . 20 

Roberts, Charles G. D. Hoof and claw 1243.23 

Rolt- Wheeler, Francis. Boy with the U. S. Explorers . 1243.24 
Smith, E. Boyd. The farm book. Bob and Betty visit 

Uncle John 1241.30 

Tagore, Rabindranath. The crescent moon: Child poems. 

Translated from the original B engali by the author . . 1 244 . 1 7 
Tomlinson, Everett T. Places young Americans ought to 

know 1243.25 

Wallas, Ada, Translator. Clean Peter and the children of 

Grubbylea 1241.29 

Widener, Margaret. Winona of the camp fire . . 1243.20 

BOOKS RELATING TO THE EUROPEAN WAR AND ALLIED 

SUBJECTS. 

Cramb, J. A. Origins and destiny of Imperial Britain: And 

nineteenth century Europe 1536.24 

Eliot, Charles W. Road toward peace : a contribution to the 
study of the causes of the European war and the 
means of preventing war in the future . . . 1312.7 

Graham, Stephen. Russia and the world: a study of the war 
and a statement of the world-problems that now con- 
front Russia and Great Britain 447 . 10 



151 



Gray, Alexander, Translator. I accuse! (J'accuse.) By a 

German 1337.25 

Lodge, Henry Cabot. One hundred years of peace . . . 1312. 2 
Sarolea, Charles. Anglo-German problem .... 1522 . 14 

How Belgium saved Europe 1312.5 

Usher, Roland G. Pan-Americanism: A forecast of the 
inevitable clash between the United States and Europe's 

victor 1312.1 

Wister, Owen. Pentecost of calamity 1534.27 

Wood, Eric Fisher. Note-book of an attache : seven months 

in the war zone 644 . 20 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE 



SCHOOL YEAR 1915 




154 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

HENRY E. WARNER, Chairman, Term expires 1917 
ANTHONY J. DOHERTY, Secretary, Term expiresl916 
MRS. ELIZABETH W. BLODGETT, 

Term expires 1918 

Superintendent of Schools 

C. S. LYMAN 

Supervisor of Drawing and Manual Training 

WALTER F. BRACKETT 

Supervisor of Sewing 

MRS. ABBIE P. SMITH 

Supervisor of Cooking 
BERTHA A. WILSON 
Teachers 
Lincoln Grammar Grades VII — VIII 
MARION H. C. CRAWFORD 
Lincoln Grammar Grades V — VI 
KATHARINE E. WORKS 
Lincoln Primary Grade I V 
PRISCILLA C. AMES 
Lincoln Primary Grade III 
HELEN M. BOWKER 
Lincoln Primary Grades I — II 
HATTIE B. HEATH 
South Primary Grades I — II 
HELEN P. JONES 
Truant Officer 
JAMES T. LAIRD 
Janitors 
Lincoln 
EDWARD BANNON 
South 
FRANCIS BENNETT 



155 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

As foreshadowed in our last report the increased at- 
tendance at the Lincoln School made it necessary to 
establish another classroom. The large middle room on 
the second story was therefore equipped with the neces- 
sary furniture and Miss Ames, formerly the special 
teacher, was put in charge of this classroom. It was 
deemed advisable to experiment with this situation for 
a time without employing a special teacher. The ad- 
dition of this classroom and re-distribution of pupils 
helped to equalize the situation as to classrooms to a 
certain extent, but not entirely. As the pupils do not 
naturally fall into an equal division among the various 
grades, we constantly find that some one or more grades 
are proportionately too large and this results in putting 
more pupils in some rooms than in others. In other 
words, it is not practicable to have an entirely equal 
distribution throughout the classrooms because of the 
varying numbers in the grades from time to time. Of 
course the larger the number in a classroom, or in a grade, 
the less individual attention can be given to any one pupil 
and the more we approach the situation where the 
assistance of the special teacher is necessary. 

Owing to the danger from Scarlet Fever it was neces- 
sary to close the schools for some two weeks near the 
end of the year, thus not only losing valuable time but 
seriously interfering with the general plan of work and 
the momentum of the schools. In order to make up 
for lost time a re-arrangement of the Christmas vacation 
was necessary, but that did not wholly make good the 



156 

loss of time or upsetting effect of the interruption, and 
it is probable that the employment of a special teacher, 
as a temporary matter at least, is again advisable. 

There has been one change in the teachers in the 
Lincoln School since last year, Miss Wilson of Concord 
having very successfully taken up the cooking class 
formerly held by Mrs. Smith, who now confines her 
instructions to the sewing class. 

In the South Primary School there has been no change 
of teachers. 

The question of transportation by barges to and from 
the schools has been the cause of much vexation as usual. 
The total number attending the Lincoln School is 157. 
The total number attending the South Primary is 36. 
The seating capacity of the South barge is 25, of the 
East barge 18, of the North barge 18. It is obvious 
that these three barges even when crowded as far as 
practicable fall far short of transporting all the children. 
Some assistance has come from the use of Mr. Doherty's 
automobiles in the South, but there is still a lack of 
transportation for a great many pupils. This is the 
same situation which has prevailed for many years, 
fluctuating from time to time. The Committee have 
done the best they could from time to time to get the 
most out of the various conveyances, but at best many 
pupils could not be transported in this way. The 
expense of transportation is very heavy and would be 
very greatly increased if additional barges were put on. 
Wholly aside from this additional expense there is the 
practical difficulty of finding satisfactory persons to 
take charge of more barges and a very practical difficulty 
in arranging routes economically and advantageously. 

The subject is a most troublesome one, and in a town 
covering so large an area as Lincoln, and with so many 
pupils coming from separate and more or less isolated 
homes, it is probably wholly impracticable to attempt 



157 

to transport all of them. It may well be that the best 
solution will be to utilize the existing conveyances, as 
far as they will go, to carry the children who live at the 
greatest distance, or who by reason of age or delicate 
condition are most in need of transportation, and to 
make no attempt to transport the others, and the Com- 
mittee has under consideration the adoption of such a 
plan. We do not say that this plan is satisfactory or that 
it is not open to criticism. We only suggest that it is 
perhaps the most practical way to deal with a practical 
matter. 

The report of the Superintendent and the usual 
statistics are submitted herewith. 

HENRY E. WARNER, 
ELIZABETH W. BLODGETT, 
ANTHONY J. DOHERTY. 

Committee. 



158 



SUMMARY OF SCHOOL EXPENSES 



Salaries of Superintendent and Teachers 


$4,942.00 


High School Tuition, 


4,251.45 


High School Transportation, 


869.19 


Transportation of Children (Local), 


2,597.00 


Janitor Service, 


623.70 


School Physician, 


200.00 


Fuel, 


382.75 


Barges, Repairs, etc., 


120.15 


Repairs on School Buildings, 


270.29 


Water Service, 


111.75 


Supplies, 


515.39 


Miscellaneous, 


136.26 


Total, 


$15,019.93 



159 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

To the School Committee of the Town of Lincoln : — 

My ninth annual report will be brief, as the work has 
continued along the same lines as in recent years. As 
usual we have tried to keep all the work up and strengthen 
some few lines. We strive to make our school system 
better each year, and while progress may be slow it 
should be sure and lasting. Our teachers are faithful 
and earnest, the spirit and discipline good, therefore the 
school work is running smoothly. The great majority 
of the pupils are quick to respond and show much interest 
in the work. Occasionally children come in from out- 
side, especially those sent by the state or city of Boston, 
whom we are obliged to discipline, but this is only one 
of the necessary incidents of school life. We impress 
it upon the children that they must all learn to live in 
harmony and form such social habits that they will 
naturally take their place as good members of the com- 
munity. 

We have no patience with those who believe in a soft 
and easy education. From the very beginning our 
children are taught to be industrious, to work hard and 
so be able to overcome difficulties. While we try our 
best to make the work interesting and school life pleasant 
and succeed so well that most of our children enjoy school, 
yet we impress upon each pupil that there are tasks, 
often disagreeable, difficult tasks, which must be done. 
By persistent effort, day by day the children are forming 
habits which will spell success later in life. There are 
some things, like the multiplication tables and certain 



160 

correct English forms, which must be learned by con- 
stant drill. Some other lessons must be reasoned out 
after deep thinking. This demands a high grade of 
teaching. As the pupils respond to this kind of instruc- 
tion they grow in will power as well as in knowledge. 

The New School Room 

In last year's report I told of the increase in the 
number of pupils and the crowding of some school rooms. 
To improve conditions the fifth room at the Lincoln 
school was finished and furnished last spring. The fourth 
grade, numbering 27 pupils, has been placed in this 
room, and the third grade transferred from the South 
school to the third grade room in the Lincoln school. 
This has relieved the congestion in all our school rooms, 
except that occupied by grades five and six. The 
teachers are working easier and with less nervous strain. 
The children in the primary grades are receiving more 
individual attention than last year. 

Those who have studied educational problems care- 
fully and who know most about the public schools believe 
that one of the greatest drawbacks to their success is the 
large number of pupils per teacher and too much mass 
teaching. Under these conditions many pupils do not 
receive the individual attention which they need to 
help them over hard places, to arouse their interest and 
ambition or to teach them to study efficiently. Such 
children are lost in the mass and do not develop as they 
should. We strive to keep Lincoln schools free from 
this error. 

The Teachers' Salaries and Work 

In times past other towns have called our teachers 
away by the offer of larger salaries. This has neces- 
sitated the securing and training of a new set of teachers, 



161 

which means the lowering of our efficiency, until the 
new teachers become acquainted with our pupils, our 
community and peculiar conditions. 

There are too many tramp teachers. There is too 
little stability in the teaching profession. Few strong 
teachers remain in one school long enough to become a 
power in the community. This fault can often be 
remedied by the payment of larger salaries. 

Our committee has taken the stand that our teachers 
are worth as much to Lincoln as to other towns and has 
raised salaries. As a result we did not lose a teacher the 
past year. On account of home conditions Mrs. Smith 
gave up her cooking classes, but retained her sewing 
classes. Miss Bertha A. Wilson was engaged to teach 
cooking and is doing well with this department. 

All the girls from the fifth grade up take sewing and 
besides learning the various stitches they run the sewing 
machine. By the end of their course they have cut and 
made a variety of underwear, aprons and dresses. In 
this way some of the girls do much towards clothing 
themselves. 

The three upper classes take cooking and have made 
bread, cake, puddings, pastry, cooked breakfast foods, 
fish and meats, and done some preserving. Theory is 
worked along with each lesson in classifying the foods. 
They learn the nutritive values of these various foods 
and how to prepare a well balanced meal. 

As the town of Stoneham wished Mr. Brackett to 
give its schools four days a week instead of three as 
formally, he dropped the drawing work in Lincoln last 
September, but still devotes one day to our manual 
training. In his report to me he says : — 

"The work in Manual Training has been on the same 
general lines as usual. The outgoing eighth grade boys 
were noticeable for their work, from the time they 
entered in the sixth grade. Their ability and ambition 



162 

were clearly shown in their last year. One boy made a 
portable hen coop, two others made morris chairs, 
costumers, stools both with cane and upholstered seats, 
and a large variety of useful articles. This year as a 
new subject I intend to give the eighth grade a short 
course in electricity and apply it in light wiring, bell 
wiring and making and installing an efficient wireless 
receiving set. It seems to me that the age and size of 
the boys have gradually lessened in the past few years, 
I miss the strong boys we had a few years ago. The 
larger project will offer greater resistance to the smaller 
boys." 

The principal, Miss Crawford, reports that, "The 
teachers have been making a special effort to improve 
the language work. More time has been devoted this 
year to the writing, and I think many of the children 
have made a marked improvement in both composition 
and penmanship. 

In each grade we are correlating the drawing with 
other subjects with good results. 

The girls are showing much interest in the cooking 
lessons this year." 

An excellent series of lessons in physiology and health 
habits is given each week, which we believe will result 
in more careful attention to hygienic surroundings and 
habits. The appearance of some pupils plainly in- 
dicates that their home conditions need to be greatly 
improved. Some children evidently are not sufficiently 
nourished. Until their home conditions are changed 
they will not make much progress in school. The 
parents should do all in their power to send the children 
to school in such a good physical condition that they 
can profit by the instruction. 

The epidemic of scarlet fever and grip caused much 
loss of time during the fall term. Not only were the 
schools closed for nearly two weeks, but many pupils 



163 

were absent, some of them for weeks. One month the 
percent of attendance in a primary room fell below sixty. 
This of course has retarded our work, but we must make 
the best of it, and accomplish as much as possible during 
the remainder of the school year. 

Conveyance of School Children 

The regulation of the business of conveying children 
to and from the public schools often causes the school 
officials considerable perplexity and at times arouses 
dissatisfaction among the parents and pupils. It is 
well for all to know where we stand on this important 
question. While the state law requires the town to 
furnish suitable school accommodations, it does not 
demand that we convey the pupils to school. 

The laws on this subject are as follows: — 

Chapter 42, Section 1, Revised Laws: " Every city 
and town SHALL maintain for at least thirty-two weeks 
in each year, a sufficient number of schools for the in- 
struction of all the children who may legally attend a 
public school therein, — (Subjects 

of study given here.)" 

Chapter 42, Section 22: "Towns SHALL raise by 
taxation money necessary for the support of public 
schools." 

Chapter 25, Section 15, Revised Laws, provides that a 
town MAY at legal meetings appropriate money "For 
conveying pupils to and from the public schools, or, if 
it maintains no high school or public school of corres- 
ponding grade but affords high school instruction by 
sending pupils to other towns, for the necessary trans- 
portation expenses of such pupils, the same to be ex- 
pended by the school committee in its discretion." 

The towns and cities in Massachusetts and many 
other states have wisely and cheerfully voted money to 



164 

convey pupils who live at a long distance from school, 
so it has finally become an established custom. But 
there are parents who think the towns are compelled 
to transport their children, and they often complain 
bitterly if the barge does not call at the door. This is 
unreasonable. State and town authorities who have 
studied this question believe that the transportation of 
children has already been carried too far, and that there 
is danger of people becoming too dependent. 

From my own experience as a child and from obser- 
vation of many children, I believe that a walk of a mile 
to school is good for most pupils, and that strong, healthy 
boys and girls greatly benefit by walking two miles. 
Vigorous exercise in the fresh air before and after 
school tends to develop strong, active bodies and minds 
which are in better condition to profit by school work 
than those which are pampered or aneamic. Walking 
is one of the best health stimulating exercises. 

If all concerned would be reasonable on this subject, 
the conveyance problem could be solved without friction. 

In closing I wish to express to the committee my 
hearty thanks for your support and encouragement, and 
to assure the teachers that I fully appreciate their 
earnest endeavors to improve the schools. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. S. LYMAN, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



165 



ROLL OF HONOR 

The following pupils have been neither absent nor 
tardy for the time designated : — 

For Five Years 
Emily Robus 

For Two Years 

Malcolm Donaldson 

Harold Rocks 

William Robus 

For One Year 

Edward W. Flint. Forrest Nelson. 

Pauline A. Chamberlain. Wilbert MacRea. 

Alice E. Robus. Rothwell MacRea. 

For Two Terms 

Andrew B. Weir Wilmot Smith. 

Robert D. Donaldson. Nancy McCormick 

Bertha L. Chapin. Myrtle Sherman. 

Marjorie J. Doherty. Mary Piantedose. 

Marion E. O'Hearn. Edward Rocks. 

Alden G. Farrar. Edith Rowe. 
Mary P. Lennon. 



166 



For One Term 



James F. Farrar. 
Edith L. Banforth. 
Marion Rocks. 
Joseph Eaton. 
Stanley Smith. 
Helen H. Pierce. 
Margaret MacRae. 
Chester Bates. 
Marie Connors. 
Lillian Rocks. 
Wilbur Doten. 
Richard Nelson. 
Eveleth Todd. 
Alice Ambrose. 



Grace Farquhar. 
Ethel MacRae. 
Bernice Cousins. 
Lester Pearson. 
Edgar Browning. 
George Flint. 
Emily Chamberlain. 
Alice Connors. 
Annie Sherman. 
David Farquhar. 
Dominick Piantedose. 
W. Everett Chutt. 
Jack Corrigan. 
Florence Sherman. 



167 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Winter Term begins January 3, 1916, ends March 24; 
twelve weeks. 

Spring Term begins April 3, ends June 16; eleven 
weeks. 

Fall Term begins September 5, ends December 15; 
fifteen weeks. 

Winter Term begins January 1, 1917, ends March 23; 
twelve weeks. 

Spring Term begins April 2, ends June 15; eleven 
weeks. 

Recess from Wednesday before Thanksgiving to 
Monday following. 

Holidays: Washington's Birthday, Patriot's Day, 
Memorial Day, Columbus Day. 

Length of school year, thirty-eight weeks. 



168 
STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1914-1915. 

Number of children in Town, September, 1915, 

between the ages of 5 and 16: boys, 131, girls, 

114; total .... ... 245 

Number of children in Town, September, 1915, 

between the ages of 7 and 14 : boys, 90 girls, 77 ; 

total .167 

Number of children in Town, September, 1915, 

between the ages of 5 and 7: boys, 22, girls, 16; 

total 38 

Number of children in Town, September, 1915, 

between the ages of 14 and 16 : boys, 19, girls, 21 ; 

total .40 

Enrollment for the year, ending June, 1915 . 193 

Enrollment between 5 and 16 years of age . .192 
Enrollment between 7 and 14 years of age . . . 157 
Number attending Concord High School . . .25 

Number attending Concord High Agricultural 

School 5 

Number attending Waltham High School . . 14 

Number of regular teachers employed ... 6 

Number of special teachers employed ... 3 

Number of teachers who have graduated from 

Normal School 2 

Number of teachers who have graduated from 

Training School 2 

Total number registered in Lincoln Schools during 

the year, ending June, 1915 201 

Number of pupils sent to High Schools from 

Lincoln 44 

Number of pupils receiving instruction at town 

expense 245 

Number completing Grammar School, June 1915: 

boys 7, girls, 4, total 11 

Number of pupils entering High Schools : boys, 6, 

girls, 4 10 



169 



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171 



WARRANT 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln, in 
said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify the legal voters of said 
Town of Lincoln, qualified to vote at Town Meeting for 
the transaction of Town affairs, to meet in the Town 
Hall, in said Lincoln, on Monday, the sixth day of 
March next, at 11.30 o'clock A. M. by posting a copy 
of this Warrant by you attested, in each of the Post 
Offices and in some other public place in said Town, 
seven days at least before the said sixth day of March, 
then and there to act upon the following Articles : 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot will be open 
at 12 o'clock noon and may be closed at 6.30 o'clock P. M. 

ARTICLE 1. To choose a Moderator. 

ART. 2. To bring in their votes for the following 
Town Officers, and any other officers required by law to 
be elected by ballot or otherwise, also any committees, 
commissioners and trustees. 

Three Selectmen for one year. 

One member of the Board of Assessors for three years. 



172 

One member of the Board of Health for three years. 

One Treasurer for one year. 

One Collector for one year. 

One Auditor for one year. 

Two Constables for one year. 

One Tree Warden for one year. 

One member of the Trust Fund Commissioners for 
three years. 

One member of Trustees for Free Public Lectures for 
three years. 

One member of the School Committee for three years. 

One member of the Board of Water Commissioners 
for three years. 

One member of the Board of Cemetery Commissioners 
for three years. 

Also to vote "Yes" or "No" upon the following ques- 
tion: 

"Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in this Town?" 

ART. 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committee, Commissioners and Trustees. 

ART. 4. To appropriate money for necessary and 
expedient purposes of the Town and enact anything in 
relation to the same. 

ART. 5. To determine the manner of collecting 
taxes for the ensuing year. 

ART. 6. To determine the compensation of the 
Collector of Taxes for the ensuing year. 

ART. 7. To see if the Town will authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
during the municipal year, beginning February 1, 1916, 



173 

in anticipation of the collection of taxes for the said 
year, such sums of money as may be necessary for the 
current expenses of the Town, but not exceeding the 
total tax levy for the said year, giving the notes of the 
Town in payment therefor payable in one year from the 
date thereof. All debts incurred under authority of this 
vote shall be paid from taxes of the present municipal 
year. 

ART. 8. To see if the Town will choose a Committee 
on Claims under the provisions of Section 3, Article 6 
of the By-Laws. 

ART. 9. To see if the Town will authorize and 
direct the Commissioners of Sinking and Trust Funds 
to deliver to the Town Treasurer all of the Schoolhouse 
Bonds which they have purchased, together with any 
accumulated cash, and direct the Town Treasurer to 
cancel said Bonds or take any action in connection with 
the purchase and cancellation of Schoolhouse Bonds. 

ART. 10. To hear the report of the Selectmen in 
regard to changes in the By-Laws and enact anything 
in relation to the same. 

ART. 11. To see if the Town will provide any money 
towards the Washington Memorial to be erected at 
Washington, D. C. 

ART. 12. To see if the Town will extend the electric 
lights, street and commercial, from Mr. Charles S. 
Wheeler's Lane to the State road opposite the beginning 
of the Virginia Road. 

ART. 13. To see if the Town will authorize the 
Water Commissioners to install a pump and make pro- 
vision for payment of the same. 



174 

ART. 14. To see if the Town will remove the hy- 
drant now standing in the path or sidewalk adjacent to 
Saint Joseph's Church in South Lincoln, or take any 
action in reference to the matter. 

ART. 15. To see if the Town will extend the elec- 
tric lights from Story's Corner to Waltham Line via 
Andrew J. Dougherty's. 

ART. 16. To see if the Town will extend the water 
pipe from I. N. MacRae's to a point opposite the house 
of Miss Carrie B. Chapin. 

ART. 17. To see if the Town out of regard and 
respect for Mr. George G. Tarbell, George F. Bemis and 
Charles Francis Adams, men who have been of great 
service to the Town, will have terra cotta busts of them 
executed and placed either in the Town Hall or Library. 

ART. 18. To see if the Town will vote to have Mr. 
Crook, a Lincoln artist, do the work at a cost not to 
exceed $1,200. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT 

And make due return of this Warrant, with your 
doings thereon, to the Town Clerk at or before the time 
for the meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this twenty-fourth day of 
February in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine 
hundred and sixteen. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



175 



By-Laws of tie Town of Lincoln. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Middlesex, ss 

At the Superior Court, within and for the County 
of Middlesex, Anno Domini, 1897, 



The following By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln, in said 
County, are presented to this Court for approval, to wit: — 

"ARTICLE I. 

Town Meetings. 

Section 1. The annual town meeting shall be held on 
the first Monday of March in each year. 

Sect. 2. Notice of every town meeting shall be given by 
posting copies of the warrant calling the same, attested by 
the officer making service thereof, in each of the post-offices 
within the town, and in one of the churches, or one other 
public place, within the town, not less than seven days be- 
fore the day appointed for such meeting. But when, in the 
judgment of the selectmen, the interests of the town require 
a meeting to be held without giving so long a notice, a 
meeting may be called by posting attested copies of the 
warrant in the places above mentioned, and by leaving a 
printed copy thereof at each dwelling-house within the 
*^wn, at least three days before the time appointed for the 
meeting; provided that in such cases the selectmen shall 
certify that, in their opinion, the interests of the town re- 
quire that a town meeting be called upon a notice of less 
than seven days, which certificate shall be made upon, or at- 
tached to, the original warrant, and shall be served as a 
part thereof. 



176 

ARTICLE II. 

Finances. 

Section 1. The financial year shall commence with the 
tirst day of February and end with the thirty-first day of 
January annually. 

Sect. 2. The town treasurer shall have the custody of 
all funds belonging to the town except sinking funds, trust 
funds and funds for which other provision is made by law; 
and he shall pay no money from the treasury except upon a 
draft signed by a majority of the selectmen, stating the ac- 
count to which the same is chargeable. Such draft shall be 
sufficient authority to the treasurer to pay the same, and 
the payment thereof shall discharge him from all liability 
on account of the money so paid. 

Sect. 3. The water commissioners and all other boards, 
committees and officers shall, on the first day of each month f 
pay to the town treasurer all sums collected by them th» 
month previous to the custody of which the treasurer is 
entitled. 

Sect. 4. A majority of the water commissioners, school 
committee, or of any board, or committee, and any officer 
having charge of the expenditure of an appropriation, shall 
approve in writing all accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls 
properly chargeable to such appropriation, and shall trans- 
mit the same with his or their approval to the selectmen. 
All other accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls shall be ex- 
amined by the selectmen and, if proper, shall be approved 
by them. The selectmen shall label all accounts, claims, 
bills and pay-rolls which have been approved either by 
themselves or by the other officers before mentioned, and 
shall keep a record thereof in a book kept for the purpose, 
stating the persons to whom payable, the amounts and 
dates thereof, and the funds, or appropriations, from which 
the same are payable. 

Sect. 5. Drafts signed by a majority of the selectmen, 
stating the accounts to which the same are chargeable, 



177 

ihall be drawn upon the treasurer for the payment of all 
sums by law payable from the treasury to the common- 
wealth or county, final judgments of courts, bonds, notes. 
and scrip of the town and interest thereon and money pay- 
able to the commissioners of the sinking fund and to the 
trustees of the public library; and also for the payment of 
all accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls which have been 
approved in the manner provided in the previous section 
Such drafts shall not be negotiated, but shall be trans 
mitted by the selectmen directly to the treasurer accom- 
panied by the approved bills or other documents for the 
settlement of which the drafts are drawn. 

Sect. 6. The treasurer shall file and safely keep all ap- 
proved and receipted accounts, claims, bills, and pay-rolls, 
and all vouchers, cancelled bonds, notes scrip, and other 
evidences of indebtedness of the town which have been paid 
from the treasury. 

Sect. 7. No draft shall be drawn by the selectmen un- 
less there is sufficient appropriation to pay the same, except 
for sums by law payable to the commonwealth or county, 
final judgments of courts, bonds, notes and scrip of the 
town and interest thereon, and money payable to the com* 
missioners of the sinking fund. 

Sect. 8. The selectmen and treasurer respectively shal? 
make a record, in a book kept for the purpose, of each ap 
propriation, with a list of the drafts drawn against such 
appropriation, and shall make a record of all bonds, notes, 
scrip or other evidence of indebtedness of the town, signed 
"T countersigned by them. 

Sect. 9. When the bills contracted or approved by any 
board, committee, or officer have exhausted the entire ap- 
propriation for such board, committee or officer, they shall 
incur no further expenditure, except in cases where such 
expenditure may be required by law; and it shall be the 
duty of each board, committee or officer before the close of 
the financial year to approve all accounts, claims, bills and 
pay-rolls chargeable to their appropriation. During the in- 



178 

terval between the thirty-first day of January in each year 
and the time of making the next annual appropriations, 
the selectmen, school committee and water commissioners, 
in order to meet the liabilities of their several dpartments, 
incurred in the carrying on of the work entrusted to them, 
shall have authority to make expenditures and payments 
from the treasury from any available funds therein, and the 
same shall be charged against the next annual appropria- 
tion. Such expenditure and liability incurred for any pur- 
pose shall not exceed one-fourth the entire amount appro- 
priated for that purpose in the previous year. 

Sect. 10. Unless the town shall expressly otherwise 
vote, no extension of water pipes shall be made unless be- 
fore the work of construction is begun one or more of the 
persons whom it is proposed to supply with water by means 
of such extension, shall file with the town clerk a bond with 
sureties satisfactory to the water commissioners, condi- 
tioned to pay to the town for five years next following the 
completion of such extension and the letting of water into 
the same, a sum sufficient, together with the net annual in- 
come from such extension, to amount annually to five per 
centum of the total cost thereof. 



ARTICLE III. 

Town Seal. 

Section 1. The design of the town seal shall be: a circle, 
in the border the words "Lincoln. Incorporated in 1746 as 
a precinct: in 1754 as a Town;" in the center, a shield, in 
the chief or upper part of which on a cross, gules, a fleur- 
de-lis, gold, from the old seal of Lincoln, England, and in 
the base of the shield a view of the present town hall ; crest, 
the old chestnut tree standing upon the common in Lincoln; 
In sal tire two shepherd's crooks; the device thereof being as 
follows: 



179 



Sect. 2. All deeds and other legal documents made, 
given or entered into by the town requiring a seal shall be 
sealed with the town seal, and signed in behalf of the town 
by a majority of the selectmen. 

Sect. 3. The town clerk shall have the custody of- the 
town seal. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Records. 

Section 1. The town clerk shall record in full in a boo! 
kept for the purpose all written contracts, deeds and othei 
instruments to which the town is a party except such in- 
struments as may by law be recorded in the Registry of 
Deeds; and it shall be the duty of any board or officer exe- 
cuting or receiving such written contract, or other instru- 
ment, to deliver the same forthwith to the town clerk for 
the purpose of record. It shall be the duty of the town 
clerk to see that all conveyances of real estate to the town 
are properly recorded in the Registry of Deeds. 

Sect. 2. The town clerk shall keep a file of Jll town re- 
ports, reports of all committees chosen by the tow - ?, and all 
original documents relating to the affairs of the tow J which 
may come into his possession. 

ARTICLE V. 

Books. 

Section 1. Books, records and laws received by the town 
from the commonwealth shall be deposited in the public 
library building. 

Sect. 2. It shall be the duty of the town officer by whom 
any book mentioned in the preceding section is received, to 
cause the same to be at once deposited in the public library 
building. 

Sect. 3. Such books may be used by the inhabitants of 
the town within such building, and may be taken therefrom 
upon written receipt to the librarian for a period not ex- 
ceeding one day at any one time for use in any town meet- 
ing, or by or before any committee or official of the town. 



180 
ARTICLE VI. 

Suits and Controversies. 

Section 1. The selectmen may compromise claims and 
suits to which the town is a party, provided that they shall 
act upon the advice of counsel when the amount claimed by 
or against the town exceeds $200.00. 

Sect. 2. The selectmen shall have, unless it is otherwise 
voted by the town, full authority as agents of the town to 
institute and prosecute suits or other proceedings in the 
name of the town before any tribunal, to appear and repre- 
sent or defend the town before any tribunal in all suits and 
other proceedings against the town or in which the town 
has an interest, to employ counsel for the purpose aforesaid 
and for other purposes when it may be expedient to do so, 
and to take all necessary and proper measures for the pro- 
tection of the interests and rights of the town. 

Sect. 3. If the town shall, at any meeting called for the 
purpose, choose, a committee on claims, such committee 
shall have and exercise exclusively all the powers and 
duties conferred upon the selectmen by the two preceding 
sections. 

ARTICLE VII. 

Reports and Publications by the Town. 

Section 1. The annual reports of the town officers, 
boards and committees shall be prepared in form suitable 
for printing on or before the tenth day of February in each 
year. The selectmen shall cause such reports to be printed 
and distributed to the legal voters of the town seven days 
at least before the annual meeting. 

Sect. 2. The selectmen shall cause to be printed and 
bound each year with the annual reports of the town 
officers, boards and committees, a copy of the records of the 
town meetings during the preceding year; a statement of 
all devises, bequests and donations to the town during the 



181 

preceding year; a list of all laws of the commonwealth ac- 
cepted by the town during the year; all by-laws adopted by 
the town since the preceding annual report; copies of the 
laying out, alteration, locating anew or discontinuance of 
any highway or townway within the limits of the town dur- 
ing the preceding year; and a statement of all outstanding 
bonds, notes and obligations of the town for the payment 
of money. 

Sect. 3. The selectmen shall from time to time cause to 
be printed a sufficient number of copies of the by-laws of 
the- town and shall incorporate therewith a list of the laws 
of the commonwealth which have been accepted by the 
town. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

Truants. 

Section 1. Any minor being an habitual truant, and any 
child between the ages of seven and fifteen years found 
wandering about the streets or public places within the 
town having no lawful occupation or business, not attend- 
ing school, and growing up in ignorance, and such children 
as persistently violate the reasonable rules and regulations 
of the public schools, may upon conviction thereof be com- 
mitted to the Middlesex County Truant School at Chelms- 
ford, Mass., or to any other place provided by the town 
within its limits, for confinement, instruction, and disci- 
pline. 

ARTICLE IX. 

Public Regulations. 

Section 1. No person shall coast upon any public street 
or part thereof after the selectmen have posted a notice 
prohibiting coasting upon such street or part thereof. 

Sect. 2. No person, unless authorized by law, shall 
break or dig up any part of any street without a written 
permit therefor from the selectmen. Every person who 



182 

after obtaining such permit shall obstruct or render unsafe 
any public street, shall guard the same by a proper fence or 
railing, and by lights during the night time, subject to the 
approval of the selectmen. Such permit may be revoked at 
any time. 

Sect. 3. No person shall be or remain in any doorway, 
or upon any stairs, doorstep, portico or other projection 
from any house or building, or upon or against any wall or 
fence on or near any street or public place, after having 
been requested by the owner or any occupant of the 
premises or by any constable or police officer to remove 
therefrom. 

Sect. 4. No person shall make, write, print, paint, cut or 
post any indecent or obscene marks, words, figures or signs 
upon any fence, building, post, tree or other object exposed 
to public view. 

Sect. 5. No person shall wilfully injure, mar, deface or 
destroy any fence, signboard, guideboard, lamp-post, lamp 
or lantern in any street or public place, nor extinguish any 
street light, nor extinguish or remove any light placed to 
denote an obstruction or a defect in any public street or 
way, without proper authority to do so. 

Sect. 6. Any person who shall offend against any of the 
provisions of this article shall forfeit and pay, for each 
offense, a sum not exceeding twenty dollars." 

Which said By-Laws being seen and understood by the 
Court, are on this nineteenth day of June, A. D. 1897, ap- 
proved. 

In testimony that the foregoing is a true copy 
of record, I hereto set my hand and affix the seal 
of said Court, this twenty-second day of June, 
A. D. 1897. 

RALPH M. SMITH, Ass't Clerk. 



183 



INDEX 



Page 

Town Officers, 1915 3-5 

Proceedings of Town Meetings, 1915 7-37 

Town Clerk's Report 38-42 

Recommendations for Appropriations 44-45 

Selectmen's Report 44-62 

"Increase of Taxation." Address Charles Francis Adams . . 63-69 

Auditor's Report 43 

Expenditures for the year 71-87 

Report of Assessors 108-125 

Report of Town Treasurer 95 

Report of the Cemetery Commissioners 139-140 

Report of Town Treasurer in account Cemetery Commissioners . 14 1 

Report of Commissioner of Sinking Fund 96-97 

Report of Treasurer Commissioners Trust Funds .... 98-104 

Report of Treasurer Bemis Lecture Fund 105-106 

Report of Water Commissioners 126-138 

Report of Tree Warden 142-143 

Report of Forest Warden 135 

Report of Board of Health 107 

Report of Supt. of Streets 92-94 

Report of Inspector of Animals 88-90 

Report of Fire Engineers 91 

Report of Trustees of Lincoln Public Library . . . 144 

Library Statistics 146 

Report of Treasurer of Lincoln Library 145 

List of Accessions to Library 147-151 

School Reports . 153-169 

School Expenditures 158 

Report of School C6mmittee 153-157 

Report of Superintendent of Schools 159-164 

School Calendar and Statistics 167-168 

Roll of Honor 165-166 

Tabular Statement 169 

Warrant, 1916 171-174 

By-Laws of the Town 175-182 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



For the Year 1916 

ALSO THE 



Reports of the School and other Committees 



FOR THE YEAR 1916 




BOSTON: 
GEO. E. CROSBY CO., PRINTERS 

394 Atlantic Avenue 
1917 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 

OF THE 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

For the Year 1916 

ALSO THE 

Reports of the School and other Committees 

FOR THE YEAR 1916 



BOSTON: 

GEO. E. CROSBY CO., PRINTERS 

394 Atlantic Avenue 

1917 



Town Officers, 1916-1917 



Town Clerk. 
ARTHUR F. CHAPIN. 

Selectmen and Overseers of the Poor. 
CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, ROBERT D. DONALDSON 

Board of Health. 

R. D. DONALDSON Term expires 1917 

CHARLES E. CLARK " " 1918 

MARTIN M. WELCH " " 1919 

Assessors. 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN Term expires 1917 

CHARLES S. WHEELER M "1918 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE " " 1919 



Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 
CHARLES S. WHEELER. 

Auditor. 
JAMES W. LENNON. 

Constables. 
JOHN J. KELLIHER, GEORGE E. CUNNINGHAM. 

Commissioners of Trust Funds. 

JULIUS E. EVELETH Term expires 1917 

CHARLES S. SMITH " " 1918 

C. LEE TODD " " 1919 



Tree Warden. 
JOHN J. KELLIHER. 

Trustees for Bemis Fund for Free Public Lectures. 

JULIUS E. EVELETH Term expires 1917 

EDWARD F. FLINT ...... " " 1918 

C. LEE TODD " " 1919 

Trustees of Grammar School Fund. 
CHARLES S. WHEELER, GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

JULIUS E. EVELETH. 

Trustees of Lincoln Library. 

GEORGE G. TARBELL, JOHN F. FARRAR, 

CHARLES LEE TODD. 
CHARLES S. SMITH, Chairman of Selectmen, ex-ofiicio. 
HENRY E. WARNER, Chairman School Committee, ex-officio. 



CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 



Registrars. 



ROBERT D. DONALDSON. 
ARTHUR F. CHAPIN. 



School Committee. 

HENRY E. WARNER Term expires 1917 

ELIZABETH BLODGETT " " 1918 

ANTHONY J. DOHERTY " " 1919 

Water Commissioners. 

JOHN ADAMS Term expires 1917 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN " " 1918 

JOSEPH S. HART " " 1919 



5 



Field Drivers. 

JOHN TASKER, FRANCIS J. MOYXIHAM, 

WILLIAM E. WATSOX. 



Fence Viewers. 
JOHN F. FARRAR, WM. H. SHERMAN. 

Surveyor of Lumber. 
RICHARD A. SHEPARD. 

M< usurers of Wood and Bark. 
SAMUEL FARRAR, JOHN F. FARRAR. 

Cemetery Commissioners. 

ROGER SHERMAN Term expires 1917 

CHARLES S. SMITH M " 1918 

JULIUS E. EVELETH " 1919 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 



Proceedings of a Town Meeting held March 6, 1916 

WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln, in 
said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify the legal voters of said 
Town of Lincoln, qualified to vote at Town Meeting for 
the transaction of Town affairs, to meet in the Town 
Hall, in said Lincoln, on Monday, the sixth day of 
March next, at 11.30 o'clock A. M. by posting a copy 
of this Warrant by you attested, in each of the Post 
Offices and in some other public place in said Town, 
seven days at least before the said sixth day of March, 
then and there to act upon the following Articles : 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot will be open 
at 12 o'clock noon and may be closed at 6.30 o'clock P. M. 

ARTICLE 1. To choose a Moderator. 

ART. 2. To bring in their votes for the following 
Town Officers, and any other officers required by law to 
be elected by ballot or otherwise, also any committees, 
commissioners and trustees. 

Three Selectmen for one year. 

One member of the Board of Assessors for three years. 



8 

One member of the Board of Health for three years. 

One Treasurer for one year. 

One Collector for one year. 

One Auditor for one year. 

Two Constables for one year. 

One Tree Warden for one year. 

One member of the Trust Fund Commissioners for 
three years. 

One member of Trustees for Free Public Lectures for 
three years. 

One member of the School Committee for three years. 

One member of the Board of Water Commissioners 
for three years. 

One member of the Board of Cemetery Commissioners 
for three years. 

Also to vote "Yes" or "No" upon the following ques- 
tion: 

"Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in this Town?" 

ART. 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committee, Commissioners and Trustees. 

ART. 4. To appropriate money for necessary and 
expedient purposes of the Town and enact anything in 
relation to the same. 

ART. 5. To determine the manner of collecting 
taxes for the ensuing year. 

ART. 6. To determine the compensation of the 
Collector of Taxes for the ensuing year. 



9 



ART. 7. To see if the Town will authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
during the municipal year, beginning February 1, 1916, 
in anticipation of the collection of taxes for the said 
year, such sums of money as may be necessary for the 
current expenses of the Town, but not exceeding the 
total tax levy for the said year, giving the notes of the 
Town in payment therefor, payable in one year from the 
date thereof. All debts incurred under authority of this 
vote shall be paid from taxes of the present municipal 
year. 

ART. 8. To see if the Town will choose a Committee 
on Claims under the provisions of Section 3, Article 6 
of the By-Laws. 

ART. 9. To see if the Town will authorize and 
direct the Commissioners of Sinking and Trust Funds 
to deliver to the Town Treasurer all of the Schoolhouse 
Bonds which they have purchased, together with any 
accumulated cash, and direct the Town Treasurer to 
cancel said Bonds or take any action in connection with 
the purchase and cancellation of Schoolhouse Bonds. 

ART. 10. To hear the report of the Selectmen in 
regard to changes in the By-Laws and enact anything 
in relation to the same. 

ART. 11. To see if the Town will provide any money 
towards the Washington Memorial to be erected at 
Washington, D. C. 

ART. 12. To see if the Town will extend the electric 
lights, street and commercial, from Mr. Charles S. 
Wheeler's Lane to the State Road opposite the beginning 
of the Virginia Road. 



10 



ART. 13. To see if the Town will authorize the 
Water Commissioners to install a pump and make pro- 
vision for payment of the same. 

ART. 14. To see if the Town will remove the hy- 
drant now standing in the path or sidewalk adjacent to 
Saint Joseph's Church in South Lincoln, or take any 
action in reference to the matter. 

ART. 15. To see if the Town will extend the elec- 
tric lights from Story's Corner to Waltham Line via 
Andrew J. Dougherty's. 

ART. 16. To see if the Town will extend the water 
pipe from I. N. MacRae's to a point opposite the house 
of Miss Carrie B. Chapin. 

ART. 17. To see if the Town out of regard and 
respect for Mr. George G. Tarbell, George F. Bemis and 
Charles Francis Adams, men who have been of great 
service to the Town, will have terra cotta busts of them 
executed and placed either in the Town Hall or Library. 

ART. 18. To see if the Town will vote to have Mr. 
Crook, a Lincoln artist, do the work at a cost not to 
exceed $1,200. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT 

And make due return of this Warrant, with your 
doings thereon, to the Town Clerk at or before the time 
for the meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this twenty-fourth day of 
February in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine 
hundred and sixteen. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



11 . 

The return on the Warrant is as follows : 

Lincoln, February 28, 1916. 
I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy in each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad 
Station seven days before date of said meeting. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Constable of Lincoln. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant the meeting was called 
to order by the Town Clerk and the Warrant read. 

Under Article 1, voted and chose Charles S. Wheeler, 
Moderator. 

Under Article 2, Thomas L. Giles and Andrew J. 
Dougherty, Jr., having been appointed Tellers and 
Thomas J. Dee and Charles E. Clark as Ballot Clerks, 
w T ere sworn. 

A package of ballots, said to contain 400 Regular 
Ballots and 100 School Committee Ballots was delivered 
by the Town Clerk to the Ballot Clerks and their receipt 
taken for the same. 

The Ballot Box was opened and examined, the counter 
showing 0, the box being empty, was locked and 
the keys delivered to the Constable. 

At 12 o'clock noon, the polls were opened and remained 
open until 6.30 o'clock P.M. 

Before the polls w r ere opened it was voted that when 
this meeting adjourns it does so to meet in Bemis Hall 
at one o'clock, Saturday, March eleven. 

The polls were closed at 6.30 o'clock P.M., the counter 
on the Ballot Box showing 19 7, which corresponded 
with the Check Lists used by the Ballot Clerks and 
Tellers. 



12 



Upon the ballots being counted the following vote was 
disclosed, and was announced by the Moderator: — 



Town Clerk- 




Arthur F. Chapin, sworn, 
Harold S. Cousins, 
Blank, 


121 votes. 
63 " 
12 " 


Selectmen. — 




Robert D. Donaldson, sworn, 
John F. Farrar, sworn, 
James L. Roche, 
Charles S. Smith, sworn, 


147 votes. 
159 " 
60 " 
152 " 


Assessor, 3 years. — 

William C. Peirce, sworn, 
Blank, 


173 votes. 
23 " 


Treasurer. — 




Charles S. Wheeler, sworn, 
Frank Moynihan, 
J. Connair, 
Blank, 


168 votes. 
1 " 

1 " 

26 " 


Collector of Taxes. — 




Charles S. Wheeler, sworn, 
James Ryan, 
Fritz Cunnert, 
Blank, 


173 votes, 
1 " 
1 " 
21 " 


Auditor. — 




James W. Lennon, 
Blank, 


178 votes, 
18 " 



13 



Constables. — 

George E. Cunningham, sworn, 
John J. Kelliher, sworn, 
H. Butcher, 



173 votes. 
172 " 
1 " 



School Committee, 3 years. — 




Anthony J. Doherty, 


164 votes, 


Blank, 


33 " 


Water Commissioner, 3 years. — 




Joseph S. Hart, 


104 votes 


Sumner Smith, 


89 " 


John Adams, 


1 " 


Blank, 


2 " 



Water Commissioner, 1 year, to fill vacancy. 
John Adams, 
C. E. Clark, 
F. Cunnert, 
J. S. Hart, 
Purslow, 
S. Smith, 
Martin Sherman, 
Blank, 



83 


votes 


1 


it 


1 


a 


3 


a 


1 


it 


6 


a 


1 


it 


100 


cc 



Board of Health, 3 years. — 
Martin M. Welch, 
C. E. Clark, 
Blank, 



160 votes. 
1 " 
35 " 



14 



Board of Health, 2 years to fill vacancy. — 
C. E. Clark, 
J. Adams, 
J. J. Connair, 
J. S. Hart, 
H. Snelling, 
R. D. Donaldson, 
F. Cunnert, 
Blank, 

Tree Warden. — 
John J. Kelliher, 
Blank, 

Cemetery Commissioner, 3 years. — 
Julius E. Eveleth, 
C. S. Smith, 
Blank, 

Commissioner of Trust Funds, 3 years.- 
C. Lee Todd, 
Blank, 



74 


votes. 


1 






1 






2 






1 






1 






1 






115 




175 


votes. 


21 


a 


163 


votes. 


1 


a 


32 


u 


160 votes. 


36 




u 



Trustee for Bemis Fund for Free Public Lectures, 3 years 
C. Lee Todd, 158 votes. 

J. J. Connair, 1 " 

Blank, 37 " 

Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 

liquors in the town? 

Yes, 27 votes. 

No, 139 " 

Blank, 30 " 

After the announcement of the result of the ballot, 

it was voted to adjourn. 



15 



March 11, 1916. The Moderator again read the 
result of the ballot and the officers present who were 
elected were sworn. 

The following officers were then chosen: — 

Field Drivers. — 

John Tasker. 

Francis J. Moynihan, sworn. 

William E. Watson. 



Fence Viewers. — 

John F. Farrar, sworn. 
William H. Sherman, sworn. 



Surveyor of Lumber. — 
Richard A. Shepard. 

Measurers of Wood and Bark. 

Samuel Farrar. 
John F. Farrar. 



ART. 3. All of the printed reports of the Town 
Book were accepted except the Water Commissioners' 
report, which report was voted to lie on the table. 



16 



ART. 4. Voted and appropriated: 




For Schools 


$12,500.00 


Schools, to be taken from the Treasury 


2,500.00 


Support of Poor .... 


500.00 


Highways and Bridges 


. 


12,000.00 


Library — The Dog Tax and 




500.00 


Interest .... 




500.00 


Cemeteries 




500.00 


Board of Health 




200.00 


Tree Warden 




400.00 


Suppression of Gypsy and Brown Tail ] 


Vloths 2,100.00 


Miscellaneous Expenses . 


5,000.00 


Hydrant and other Water Service . 


2,400.00 


Waltham Hospital, Free Bed 


250.00 


Street Lamps .... 




1,800.00 



For Fire Department. Voted, That the sum of 
$2,500 be appropriated to purchase a Motor Truck, to be 
taken from money in the treasury and that the Mod- 
erator appoint a committee not exceeding seven in 
number to purchase and provide for the proper caie of 
the same. The Chair appointed the Fire Engineers 
and Messrs. C. Lee Todd and Sumner Smith. 

For Payment Schoolhouse Bonds . $3,000.00 

Interest Schoolhouse Bonds . . . 1,080.00 
Payment of Water Bonds (to be taken 

from Water Works Income) . . 1,000.00 

Water Works Sinking Fund (to be taken 

from Water Works Income) . . 1,500.00 

Voted, That the sum of $15,000 be appropriated 
from available funds in the treasury to retire the School- 
house Bonds and that the Sinking Fund Commissioners 
be a committee to purchase the same, and when any 
bonds are purchased, that the same be turned over to 
the Town Treasurer to be cancelled. 



17 



Voted, That the sum of $4,500 be appropriated for 
the current expenses of the Water Works, not including 
any appropriations for a new pump, and that the said 
sum of $4,500 be taken from current Water Works 
receipts. 

ART. 5. Voted, To collect the taxes in the same way 
and manner as last year. 

Interest at the rate of 6 r c a year be charged on all 
taxes not paid on or before October 15, and the Col- 
lector is authorized to collect the tax of any person, after 
the said fifteenth of October, either by distiess or im- 
prisonment. 

ART. 6. Voted, That the compensation of the Col- 
lector of Taxes be ll'2% of the amount collected. 

ART. 7. Voted, That the Town Treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is, authorized 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of 
the taxes of the municipal year beginning January 1, 
1916, to an amount not exceeding the total levy for the 
said year, and to issue notes therefor, payable within 
one year. Any debt or debts incurred under this vote 
to be paid from taxes of the said municipal year. 

ART. 8. Voted, To pass over the Article. 

ART. 9. Voted, That the Town authorize and direct 
the Commissioners of Sinking and Trust Funds to 
deliver to the Town Treasurer all of the Schoolhouse 
Bonds which they have purchased, together with any 
accumulated cash, and the Town Treasurer is hereby 
directed to cancel the bonds so delivered. 



18 

ART. 10. Voted, Section 1 of Article 1 of the 
By-Laws is hereby amended so as to read as follows: 

Section 1. The Annual Town Meeting shall be held 
on the Saturday following the first Monday of February 
in each year for the purpose of transacting all business 
which may properly come before the Town, except the 
election of Town officers required to be chosen by official 
ballot, 

Such officers shall be elected at an adjourned meeting 
the same day or some other day not later than the next 
following Saturday. 

Voted, Section 1 of Article 2 of the By-Laws is hereby 
amended so as to read as follows: 

Section 1. The financial year shall commence with 
the first day of January and end with the thirty-first 
day of December annually. 

Voted, Article 9 of the By-Laws is hereby amended 
by inserting after Section 5 the following Section : 

"No person shall do business within the Town as a 
junk dealer or peddler without a license therefor duly 
issued by the Selectmen." 

Voted, That the Selectmen be authorized and directed 
to present the By-Laws, this day adopted, to the At- 
torney-General of the Commonwealth for approval and 
cause publication thereof to be made as may be required 
by law. 

ART. 11. Voted, To pass over. 
ART. 12. Voted, To pass over. 



19 



ART. 13. Voted, That a sum not exceeding $2,500 
be appropriated for and tbe whole matter of a new pump 
be left to the Water Commissioners with full powers. 

ART. 14. Voted, That the Water Commissioners be 
authorized to move the hydrant standing in the side- 
walk adjacent to St. Joseph's Church to the opposite 
side of the road. 

ART. 15. Voted, That the whole matter be left to 
the Selectmen with full powers. 

ART. 16. Voted, To extend the water pipe from 
I. N. MacRae's place to a point opposite the house of 
Miss Carrie B. Chapin, payment to be made from 
current income of the Water Works. 

ARTS. 17 and 18. Taken up together. On account 
of the objections of Mr. Crook to the substance of the 
Articles, it was voted to pass over Articles. 

Voted, To adjourn. 
Attest : 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



20 



April 1, 1916. John J. Kelliher was this day sworn 
as Forest Tree Warden by 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

April 26, 1916. Arthur S. Russell was this day sworn 
as Special Police (to be paid by the Boston & Maine 
R.R. Co.), also John F. Farrar sworn as Special Police 
by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Notary Public. 

A true copy. 
Attest: 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



May 20, 1916. Lorenzo E. Brooks was this day 
sworn as Special Police for the ensuing year by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Notary Public. 

A true copy. 
Attest : 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

January 23, 1916. Charles S. Wheeler was this day 
sworn as Special Police by 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



21 



Proceedings of the Presidential Primary, held 
April 25, 1 91 6 

WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby 
required to notify and warn the inhabitants of said Town 
who are qualified to vote in Primaries to meet in Town 
Hall, Tuesday, the Twenty-fifth day of April, 1916, 
at 7 o'clock P.M., foi the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for 
the election of candidates of political parties for the 
following offices: 

Four Delegates-at-Large to the National Convention 
of the Republican Party. 

Four Alternate Delegates-at-Large to the National 
Convention of the Republican Party. 

Four Delegates-at-Large to the National Convention 
of the Democratic Party. 

Four Alternate Delegates-at-Large to the National 
Convention of the Democratic Party. 

Eight Delegates-at-Large to the National Convention 
of the Prohibition Party. 

Eight Alternate Delegates-at-Large to the National 
Convention of the Prohibition Party. 

Two District Delegates to the National Convention of 
the Republican Party, Congressional District. 



22 



Two Alternate District Delegates to the National 
Convention of the Republican Party, Congressional 
District. 

Two District Delegates to the National Convention 
of the Democratic Party, Congressional District. 

Two Alternate District Delegates to the National 
Convention of the Democratic Party, Congressional 
District. 

One District Delegate to the National Convention 
of the Prohibition Party, Congressional District. 

One Alternate District Delegate to the National Con- 
vention of the Prohibition Party, Congressional District. 

All the above candidates and officers are to be voted 
for upon one ballot. 

The polls will be open from seven to nine P.M. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting 
attested copies thereof seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting as directed by vote of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this fifteenth day of April, 
A.D., 1916. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

The return on the Warrant is as follows: 

Lincoln, April 17, 1916. 
I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy in each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad 
Station seven days before the date of said meeting. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Constable. 



23 



Pursuant to the above Warrant the meeting was 
called to order by the Chairman of the Selectmen, who 
read the Warrant. 

Herbert G. Farrar, Thomas L. Giles, James W. 
Lennon and Thomas J. Dee were sworn as Tellers and 
Ballot Clerks. 

A package of ballots said to contain 450 ballots was 
delivered by the Clerk to the Ballot Clerks and their 
receipt for the same taken. 

The Ballot Box was opened and examined and then 
locked, the counter showing 0, and the keys then 
given to the Constable. 

The polls were opened at 7 o'clock P.M. and remained 
open until 9 o'clock P.M. 

There were forty-three Republican ballots, four 
Democratic ballots and one Blank ballot, making a total 
of 48 ballots. 

The count of the Republican votes was as follows: 

DELEGATES-AT-LARGE.— 

Grafton D. Cushing of Boston, 
Charles Sumner Bird of Walpole, 
Augustus P. Gardner of Hamilton, 
Robert M. Washburn of Worcester, 
Samuel W. McCall of Winchester, 
Henry Cabot Lodge of Nahant, 
John W. Weeks of Newton, 
Winthrop M. Cram of Dalton, 



19 


votes 


19 


a 


18 


ti 


18 


it 


24 


(i 


23 


a 


22 


ti 


oi 


a 



12 


votes 


11 


tt 


11 


tt 


11 


tt 


21 


tt 


22 


tt 


21 


a 


99 


u 



24 

ALTERNATE DELEGATES-AT-LARGE, 

Alexander McGregor of Boston, 
Lombard Williams of Dedham, 
David Cosgrove of Lowell, 
William M. Armstrong of Somerville, 
Butler Ames of Lowell, 
Louis A. Frothingham of Boston, 
Eben S. S. Keith of Bourne, 
Frank W. Stearns of Newton, 



DISTRICT DELEGATES, Fifth District.— 

Fred 0. Lewis of Lowell, 11 votes. 

Frederick P. Glazier of Hudson, 11 " 

Herbert E. Fletcher of Westford, 20 " 

John N. Cole of Andover, 20 " 



The count of the Democratic vote is as follows : 

DELEGATES-AT-LARGE.— 

David I. Walsh of Fitchburg, 
Joseph H. O'Neil of Boston, 
Humphrey 0' Sullivan of Lowell, 
Charles B. Strecker of Boston, 

ALTERNATE DELEGATES-AT-LARGE. 

H. Oscar Rocheleau of Worcester, 
Edmund D. Codman of Boston, 
Vincent Brogan of Boston, 
Thomas F. Higgins of Fall River, 

DISTRICT DELEGATES, Fifth Dislrict.- 

Robert J. Crowley of Lowell, 
J. Joseph O'Connor of Lowell, 



4 


votes 


4 


u 


4 


a 


4 


a 


3 


votes. 


3 


n 


3 


u 


3 


a 


2 


votes. 


2 


tt 



25 

ALTERNATE DISTRICT DELEGATES.— 

John T. Donahue of Lowell, 3 votes. 

Joseph P. Donahue of Lowell, 3 " 

Attest: 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

June 27, 1916. Isaac Langille was this day sworn 
Special Police for the ensuing year by 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

July 7, 1916. Frank H. Cunningham was this day 
sworn Special Police for the ensuing year by 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



26 



JURY LIST FOR 1916 
As prepared by the Selectmen of Lincoln. 



Name 



P. 0. Address 



Adams, John, So. Lincoln 
Bamforth, Fred J., Jr., So. Lincoln 
Brooks, Lorenzo E., Concord, R. F. D. 
Calkins, James T., So. Lincoln, R. F. D. 
Chapin, Arthur F., Lincoln 
Clark, Charles E., Lincoln 
Corrigan, Patrick F., So. Lincoln 
Cousins, Fred E., So. Lincoln 
Crook, Russell G., So. Lincoln 
Cunnert, Fritz. Lincoln 
Dougherty, Andrew J., Jr., Lincoln 
Farnsworth, Charles P., So. Lincoln 
Farrar, Herbert W., So. Lincoln 
Farrar, John F., So. Lincoln 
Flint, Ephraim B., Lincoln 
Giles, Thomas L., So. Lincoln 
Gordon, Donald, So. Lincoln 
Johnson, Walter W., Lincoln 
Kelliher, John J., So. Lincoln 
Koch, Richard, So. Lincoln 
Laird, Ludwig V. A., Lincoln 
Lennon, James W., So. Lincoln 
McHugh. John E., Concord, R. F. D. 
Nelson, JohD W., Lexington, R. F. D. 
Neville, James M., Lexington, R. F. D. 
Rice, Edwin B., So. Lincoln, R. F. D. 
Simms, John W., So. Lincoln 
Snelling, Howard, So. Lincoln 
Tarbell, George G., Lincoln 
Wheeler, Abner S., So. Lincoln 



Occupation 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Gateman 

Clerk 

Carpenter 

Clerk 

Grain Dealer 

Sculptor 

Laborer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Carpenter 

Lawyer 

Farmer 

Tree Warden 

Mechanic 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Painter 

Farmer 

Agent 

Clerk 



CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



27 



Proceedings of the State Primary, held 
September 26, 1916 

WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constable? of the Town of Lincoln. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby 
required to notify and warn the inhabitants of said Town, 
who are qualified to vote in Primaries, to meet in Town 
Hall, Tuesday, the Twenty-sixth day of September, 
1916, at 3 o'clock P.M., for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Piimary Officers for the 
nomination of candidates of political parties for the 
following offices: 

Governor for this Commonwealth. 

Lieutenant-Governor for this Commonwealth. 

Secretary of the Commonwealth, for this Common- 
wealth. 

Treasurer and Receiver-General for this Common- 
wealth. 

Auditor of the Commonwealth, for this Common- 
wealth. 

Attorney-General, for this Commonwealth. 

Senator in Congress, for this Commonwealth. 

Representative in Congress, for Fifth Congressional 
District. 



28 



Councillor, for Sixth Councillor District. 

Senator, for Fifth Senatorial District. 

Representative in General Court, for Thirteenth 
Representative District. 

County Commissioner, for Middlesex County. 

Two Associate Commissioners, for Middlesex County. 

District Attorney, for Northern District. 

Clerk of the Courts for Middlesex County. 

Register of Deeds for Middlesex County. 

Register of Probate and Insolvency for Middlesex 
County (to fill vacancy). 

And for the election of the following officers : 

District Member of State Committee for each political 
party for the Fifth Senatorial District. 

Five Members of the Democratic Town Committee. 

Five Members of the Republican Town Committee. 

Five Members of the Prohibition Town Committee. 

Delegates to State Conventions of Political Parties. 

All the above candidates and officers are to be voted 
for upon one ballot. 

The polls will be open from three to eight P. M., and 
you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting 
attested copies thereof seven days at least before 'the 
time of said meeting as directed by vote of the Town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this sixteenth day of Sep- 
tember, A.D. 1916. 

CHARLES S. SMITH. 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



29 



Attest : 

The return on the Warrrant was as follows : 

Lincoln, Sept. 18, 1916. 
I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy in each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad 
Station seven days before the date of said meeting. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Constable. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant the meeting was 
called to order by the Chairman of the Selectmen, who 
read the Warrant. 

Thomas L. Giles and Herbert G. Farrar were sworn 
as Tellers and James W. Lennon and Thomas J. Dee as 
Ballot Clerks. 

The Polls were open from three P.M. to eight P.M. 
The total number of ballots cast was 151. 
The Republican Party vote was as follows: 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 

FOR GOVERNOR.— 

Samuel W. McCall of Winchester, 102 votes. 

FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR.— 

Calvin Coolidge of Northampton, 104 votes. 

FOR SECRETARY.— 

Albert P. Langtry of Springfield, 85 votes. 

FOR TREASURER.— 

Charles L. Burrill of Boston, 90 votes. 



30 



FOR AUDITOR.— 

Joseph B. Brown of Brookline, 
Alonzo B. Cook of Boston, 



39 votes. 
51 " 



FOR ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 
Henry C. Attwill of Lynn, 



82 votes. 



FOR SENATOR IN CONGRESS. 

Henry Cabot Lodge of Nahant, 



91 votes. 



FOR CONGRESSMAN, Fifth District. 
John Jacob Rogers of Lowell, 



90 votes. 



FOR COUNCILLOR, Sixth District.— 
James G. Harris of Medford, 
Henry C. Mulligan of Natick, 



55 votes. 
25 " 



FOR SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex District.— 

Charles Sumner Smith of Lincoln, 131 votes. 

Patrick J. Sullivan of Maynard, 4 " 



FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 

Thirteenth Middlesex District. — 
Benjamin Loring Young of Weston, 100 votes. 



FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, Middlesex.— 

Smith J. Adams of Lowell, 35 votes. 

Erson B. Barlow of Lowell, 33 " 

Charles H. Mclntire of Lowell, 13 " 



31 



FOR ASSOCIATE COMMISSIONERS, Middlesex 
County. — 
Frederic P. Barnes of Newton, 72 votes. 

H. Harding Hale of Hudson, 45 " 

FOR DISTRICT ATTORNEY, Northern District.— 
Nelson P. Brown of Everett, 9 votes. 

Philip M. Clark of Newton, 3 " 

John J. Higgins of Somerville, 11 " 

Nathan A. Tufts of Waltham, 97 " 

FOR CLERK OF COURTS, Middlesex.— 

William C. Dillingham of Maiden, 86 votes. 

FOR REGISTER OF DEED-. 

Middlesex Southern District. — 
Thomas Leighton, Jr. of Cambridge 81 votes. 

FOR REGISTER OF PROBATE AND INSOLVENT V 

Middlesex County (To fill vacancy) 
William G. Andrew of Somerville, 20 votes. 

Roland E. Brown of Cambridge, 13 " 

Frederick M. Esty of Framingham, 51 " 

FOR STATE COMMITTEE, Fifth Middlesex District 
Adelbert B. Messer of Concord, 49 votes. 

FOR DELEGATE TO STATE CONVENTION.— 

*John F. Farrar, 5 votes. 

C. S. Smith, 2 " 

J. T. Laird, 1 " 

Roger Sherman, 1 " 

Anthony J. Doherty, 1 " 
* Elected. 



32 



FOR TOWN COMMITTEE. 
*J. F. Farrar, 
*C. S. Smith, 
*Chester Sherman, 
*R. D. Donaldson, 

J. S. Hart, 

G. L. Chapin, 

J. T. Laird, 

W. C. Robus, 
*H. S. Cousins, 

H. E. Warner, 

Scattering, 

*Elected. 



14 votes. 
12 

7 

5 

2 

2 

2 

2 

3 

2 
17 



There were no votes cast for the Prohibition Party. 



The Democratic Party vote was as follows : 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



FOR GOVERNOR.— 

Charles H. Cole of Boston, 
Frederick W. Mansfield of Boston, 



3 votes. 
1 " 



FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR. 
Thomas P. Riley of Maiden, 



4 votes. 



FOR SECRETARY.— 

Leon R. Eyges of Brookline, 



4 votes. 



FOR TREASURER.— 

Henry N. Teague of Williams town, 



4 votes. 






33 

FOR AUDITOR.— 

John B. N. Soulliere of Worcester, 4 votes. 

FOR ATTORNEY-GENERAL.— 

Joseph Joyce Donahue of Medford, 4 votes. 

FOR SENATOR IN CONGRESS.— 

John F. Fitzgerald of Boston, 4 votes. 

FOR CONGRESSMAN, Fifth District.— 

Roger Sherman Hoar of Concord, 4 votes. 

FOR SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex District — 

Warren L. Bishop of Wayland, 3 votes. 

FOR DISTRICT ATTORNEY, Northern District.— 
William R. Scharton of Reading, 2 votes. 

FOR REGISTER OF PROBATE AND INSOLVENCY 

Middlesex County (To fill vacancy). — 
Timothy E. Quinn of Cambridge, 4 votes. 

FOR STATE COMMITTEE, Fifth Middlesex Dis- 
trict. — 

John F. Mitchell of Marlborough, 2 votes. 

Bernard W. Stanley of Waltham, 2 " 

FOR DELEGATE TO STATE CONVENTION.— 

Anthony J. Doherty, 1 vote. 



34 

FOR TOWN COMMITTEE. 

M. M. Welch, 
A. J. Doherty, 
P. F. Corrigan, 
T. J. Dee, 
C. L. Todd, 



vote. 

n 

a 

u 

a 



The above vote was declared in open meeting. Voted 
to adjourn. 

Attest: 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



35 



Proceedings of the National and State Elections 
held November 7, 1916. 

WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To any Constable in the Town of Lincoln, in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhab- 
itants of the Town of Lincoln, duly qualified to vote in 
the election of National, State and County Officers, to 
assemble at Town Hall, on Tuesday, November 7th, at 
seven o'clock in the forenoon, to give in their votes for the 
following officers, viz.: Presidential Electors, Governor, 
Lieutenant-Governor, Secretary, Treasurer, Auditor, 
Attorney-General, Senator in Congress, Congressman, 
Councillor, Senator, Representative in General Court, 
County Commissioner, Associate County Commissioners 
(2), District Attorney, Clerk of Courts, Register of 
Deeds, Register of Probate and Insolvency, and any 
other officer required by law to be chosen in the month 
of November of the current year. 

All officers enumerated above are to be designated and 
voted for on one ballot, and also the following questions : 

QUESTIONS. 

Acceptance of Chap. 98, General Acts of 1916, entitled 
"An Act to ascertain and carry out the will of the people 
relative to the calling and holding of a Constitutional 
Convention." 



36 



Acceptance of Chap. 104, General Acts of 1916, 
entitled "An Act to make the first day of January, 
known as New Yeai's Day, a legal holiday." 

Acceptance of Chap. 179, General Acts of 1916, 
entitled "An Act to prevent the voters of one political 
party from voting in the primaries of another political 
party." 

Question of Public Policy under Chap. 819, Acts of 
1913: "Shall the Representative or Representatives 
from this district be instructed to support the adoption 
of an amendment to the Constitution of the Common- 
wealth, providing for some form of the initiative and 
referendum which shall give to the voters the power to 
accept or reject statutes and constitutional amend- 
ments proposed to the Legislature by petition of a sub- 
stantial number of citizens, but rejected by it, and also 
the power, upon such petition, to reject measures passed 
by the Legislature?" 

The Polls to be opened at seven o'clock A.M., and may 
be closed at four o'clock P.M., and you are directed to 
serve this Warrant by posting an attested copy thereof 
in each of the Post Offices and one of the churches, or in 
some other public place, seven days at least before the 
day appointed for said meeting, and to make seasonable 
return thereof with your doings thereon to the Town 
Clerk. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

Given under our hands, this thirty-first day of Octo- 
ber, in the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred and 
sixteen. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



37 
The return on this Warrant was as follows : 

Lincoln, October 31, 1916. 
I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy in each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad 
Station, seven days before said meeting. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Constable. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant, the meeting was 
called to order by the Chairman of the Selectmen, who 
read the Warrant, administered the oath of office to 
Thomas J. Dee and Charles E. Clark as Ballot Clerks, and 
to Thomas L. Giles and Herbert G. Farrar as Tellers. 

The Polls were opened at seven o'clock A.M., with the 
counter on the Ballot Box showing 0. 

The Polls were closed at 6.15 P.M. Owing to diffi- 
culties with the recording mechanism of the Ballot Box, 
it was found necessary for the Tellers to keep a separate 
count of the number of votes cast, beside the usual check 
list. This count agreed with the two check lists, the 
number being 250. 

The same number of ballots were counted with the 
following result, which was declared in open meeting, 
after which time the ballots, together with the check 
lists, were sealed: 

Electors of President and Vice-President. 

Benson and Kirkpatrick, Socialist, No votes. 

Hanly and Landrith, Prohibition, No votes. 

Hughes and Fairbanks, Republican, 141 votes. 

At Large: — 

George v. L. Meyer of Hamilton 
Edward A. Thurston of Fall River 



38 



By Districts: — 

1. Kelton B. Miller of Pittsfield 

2.- Gurdon W. Gordon of Springfield 

3. George R. Wallace of Fitchburg 

4. Webster Thayer of Worcester 

5. Herbert E. Fletcher of Westford 

6. Isaac Patch of Gloucester 

7. Charles Cabot Johnson of Nahant 

8. Arthur Black of Winchester 

9. Charles Bruce of Everett 

10. Joseph B. Maccabe of Boston 

11. Grafton D. Cushing of Boston 

12. George F. Lawley of Boston 

13. George S. Smith of Newton 

14. Horace A. Keith of Brockton 

15. Frederick E. Goff of Taunton 

16. Phineas C. Headley, Jr. of Fairhaven 

Reimer and Harrison, Socialist Labor, No votes. 

Wilson and Marshall, Democratic, 95 votes. 

At Large: — 

David I. Walsh of Fitchburg 
Sherman L. Whipple of Brookline 

By Districts: — 

1. Harry A. Garfield of Williamstown 

2. Thomas F. Harrington of Springfield 

3. Marcus C. Coolidge of Fitchburg 

4. H. Oscar Rocheleau of Worcester 

5. Humphrey O'Sullivan of Lowell 

6. Charles F. Ropes of Salem 

7. Simeon Viger of Lawrence 

8. Eugene Wambaugh of Cambridge 

9. Marcus Beebe of Maiden 
10. William Taylor of Boston 



39 



11. Josiah Quincy of Boston 

12. John MacDonnell of Boston 

13. Edward E. Ginsburg of Boston 

14. Charles M. Hickey of Brockton 

15. John F. Doherty of Fall River 

16. Thomas C. Thacher of Yarmouth 

Blank 15 votes. 

FOR GOVERNOR.— Votes. 

James Hayes of Plymouth, Socialist Labor, 

Chester R. Lawrence of Boston, Prohibition, 1 

Samuel W. McCall of Winchester, Republican, 161 
Frederick W. Mansfield of Boston, Democratic, 69 

Dan A. White of Brockton, Socialist, 2 

Blank, 17 

FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR.— Votes. 

Calvin Coolidge of Northampton, Republican, 154 

Alfred H. Evans of Hadley, Prohibition, 2 

Sylvester J. McBride of Watertown. Socialist, 2 

Thomas J. Maher of Medford, Socialist Labor, 

Thomas P. Riley of Maiden, Democratic, 63 

Blank, 29 

FOR SECRETARY.— Votes. 

Thomas F. Brennan of Salem, Socialist Labor, 

Leon R. Eyges of Brookline, Democratic, 51 

Louise Adams Grout of Boston, Socialist, 2 
Albert P. Langtry of Springfield, Republican, 153 

Blank, 44 

FOR TREASURER.— Votes. 

Charles L. Burrill of Boston, Republican, 150 
Frederick E. Oelcher of Peabody, Socialist Labor, 1 

Elam K. Sheldon of Greenfield, Socialist, 3 
Henry N. Teague of Williamstown, Democratic, 56 

Blank, 40 



40 

FOR AUDITOR.— 

Votes. 

Joseph Bearak of Boston, Socialist, 5 

Frank Bohmbach of Boston, Socialist Labor, 

Alonzo B. Cook of Boston, Republican, 147 

John B. N. Soulliere of Worcester, Democratic, 60 

Blank, 38 



FOR ATTORNEY-GENERAL.— 

Votes. 

Henry C. Attwill of Lynn, Republican, 154 

Joseph Joyce Donahue of Medford, Democratic, 59 

Joseph Jiskra of Milford, Socialist Labor, 

John Weaver Sherman of Boston, Socialist, 3 

Blank, 34 



FOR SENATOR IN CONGRESS.— 

Votes. 
John F. Fitzgerald of Boston, Democratic, 85 

Henry Cabot Lodge of Nahant, Republican, 141 
William N. McDonald of Northampton, Socialist, 3 
Blank, 21 



FOR CONGRESSMAN, Fifth District- 
Votes. 
Roger Sherman Hoar of Concord, Democratic, 92 

John Jacob Rogers of Lowell, Republican, 133 

Blank, 25 



FOR COUNCILLOR, Sixth District— 

Votes. 
James G. Harris of Medford, Republican, 140 

Blank, 110 



41 

FOR SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex District.— 

Votes. 

Warren L. Bishop of Wayland, Democratic, 26 

Charles Sumner Smith of Lincoln, Republican, 214 
Blank, 10 

FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 

Thirteenth Middlesex District. — 

Votes. 

Benjamin Loring Young of Weston, Republican, 174 

Blank, 76 

FOR COUNTY COMM ISSIONER, Middlesex County- 
Votes. 
Erson B. Barlow of Lowell, Republican. 154 

Blank, 96 

FOR ASSOCIATE COMMISSIONERS, Middlesex 
County. — 

Votes. 
Frederic P. Barnes of Newton, Republican, 138 

H. Harding Hale of Hudson, Republican, 106 

Blank, 256 

FOR DISTRICT ATTORNEY, Northern District.— 

Votes. 
William R. Scharton of Reading, Democratic, 42 
Nathan A. Tufts of Waltham, Republican, 165 

Blank, 43 

FOR CLERK OF COURTS, Middlesex County.— 

Votes. 
William C. Dillingham of Maiden, Republican, 147 
Blank, 103 



42 



FOR REGISTER OF DEEDS, Middlesex Southern 
District. — 

Votes. 
Thomas Leighton, Jr. of Cambridge, Republican, 149 
Blank, 101 

FOR REGISTER OF PROBATE AND INSOL- 
VENCY, Middlesex County (To fill vacancy). 

Votes. 
Frederick M. Esty of Framingham, Republican, 140 
Timothy E. Quinn of Cambridge, Democratic, 51 

Blank, 59 

"Shall there be a Convention to revise, alter or amend 
the Constitution of the Commonwealth?" 

Yes, 69 votes. 

No, 56 " 

Blank, 125 " 

"Shall an Act passed by the General Court in the year 
nineteen hundred and sixteen, to make the first day of 
January, known as New Year's Day, a legal holiday, 
be approved and become law?" 

Yes, 111 votes. 

No, 63 " 

Blank, 76 " 

"Shall an Act passed by the General Court in the year 
nineteen hundred and sixteen, entitled 'An Act to prevent 
the voters of one political party from voting in the 
primaries of another political party' be approved and 
become law?" 

Yes, 77 votes. 

No, 53 " 

Blank, 120 " 



43 

"Shall the Representative or Representatives from 
this district be instructed to support the adoption of an 
amendment to the Constitution of the Commonwealth, 
providing for some form of the initiative and referendum 
which shall give to the voters the power to accept or 
reject statutes and constitutional amendments proposed 
to the Legislature by petition of a substantial number of 
citizens but rejected by it, and also the power, upon such 
petition, to reject measures passed by the Legislature?" 



Yes, 

No, 
Blank, 
Voted to adjourn. 
Attest : 



91 votes. 
35 " 
124 " 



ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



At a meeting of the Town Clerks of the Thirteenth 
Representative District of Middlesex County, held at 
Concord, Nov. 17, 1916, the vote for Representative in 
the General Court was determined as follows: 



Concord . . . 


- 


00 

D 
B 

a 


3 

> 

r 
> 

a 


H 
/ 

H 
O 

z 

395 
60 


H 

o 

► 

r 1 


Benjamin Loring Young, of Weston 

James Russell, of Concord 


685 

1 

369 


174 

76 
250 


164 
61 


305 
169 


1723 
1 


Blank 




Total 


1055 


225 


474 


455 


?459 







44 

Two certificates of the election of Benjamin Loring 
Young were prepared and signed by the clerks for 
transmission to the Secretary of the Commonwealth and 
to the Representative Elect. 

William D. Cross, Town Clerk of Concord. 

Arthur F. Chapin, Town Clerk of Lincoln. 

Frank F. Gerry, Town Clerk of Sudbury. 

Warren L. Bishop, Town Clerk of Wayland. 

Alfred L. Cushing, Town Clerk pro tern of Weston. 

Attest: 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



45 



There have been recorded during the year ending 
December 31, 1916, 19 Births, 8 Marriages, 13 Deaths. 







Births Registered. 


Date of Birth. 


Name of Child. 


Names of Parents. 


Mar. 


14, 1916 


Anna Frances Coan. 


Thomas F. and Anna A. (Crowley.) 


Apr. 


3. " 


Hazel Anna Butcher. 


Ralph E. and Annie (Philbinck.) 


April 


7, " 


Philip Alexander Davis. 


William H. and Alice M. (MacPhee.) 


April 


8, " 


Emma Frances Edwards. 


Harry L. and LoHie F. (Mitchell.) 


April 


20, " 




Louis and Victoria (Mariofiote.) 


ivianonote. 


July 


2, " 


John Francis Daniels. 


William C. and Margaret A. (Wholler.) 


July 


31, " 


Elizabeth Cook. 


Isaac B. and Delia (Casey.) 


Aug. 


7, " 


Leonard Augusta Rooney. 


John W. and Mary C. (Shelby.) 


Aug. 


16, " 


Alvord Newton MacRac. 


Isaac N. and Erne (Lowden.) 


Aug. 


17, " 


Joseph Catonas. 


Nicholas and Caroline (Monica.) 


Aug. 


23, " 


Helen Farrar. 


Herbert G. and Edith (Biggs.) 


Sept. 


9, " 


Margaret Christina Hakey. 


Archibald and Mary (Griffiths.) 


Sept. 


12, " 


Fannie Pearl Mason. 


Perley J. and Fannie E. (Moore.) 


Sept. 


30, " 


Clarence Carrol Frost. 


Clarence G. and Martha E. (Byam.) 


Oct. 


25, " 


Louise Herman. 


Edwards W. and Gladys DeG. (Field.) 


Oct. 


29. " 


Ralph Norman Harris. 


William and Ida (Tyler.) 


Nov. 


7. " 


Amos Rogers Little, Jr. 


Amos R. and Edna (Hilburu.) 


Dec. 


23. " 


Paolina Faieta. 


Philip and Maria (DeChenga.) 


Dec. 


25, " 


Charles Arzamarski. 


Charles V. and Katharine I. (Cronin.) 



46 



Marriages Registered. 



Date of Marriage. 


Names. 


Residence. 


Jan. 


23, 1916. 


{ 


James Callan. 
Norah Springett. 


Lincoln. 

Lincoln. 


Feb. 


2, " 


1 


Ralph James Hutchinson. 
Mrs. Katharine Farwell. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


June 


7, " 


{ 


Michael Joseph Boyce. 
Frances Elizabeth Hagerty. 


Lincoln. 
Concord. 


July 


31, " 


{ 


Charles E. Woodhull. 
Mrs. Ida Minnie Cate. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


Aug. 


21, " 


{ 


Grover Francis Powers. 
Ida Beatrice Farnsworth. 


Baltimore, Md. 
Lincoln. 


Aug. 


27, " 


{ 


Sabatino di Meo. 
Maria Gianfelicio. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


Sept. 


3, " 


{ 


John Vincent McNeish. 
Mary Gertrude Cronin. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


Oct. 


4 " 


{ 


John Joseph Quinn. 
Emma Elizabeth Fuller. 


Cambridge. 
Lincoln. 



47 



Deaths Registered. 



Date of Death. 


Name. 


Y. 


Age. 
M. 


D. 


Jan. 


14, 1916 


Marion Jenkins. 


25 


3 


2 


Feb. 


14, " 


Cyrus G. Smith. 


81 


1 


15 


Mar. 


2, " 


Frederick Augustus Hayden. 


82 


3 


18 


April 


6, " 


Deborah Jane Spaulding Darling. 


71 


— 


3 


May 


6, " 


Thomas Coan. 


70 


— 


— 


May 


22, " 


Charles Grosklaus. 


55 


— 


— 


May 


25, " 


Martin F. Fisher. 


46 


6 


29 


June 


2, " 


Lillian Bell Burnbam Johnson. 


45 


5 


24 


June 


18, " 


George Darling. 


56 


— 


— 


July 


16, " 


Sarah Caroline Smith Pierce. 


88 


1 


10 


Oct. 


6, '* 


Marjorie Shaw. 


24 


3 


12 


Oct. 


14, " 


Susan Adeline Giles Farrar. 


66 


6 


2 


Dec. 


4, " 


George A. Mead. 


60 


6 






48 



EXTRACT FROM THE REVISED LAWS Chap. 29 
AS AMENDED BY CHAP. 280, ACTS OF 1912 

Sect. 1. Physicians and midwives shall, within forty- 
eight hours after the birth of every child in cases of 
which they were in charge, mail or deliver to the clerk 
or registrar of the city or town in which the birth oc- 
curred a notice stating the date and place of the birth, 
giving the street number, if any, the number of the 
ward in a city and the family name. Failure to mail or 
deliver the said notice shall be punished by a fine not 
exceeding twenty-five dollars for each offence. The 
notice required by this Section need not be given if the 
notice required by the following Section is given within 
forty-eight hours after the birth occurs. 

Sect. 6. Parents, within forty days after the birth of a 
child, and every householder, within forty days after the 
birth of a child in his house, shall cause notice thereof to 
be given to the clerk of the City or Town, in which such 
child is born. 

Sect. 8. A parent, keeper, superintendent or other 
person who is required by Section 6 to give or cause to be 
given notice of a birth or death, who neglects so to do for 
ten days after the time limited therefor, shall forfeit not 
more than five dollars for such offence. 



49 



DOGS LICENSED IN 1916 

There have been 114 Dog Licenses as follows: 99 
Males, 11 Females, 3 Spayed Females, 2 Kennels, for 
which the sum of S345.00 has been paid to the County 
Treasurer. 

There have been thirteen licenses issued since Novem- 
ber 16, 1916, and these will be included in the return 
made to the County Treasurer in June. 

There have been 45 Resident Hunters' Licenses issued, 
for which $38.25 has been paid to the Commissioners on 
Fisheries and Game. 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



50 



REPORT OF THE SELECTMEN 



The Selectmen present the following report for the 
fiscal year, ending December 31, 1916. 

The Board was organized by the choice of Charles S. 
Smith, Chairman, and R. D. Donaldson, Secretary. 

The following table gives the appropriations made by 
the Town during the year 1916, and the appropriations 
recommended by the Board to be made at the next 
Annual Meeting: — 



For Schools, 

Transportation for 

Children, 
Support of Poor, 
Highways and Bridges, 
Library — The Dog Tax 

and Interest, 
Cemeteries, 
Board of Health, 
Tree Warden, 
Suppression of Gypsy and 

Brown Tail Moths, 
Miscellaneous Expenses 
Hydrant and other Water 

Service, 
Waltham Hospital, Free 

Bed, 



Appropriations 
for 191(5 


The Selectmen 
recommend the 
following appro- 
priations for the 
ensuing year 


$12,500.00 


$11,500.00 




1,000.00 


500.00 


500.00 


12,000.00 


12,000.00 


500.00 


500.00 


500.00 


500.00 


500.00 


500.00 


200.00 


200.00 


400.00 


500.00 


2,100.00 


2,000.00 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


2,400.00 


2,400.00 


250.00 


250.00 



51 



Street Lamps, $1 ,800 . 00 $1 ,800 . 00 

Fire Department, 2,500. 00 100. 00 

Payment Schoolhouse 

Bonds, 3,000.00 3,000.00 

Interest Schoolhouse 

Bonds, 1,080.00 360.00 

Payment of Water Bonds 

(to be taken from 

Water Works Income) 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Water Works Sinking 

Fund (to be taken from 

Water Works Income) 1,500.00 1,500.00 

Voted, That the sum of 

$15,000 be appropriated 

from available funds in 

the treasury to retire 

the Schoolhouse Bonds 

and that the Sinking 

Fund Commissioners be 

a committee to purchase 

the same, and when any 

bonds are purchased, 

that the same be turned 

over to the Town Treas- 
urer to be cancelled. 15,000.00 
Voted, That the sum of 

$4,500.00 be appropri- 
ated for the current ex- 
penses of the Water 

Works, not including 

any appropriations for a 

new pump, and that 

the said sum of $4,500 

be taken from current 

Water Works receipts. 4,500.00 



52 



Appointments 

The following appointments have been made during 
the year: 

Sealer of Weights and Measures, Matthew H. Doherty. 

Weighers of Coal, Hay, Grain and other Commodities, 
Roger Sherman, William J. Bennett, S. Rodman Snelling. 

Inspector of Animals, Martin M. Welch. 

Special Police, William A. Harding, Winslow A. Eaton, 
Lorenzo E. Brooks, Herbert G. Farrar, John F. Farrar. 

Forest Warden, John J. Kelliher. 

Ballot Clerks and Tellers at the Annual State and 
Town Election, James W. Lennon, Thomas L. Giles, 
Herbert G. Farrar, Thomas J. Dee, Herman T. Wheeler. 

Janitor of Public Buildings and Caretaker of Public 
Grounds, Edward Bannon. 

Finances 

The bond issue on account of the new schoolhouse has 
been reduced by the annual appropriation and by special 
appropriations made for the purchase of schoolhouse 
bonds to $24,000. 

An appropriation of $15,000. 00 made from the surplus 
money in the treasury last year, has been paid to the 
Commissioners by the Town Treasurer, with which to 
purchase additional schoolhouse bonds, which will be 
done as soon as the bonds can be purchased at a reason- 
able price. In the meantime the money is on interest 
at 3%. 

Thus, there will remain only $9,000.00 of the school- 
house bonds to be liquidated. 

Exclusive of the money in the hands of the Town 
Treasurer on account of the Water Works Department, 
there is a balance of $2,005.46, and uncollected taxes 
of $3,651 . 21, or a total available balance in the treasury, 
exclusive of Water Works balance, of $5,655. 67. 



53 



The indebtedness on account of the Water Works is as 
reported by the Treasurer in connection with the Report 
of the Water Commissioners. The net debt on account 
of the Water Works at the present time approximates 
$50,000.00. 

Support of Poor 

No money has been expended during the year for the 
Support of Poor, except money which has been paid for 
Mothers' Aid, under a special act of the Legislature, and 
for which the Town has been reimbursed in a substantial 
sum. 

Fire Department 

The Fire Department has been conducted during the 
year as heretofore. For a more detailed report, reference 
is made to the Report of the Fire Engineer. 

Tree Warden 

Report of the Tree Warden gives a full account of the 
work his department has accomplished during the year, 
with recommendations for the future. 

Silent Poor Fund 

The Silent Poor Fund has not been drawn on during 
the year. 

Highways 

The highways during the year have been under the 
charge of the same Superintendent as in former years, 
Mr. William H. Sherman, and reference is made to his 
report for further information. 

At the last Annual Meeting, the Town voted certain 
amendments to the by-laws, and that the Selectmen be 



54 



a Committee to attend to the publication and promulga- 
tion of the same. These by-laws, as amended by the 
votes of the Town, were presented to the Attorney- 
General's office for revision some months since, and it 
appeared that some of the provisions conflicted with the 
present statutes. The Board expects to have a draft 
of by-laws, which the Attorney-General's office will 
approve, for presentation at the annual meeting. 

All of the Town's affairs have been running smoothly 
during the year, and we believe that all departments 
have worked conscientiously for the Town, and are 
generally in better condition than they have been at 
the close of any previous year. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 



Selectmen of Lincoln. 



00 



AUDITORS REPORT 

Following is an account of the money paid by the 
Treasurer on the Selectmen's approval. 

JAMES W. LENNON, 

Auditor. 



56 



SCHOOLS 



Payments 

C. S. Lyman, Services as Superintendent, $600 00 

Walter F. Brackett, Teaching, 275 00 

Hattie B. Heath, Teaching, 670 00 

Marion Crawford, Teaching, 390 00 

Helen M. Bowker, Teaching, 670 00 

Katharine Works, Teaching, 370 00 

Priscilla Ames, Teaching, 360 00 

Helen P. Jones, Teaching, 580 00 

Abbie P. Smith, Teaching, 153 00 

Bertha Wilson, Teaching, 132 00 

Margaret Woodward, Teaching, 216 00 

Helen C. Strong, Teaching, 260 00 

Letitia Ebbs, Teaching, 240 00 

Elaine Poole, Teaching, 180 00 

Rosa Bowker, Teaching, 4 00 

Ruth Shepard, Teaching, 2 00 

Frances Cutler, Teaching, 2 00 
John F. Farrar & Son, Driving School Barge, 616 00 

Hermon T. Wheeler, Driving School Barge, 764 35 

Thomas J. Dee, Driving School Barge, 589 00 

Doherty Garage, Carrying Children, 875 81 

Town of Concord, Tuition of Pupils, 2,704 91 

City of Waltham, Tuition of Pupils, 780 00 

City of Newton, Tuition of Pupil, 60 00 
Boston & Maine R.R., Student School Tickets, 793 55 

National Express Co., Express, 4 08 

H. A. Wood, M.D., Professional Services, 200 00 



57 



Francis Bennett, Janitor of South School, 
William E. Chute, Janitor of South School, 
Edward Bannon, Janitor of Lincoln School, 
Thomas J. AIcGaun, Repairs on Barge, 
John A. Burgess, Repairs on Barge, 
John M. Macomber, Repairs on Barge, 
William Bulger, Painting Barge, 
Waltham Nursing Association, Nurse, 
F. E. Cousins & Co., Removing Ashes, 
Roger Sherman, Removing Ashes, 
F. E. Cousins & Co., Coal, 
Waltham Coal Co., Coal, 
Edward R. Farrar, 1 Cord of Wood, 
Boston & Maine R.R., Freight, 
Lincoln Water Works, Water Service, 
E. Howard Clock Co., Repairs on Clock, 
Elizabeth W. Blodgett, Sewing Table, 
Leroy Basley, Electrical Work on Bell, 
Current Events, 40 Copies, 
Sarah W. Brooks, Cash paid J. Diamond, 
James Diamond, Transportation to Concord, 
John D. Fleming, Transportation to Concord, 
Isaac B. Cook, Transportation to Concord, 
John Redman Hartwell, Transportation to 

Concord, 
C. S. Lyman, Cash paid for Supplies, 
Frank Wright, Inspecting Boilers, 
Helen P. Jones, Car fares from Waltham, 
Isaac N. McRae, Labor and Supplies, 
Ames Plow Company, Supplies, 
Rexall Store, Supplies, 
Henry C. Doherty, Supplies, 
Darling & Rhodes, Supplies, 
H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 
Clifford B. Cobb Co., Supplies, 
South Lincoln Dairy Co., Supplies, 



$44 85 


110 


15 


500 


00 


1 


00 


8 


25 


5 


00 


85 00 


2 


27 


1 


50 


9 


60 


14 


02 


487 45 


7 


00 


1 


27 


105 


50 


6 80 


10 00 


3 


90 


8 00 


4 


15 


21 


65 


17 


50 


17 


50 


17 


50 


12 


10 


4 00 


37 


00 


56 


54 


7 


75 


4 40 


4 


40 


1 


20 


1 


05 


8 96 


5 


40 



58 



A. G. Spaulding & Bros., Supplies, 
James L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 
Ginn & Company, Supplies, 
Marion Crawford, Supplies, 
American Book Co., Supplies, 
A. R. MacLeod, Supplies, 
E. E. Babb Co., Supplies, 
Palmer Parker Co., Supplies, 
Benj. H. Sanborn Co., Supplies, 
Little Brown Co., Supplies, 
E. B. McLalan, Supplies, 
Bradford, Brown & Co., Supplies, 
West Disinfecting Co., Supplies, 
Bernard M. Sheriden, Supplies, 
Abbie P. Smith, Supplies, 
James T. Laird, Supplies, 
A. J. Wilkinson & Co., Supplies, 
Chandler & Barber Co., Supplies, 
Johnson Paper Co., Supplies, 
Kenny Bros. & Wolkins, Supplies, 
C. H. Moulton & Co., Supplies, 
Hopkinson & Holden, Supplies, 



Total, 
Appropriation, 

Balance, $366 48 



$33 37 


86 11 


2 24 


1 10 


3 20 


14 36 


166 89 


27 20 


75 


13 51 


34 50 


11 50 


14 07 


9 00 


5 20 


11 90 


1 85 


14 92 


8 00 


39 49 


6 00 


4 00 


$14,633 52 


15,000 00 



59 
HIGHWAYS 



Payments 

William H. Sherman, Superintendent of 

Streets, SI 

Timothy Ahearn, Labor, 

Martin J. Rooney, Labor, 

John W. Rooney, Sr., Labor, 

John W. Rooney, Jr., Labor, 

William H. Ryan, Labor, 

Joseph Mahan, Labor, 

Patrick Craven, Labor, 

Jerry Moynihan, Labor, 

Francis Bennett, Labor, 

Charles Cunnert, Labor, 

Michael Connors, Labor, 

James Lahey, Labor, 

Charles P. Farnsworth,Care of Town Horses, 

F. E. Cousins & Co., Grain, 

B. W. Brown, Grain, 

John A. Burgess, Shoeing and Repair Work, 

Daniel McAskill, Shoeing and Repair Work, 

John Macomber, Repair Work, 

National Express Co., Express, 

Boston & Maine R.R., Freight, 

Waltham Coal Co., Coal, 

Marcy Coal Co., Coal, 

Daniel E. Sherman, Hay, 

H. L. Alderman, M.D., Professional Services, 

Joseph S. Hart, M.D., Rent of Barn, $125, 
Credit, $18.25, 

Lincoln Water Works, Water Service, 

Charles Skoglund, Inspecting Boiler at Crusher, 



,252 31 


754 


75 


607 


25 


546 


50 


78 


75 


549 


75 


626 


00 


396 


25 


11 


25 


9 


00 


1 


25 


3 


25 


5 


75 


267 


50 


12 


90 


978 


60 


189 


05 


49 


00 


43 


50 


2 88 


254 


09 


48 


58 


15 


55 


748 35 


5 


00 


106 


75 


22 


00 


5 


00 



60 

Town of Wayland, Use of Steam Roller, $60 00 

Frank H. Cunningham, Labor of Men, 151 50 

Barrett Mfg. Co., Tarvia, 1,790 56 

John Baker, Jr., Road Oil, 857 31 

Mass. Broken Stone Co., Crushed Stone, 707 93 

Lexington Lumber Co., Lumber, 53 76 
John F. Farrar & Son, Labor on Highway, 13 50 

Daniel E. Sherman, Labor on Highway, 77 25 

Andrew J. Dougherty, Snow Work, 101 85 

George W. Browning, Snow Work, 22 00 

Daniel Holman, Snow Work, 4 50 

George E. Cunningham, Snow Work, 105 00 

Burt Pearson, Snow Work, 18 00 

Daniel E. Sherman, Snow Work, 12 00 

John F. Farrar & Son, Snow Work, 62 25 

Elmer A. Bean, Snow Work, 25 25 

Hermon T. Wheeler, Snow Work, 14 50 

Thomas Barnes, Snow Work, 15 00 

Ralph Butcher, Snow Work, 33 75 

Nicholas Cotona, Snow Work, 3 38 

Frank Strangio, Snow Work, 9 00 

George Hills, Snow Work, 3 38 

D. Dominick, Snow Work, 22 50 

Eugene H. Moore, Snow Work, 4 15 

Mrs. Mary A. Sherman, Gravel, 28 65 

Mrs. Annie Morrissey, Gravel, 13 50 

Charles V. Sargent, Gravel, 15 00 

Thomas A. Calkins, Gravel, 6 65 

Herbert W. Farrar, Gravel and Sand, 223 25 

Eagle Oil and Supply Co., Supplies, 23 45 

Ames Plow Company, Supplies, 48 84 

Walworth Mfg. Co., Supplies, 6 60 

Isaac N. McRae, Supplies, 30 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 53 37 

Byers & Smith, Supplies, 16 89 

Benj. W. Pike, Supplies, 28 80 



61 



Good Roads Machine Co., Supplies, 

H. W. Johns, Manville Co., Supplies, 

John A. Higgins, Supplies, 

Peter Perry, Supplies, 

Edison Mfg. Co., Supplies, 

Kenny Mfg. Co., Supplies, 

New England Metal Culvert Co., Supplies, 

Estella M. Brooks, Rent of Land for Crusher, 

1916, 
Max Tankell, Stone, 
Nicholas Cotona, Stone, 
Ralph Butcher, Stone, 
D. Dominick, Stone, 
Charles R. Butcher, Stone, 
John Fleming, Stone, 
Michael Connors, Stone, 
L. E. Brooks, Stone, 
Horace G. Paine, Stone, 
Robert D. Donaldson, Labor, 

Total, 
Appropriation, 

Over Expenditure, 



$71 


41 


2 


75 


4 


65 


21 


40 


2 


66 


4 50 


71 


82 


25 


00 


5 


20 


10 40 


26 80 


13 


20 


50 


10 


9 00 


35 


15 


30 


90 


7 


60 


120 


78 


$12,737 85 


12,000 


00 



$737 85 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Payments 

Edward Bannon, Janitorship of Public 

Buildings and Grounds, $599 92 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Service, 36 87 

Edison Electric Co., Service of Light — Bemis 

Hall, 81 90 



62 



Arthur Chapin, Town Clerk— Balance of 1915, $30 00 
Arthur Chapin, Town Clerk and Registrar, 

1916, 
National Express Co., Express, 
John F. Farrar, Special Police, 1915, 
John F. Farrar, Special Police, 1916, 
P. B. Murphy, Printing, 
George E. Crosby Co., Printing, 
Waltham Publishing Co., Printing, 
Martin M. Welch, Inspecting Cattle and 

Fumigating, 
George L. Chapin, Insurance, 
John J. Kelliher, Services as Constable, 1915, 
John J. Kelliher, Collecting Dog Tax, 
John J. Kelliher, Posting Warrants, 
John J. Kelliher, Services, July 4th, 
John J. Kelliher, Making Arrests and Carfares, 
Joseph S. Hart, M.D., Returning Births, 
J. V. Tilton, M.D., Returning Birth, 
Henry J. Walcott, M.D., Returning Births, 
George West-gate Mills, M.D., Returning Birth, 
Mass. Bonding Co., Treasurer's Bond, 
George Cunningham, Services as Constable, 

1915, 45 00 

Thomas J. Dee, Services at Primaries and 

Elections, 13 50 

Thomas L. Giles, Services at Primaries and 

Elections, 15 50 

A. J. Dougherty, Jr., Services at Primaries 

and Elections, 5 00 

Charles Clark, Services at Primaries and 

Elections, '10 00 

Herbert G. Farrar, Services at Primaries and 

Elections, 10 50 

James W. Lennon, Services at Primaries and 

Elections, 3 50 



120 00 


1 


99 


15 00 


10 


00 


3 


20 


452 


60 


3 


25 


169 


75 


78 


25 


25 


00 


25 


00 


6 


00 


3 


00 


10 


37 


1 


00 




25 




50 




25 


150 


00 



$5 00 


2 00 


4 41 


15 00 


16 00 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


14 92 


3 50 


5 00 



63 



John J. Kelliher, Services at Election, 
Charles S. Wheeler, Certification of Note, 
John J. Kelliher, Court Expenses, 
W. M. Tyler, M.D., Medical Attendance 

to D. Purslow, 
Mrs. C. V. Sargent, Care of D. Purslow, 
John F. Farrar, Storing Hose Wagon, 1915, 
John F. Farrar, Storing Hose Wagon, 1916, 
Doherty Garage, Auto hire, Police, 
Doherty Garage, Auto hire, Selectmen, 
Doherty Garage, Labor on Fire Hose, 
William C. Pierce, Service of Auto Truck, 
E. W. Prescott, Legal Services furnished 

Assessors, 16 50 

Story Scenic Co., Fire Proofing Stage Fix- 
tures, 30 00 
George M. Bowker, Placing Marks on Graves 

of Veterans, 
C. S. Wheeler, Abatement of Taxes, 
C. S. Wheeler, Cash paid for Telephone, 
C. S. Wheeler, Treasurer and Postage, 
C. S. Wheeler, Insurance, 
C. S. Wheeler, Services as Assessor, 1916, 
W. H. Sherman, Services as Assessor, 1916, 
William C. Pierce, Services as Assessor, 1916, 
William C. Pierce, Copying Books, 
Charles E. Clark, Assisting Constable, 
Roger Sherman, Rent of Land for Town 

Scales, to July, 1919, 
Charles Woodhull, Care of Piano, 
Highway Department, Teaming Coal, 
John F. Farrar, Services as Selectman, 

Overseer and Registrar, 195 00 

R. D. Donaldson, Services as Selectman, 

Overseer and Registrar, 195 00 



10 00 


437 


78 




40 


312 


42 


12 50 


50 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


35 


00 


2 


00 


25 


00 


7 


80 


75 


00 



$195 00 


1 


50 


12 


95 


10 


00 


20 


00 


221 


05 


390 


96 



64 



Charles S. Smith, Services as Selectman, 

Overseer and Registrar, 
Charles S. Smith, Cash paid for Book, 
Charles S. Smith, Expenses and Postage, 
L. E. Brooks, Services as Special Police, 1915, 
Matthew H. Doherty, Sealer of Weights and 

Measures, 1916, 
Robert D. Donaldson, Repairs on Town Hall, 
Waltham Coal Co., Coal, 
Thomas J. Dee, Care of Hose and Fighting 

Fires, 17 20 

F. E. Cousins & Co., Fighting Fires and 

Storing Wagon, 
Fred Bamforth, Fighting Fires, 
Isaac N. McRae, Labor on Fire Wagon and 

Hose, 
George E. Cunningham, Services at Election, 
John F. Farrar & Son, Labor on Station 

Road, 
Leroy Basley, Labor at. Town Hall, 
Isaac N. McRae, Labor at Town Hall, 
Thomas Groom & Co., Supplies, 
W. & L. E. Gurley, Supplies, 
James L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 
Carter Ink Co., Supplies, 
George A. Woodward, Supplies, 
A. W. Brownell, Supplies, 
U. S. Fireproofing Co., Supplies, 
W. C. Robus, Fighting Fires, 
George L. Chapin, Insurance on Lincoln School, 
James W. Lennon, Services as Auditor, 



64 80 


2 


40 


10 


60 


5 


00 


5 


15 


26 43 


6 


79 


7 


86 


4 


65 


2 


00 


1 


25 


17 


00 


2 


50 


4 


75 


2 


00 


75 


00 


125 


00 



Total, $4,759 17 

Appropriation, 5,000 00 

Balance, $240 83 



65 

MOTHS 

Payments 
John J. Kelliher, Superintendent of Moth 

Department, $843 00 

James Ryan, Labor, 603 38 

Fritz Cunnert, Labor, 497 50 

John Connair, Labor, 586 25 

Henry A. Butcher, Labor, 316 50 

Byron Lunt, Labor, 52 50 

Ashley Cousins, Labor, 21 38 

James Lahey, Labor, 11 25 

George Weale. Labor, 9 00 

William Burgess, Labor, 30 38 

John J. Kelliher, Services of Automobile, 112 00 

New England Telephone Co., Service, 16 61 

J. S. Hart, M.D., Medical Attendance, 2 00 

Boston & Maine R.R., Freight, § 1 95 

National Express Co., Express, 1 42 

F. E. Cousins & Co., Teaming, 1 00 

Henry A. Butcher, Labor of Horse, 43 50 

Standard Oil Co., Gasoline, 46 50 

Doherty Garage, Gasoline, 1 96 

Doherty Garage, Teaming Freight, 5 25 

Robert D. Donaldson, Filing Saws, 70 

New York & Boston Burlap Co., Supplies, 1 89 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 14 45 

James L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 45 

John A. Burgess, Repairs, 1 75 

Daniel McAskill, Repairs, 6 25 

Isaac N. MacRae, Labor on Sprayer, 5 76 

Andrew J. Dougherty, Labor of Horses, 161 50 

M. L. Snelling, Labor of Horses, 167 38 

Highway Department, Storing Sprayer, 25 00 

Total, $3,588 46 

Appropriation, 2,100 00 

Over Expenditure, $1,488 46 



66 
NEW SCHOOLHOUSE BONDS 



Payments 
First National Bank, Bonds Due Jan. 1, $3,000 00 



MOTHERS' AID 



Payments 

Mrs. Agnes Gilbert, Mothers' Aid, 1916, $165 00 

Doherty's Garage, Auto Hire, 4 50 



Total, $169 50 

Appropriation, 500 00 



Balance, $330 50 



PAYMENT BORROWED MONEY 



Payment 

First National Bank, Payment Borrowed 

Money, $25,000 00 



WALTHAM HOSPITAL 



Payment 
Waltham Hospital, Appropriation, $250 00 



67 
HYDRANTS AND OTHER WATER SERVICE 



Payments 



Water Commissioners, 122 Hydrants at $15, $1,830 00 
Water Commissioners, Water Service, Town 

Hall, 50 00 

Water Commissioners, Watering Troughs, 572 81 



Total, $2,452 81 

Appropriation, 2,400 00 



Over Expenditure, $52 81 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Payments 



Carter, Carter & Meigs, Supplies, $3 63 

Doherty Garage, Auto Hire, 1 00 
Martin M. Welch, Fumigating and Posting 

Cards, 45 12 

Martin M. Welch, Inspecting Meats, 19 50 



Total, $69 25 

Appropriation, 200 00 



Balance, $130 75 



68 



INTEREST 



Payment 



First National Bank, Discount on Note of 

$25,000, $370 10 

Appropriation, 500 00 



Balance, $129 90 



INTEREST ON BONDS NEW SCHOOLHOUSE 



Payments 



First National Bank, Coupons due Jan. 1, $680 00 

First National Bank, Coupons due July 1, 480 00 



Total, $1,160 00 

Appropriation, 1,080 00 



Over Expenditures $80 00 



69 
STREET LIGHTS 



Payments 



Edison Electric Co., Light for December, 1915, 
Edison Electric Co., Light for January, 1916, 
Edison Electric Co., Light for February, 
Edison Electric Co., Light for March, 
Edison Electric Co., Light for April, 
Edison Electric Co., Light for May, 
Edison Electric Co., Light for June and July, 
Edison Electric Co., Light for August, 
Edison Electric Co., Light for September, 
Edison Electric Co., Light for October, 
Edison Electric Co., Light for November, 



S146 93 


144 


96 


141 


04 


134 


90 


131 


90 


131 


92 


262 


11 


132 


44 


135 


56 


139 


95 


141 


59 



Total, $1,643 30 

Appropriation, 1,800 00 

Balance. $156 70 



LINCOLN LIBRARY 



Payments 



John F. Farrar, Treasurer, Dog Tax returned, $348 30 
John F. Farrar, Treasurer, Appropriation, 500 00 

Total, $848 30 



70 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATION FOR PAYMENT OF 
SCHOOLHOUSE BONDS 



Payment 



Sinking Fund Commissioners, Special 

Payment, $15,000 00 



CEMETERY 



Payments 

Roger Sherman, Labor with men and horses, $260 36 

Fritz Cunnert, Labor, 

Isaac McRae, Labor, 

Carl Nelson, Labor, 

West St. Nursery Co., Shade Trees, 

George A. Woodward, 1 pair Shears, 

Water Commissioners, Water, 

Total, 
Appropriation, 

Balance, $121 54 



6 00 


9 20 


7 50 


1 65 


20 00 


$378 46 


500 00 



71 
FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Payments 
American La France Fire Engine Co., Fire 

Truck, $2,500 00 

Salary of 34 Firemen, 68 00 



Total, 


$2,568 00 


Appropriation, 


2,500 00 


Over Expenditure, 


$68 00 


RECAPITULATION 




Payments 




Schools, 


$14,633 52 


Highways, 


12,737 85 


Water, 


13,247 42 


Borrowed Money, 


25,000 00 


Miscellaneous, 


4,759 17 


Special Appropriation of Schoolhouse Bonds 


, 15,000 00 


Schoolhouse Bonds, 


3,000 00 


Interest on Schoolhouse Bonds, 


1,160 00 


Hydrants and other Water Service, 


2,452 81 


Moth Department, 


3,588 46 


Street Lights, 


1,643 30 


Library, 


848 30 


Cemetery, 


378 46 


Waltham Hospital, 


250 00 


Board of Health, 


69 25 


Fire Department, 


2,568 00 


Mothers' Aid, 


169 50 


Interest, 


370 10 


Total, 


$101,876 14 



72 



WATER 



Payments 

James T. Laird, Services as Superintendent and 

Engineer, $1,166 00 

James T. Laird, Collecting Water Rates, 1915, 175 00 
James T. Laird, Use of Auto Truck, 42 44 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Telephone Service, 41 06 

Boston & Maine R.R., Freight, 10 14 

National Express Co., Express, 13 89 

Lincoln Post Office, Rent of Box, 75 

William Johnson, Professional Services, 301 00 

William C. Pierce, Rent of Land, 1916, 5 00 

Sinking Fund Commissioners, Sinking Fund, 1,500 00 
William " H. Sherman, Services as Water 

Commissioner, 75 00 

Joseph S. Hart, M.D., Services as Water 

Commissioner, 
George L. Chapin, Insurance, 
Whitman, Surveying, etc., 
Waltham Coat Co., Coat, 
Frank H. Cunningham, Labor as Fireman, 
Frank H. Cunningham, Labor with Men, 
John F. Farrar & Son, Labor with Men and 

Horses, 
Doherty Garage, Delivering Freight, 
Rumsey Pump Co., New Pump, etc., 
Edison Electric Co., Power for Lighting and 

Pumping, 
Edison Electric Co., Electrical Fan, 



75 


00 


50 00 


36 


09 


709 


78 


167 07 


363 


68 


36 


75 


23 


62 


2,350 32 


691 


99 


12 


00 



73 

Roderick B. Laird, Making out Water Bills, $7 00 

Andrew J. Dougherty, Jr., Reading Water 

Meters, 
Lewis A. Laird, Clerk of Water Board, 
George E. Crosby, Printing, 
Hartford St. Pump Boiler Inspection and 

Insurance Co., Insurance, 
Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 
Builders Iron Foundry, Supplies, 
Chadwick Boston Lead Co., Supplies, 
Chapman Valve Co., Supplies, 
Eagle Oil & Supply Co., Supplies, 
Walworth Mfg. Co., Supplies, 
Damon & Glenn, Supplies, 
A. J. Wilkinson & Co., Supplies, 
Union Water Meter Co., Supplies, 
National Meter Co., Supplies, 
Wadsworth Howland Co., Supplies, 
John A. Higgins, Supplies, 
International Steam Pump Co., Supplies, 
L. E. Bazley, Labor and Supplies, 
W. A. & T. B. McLeod, Labor on Old Pump, 
Louis A. Laird, Labor, 
M. J. Boyce, Labor, 

George E. Winslow, Labor and Supplies, 
William A. Stevens, Labor, 
Charles E. Clark, Labor, 
Robert D. Donaldson, Labor and Supplies, 
Davis & Farnum, Labor. 
Thomas J. Dee, Labor, 
William H. Ryan, Labor, 
Isaac N. McRae, Labor and Supplies, 
Robert B. Hunter, Labor, 
Daniel McAskill, Repairs on Tools, 
William C. Rob us, Electrical Work, 
Town Treasurer, Coupons due 1915, 



54 00 


25 


00 


31 


25 


32 


80 


15 


08 


32 


46 


7 


02 


38 


21 


104 84 


76 


33 


1 


48 




80 


33 


25 


29 61 


6 


65 


2 


70 


22 


80 


203 


67 


61 


80 


44 50 


2 


00 


26 


40 


1 


30 


22 


85 


283 


48 


4 


00 


3 


50 


51 


00 


91 


35 


2 00 


9 


40 


17 31 


40 00 



74 



Town Treasurer, Coupons due Mar. 1, 1916, $817 50 

First Nat'l Bank, Coupons due Sept. 1, 817 50 

First Nat'l Bank, Coupons due May 1, 

First Nat'l Bank, Coupons due June 1, 

First Nat'l Bank, Coupons due Nov. 1, 

First Nat'l Bank, Coupons due Dec. 1, 

First Nat'l Bank, Two $500 Bonds, 



Total, 



87 50 


602 50 


87 50 


602 50 


1,000 00 


$13,247 42 



75 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



February 1, 1917. 



To the Board of Health :- 



I herewith submit the following report for year 
ending December 31, 1916: — 



Number of herds of cows 










81 


Number of milch cows . 










520 


Number of dry cows 










112 


Number of young stock . 










101 


Number of bulls 










26 


Number of pigs 










880 


Number of sheep 










46 


Number of goats 













Number of cows quarantined 








11 


Number of cows taken for tuberculosis 




11 


Number of cows quarantined and released 





Number of horses quarantine 


d 












MARTIN M. WELCH, 

Inspector of Animals. 



76 



REPORT OF ANIMALS SLAUGHTERED. 

February 1, 1917. 
To the Board of Health: — 

I herewith submit the following report of animals 
slaughtered for year ending December 31, 1916: — 

Pigs 568 

Calves 66 

Cattle 30 

Pigs condemned 8 

Calves condemned 2 

Cattle condemned 

MARTIN M. WELCH, 

Member of the Board of Health. 



77 

REPORT OF FIRE ENGINEERS 

To the Board of Selectmen: — 

The Board of Fire Engineers herewith submit their 
ninth annual report, ending December 31, 1916. 

Force 
Thirty-three men belong to the department : one chief, 
six engineers and twenty-six call men. There are three 
organized companies. 

Apparatus 
The apparatus belonging to the Department is as 
follows : — Three wagons, one reel, one combination truck, 
twenty-five extinguishers, three ladders, one harness, hose, 
axes and plaster hooks. 

Location of Apparatus 
No. 1. Hose house, old schoolhouse, Lincoln Centre. 
No. 2. Combination truck at Doherty's garage, So. 

Lincoln. 
No. 3. Hose house, John Dee farm, Virginia Road, 
North Lincoln. 

Fires 
One house and several chimney fires at a loss of about 
$4,000. 

A La France truck has been purchased by the com- 
mittee appointed at the annual town meeting for the sum 
appropriated, $2,500. 

We recommend that the apparatus not in use be 
disposed of by the Town. 

ISAAC N. MACRAE, Chief, 

THOMAS DEE, 

HERBERT FARRAR, 

H. S. COUSINS, 

J. J. KELLIHER, 

ANDREW DOUGHERTY, 

M. H. DOHERTY. Engineers. 



78 
REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 

To the Board of Selectmen: — 

I herewith submit the following report for the year 
ending December 31, 1916: — 

Last January we had a warm spell of weather which 
caused the roads to become soft and some of them were 
badly rutted, and had to be filled with crushed stone; 
then we had about two months of snow-storms which 
caused a lot of snow work, breaking out roads and making 
them passable. Some roads had to be shoveled out 
almost every day for a week or more, which caused a 
large expense. About the last of March the snow went 
away and some of the roads were so badly cut up by 
automobiles that they were almost impassable. I 
think on the whole this year has been the hardest one 
that I have seen to maintain the roads and keep them in 
good condition, therefore I have not built as much new 
road this year as in years previous. I have used 1,600 
loads of sand and gravel for covering tarvia and building 
gravel roads in different parts of the town, and about 
thirty carloads of crushed stone bought from the 
Massachusetts Broken Stone Company, besides what 
stone we had at the town crusher. The most of this 
stone was used to fill ruts and holes in the roadway. 
I have also used 26,000 gallons tarvia and 15,000 gallons 
of oil for dust laying, etc. 

The following payments have been made during the 
year : — 

Hay, grain, straw, etc., approximately, $1,600 00 

Stone, gravel and sand, " 1,240 00 

Tarvia and oil, " 2,615 00 

Supplies, etc., " 655 00 



79 



Rent, approximately ■ $150 00 

Freight and express, 250 00 

Steam roller, " 60 00 

Shoeing and repairs, 240 00 

Superintendent's salary, labor, snow work, etc., 5,740 00 

Total, $12,550 00 

The sum-total of which has been paid into the 
Town Treasury, and what is still due 
for labor, material, etc., is approximately, $450 00 



Amount expended on highways for the year 

is approximately, $12,100 00 

The following is a list of places where the money has 
been expended : — 

Building Gravel Roads: 

Tower Road, 500 Feet. 

Higginson Road, 850 

Adams Road, 670 

South Great Road, 700 

Farrar Road, 400 

Flint Road, 800 

Page Road, 550 

Building Crushed Stone Roads: 

Codman Road, 800 Feet. 

Turn Pike Road, 700 " 

Town Hill Road, 660 " 

Tarvia Macadam Road 

Concord Road, 700 feet, 15 feet wide 

The Neville Road, the Sandy Pond Road and the 

Sherman Road needed an unusual amount of stone to 

fill the ruts, and had to be covered with gravel. We have 

scraped most of the roads in town, cleaned out the 



80 



gutters, put in several culverts where the roads held the 
water back, also put in a new culvert near Mr. Brad- 
street's. We have about five hundred tons of crushed 
stone to team to different parts of the town, for filling 
ruts, etc., in the spring. 

The Highway Department is in about the same condi- 
tion as last year. 

I have recommended the sum of $12,000 each year, and 
I still think it will take that sum to keep the roads in as 
good condition as they are now. As the price of all 
kinds of material and labor have advanced this year, 
I shall recommend the sum of $12,000 for the highways 
this year. 

The guide boards are all in good condition. 
Yours respectfully, 
WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



81 



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dreo 

>f Boston foi tuition of children 
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in anticipation of taxes . 
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ambridgti Assessments 


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82 



Report of the Commissioners of Sinking 
and Trust Funds 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS. 

In Account with 
TOWN OF LINCOLN 



1916. Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance 

Coupons, Town of Lincoln 3^s 
Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s, 1917 
Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s (Serial) 
Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s, 1936 
Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4s. 
$500 Town of Lincoln, Serial 4s, due 
Cash, C. S. Wheeler, Treasurer 
Interest on deposit .... 



$ 51.01 
105.00 

80.00 
160.00 
560.00 
160.00 
500.00 
1,500.00 

24.88 
$3,140.89 



1916. 
Dec. 



Cr. 



31. Balance 



$3,140.89 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

$4,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4s, 1929. 
$3,500 Town of Lincoln 4s, Serial Bonds, due 1912 to 1923. 
$14,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due September, 1936. 
$3,000 Town of Lincoln 3*8, due September, 1932. 
$2,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due June, 1917. 



Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



83 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 
In Account with 
FUND FOR EXTRA SCHOOLHOUSE BONDS 

1916 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $707.91 

Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s . . . 140.00 

Interest on deposit 7 . 99 

$855.90 



1916. Cr. 

May 31. Balance paid C. S. Wheeler, Treasurer . . $855.90 



1916. 

May 31. The following securities were delivered to C. S. Wheeler, 
Treasurer : 

$2,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1924. 
$2,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1925. 
$2,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1926. 
$1,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1927. 

The above account is now closed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



84 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 
In Account with 

FUND FOR PURCHASE OF SCHOOLHOUSE 
BONDS 

1916. Dr. 

Dec. 30. Cash received from C. S. Wheeler, Treasurer . $15,000.00 



1916. Cr. 

Dec. 31. Cash on deposit . . . . . . . . . $15,000.00 



Respectfully submitted, 

C LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



85 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

GEORGE G. TARBELL LEGACY TO THE 
LINCOLN LIBRARY. 



1916. 
Jan. 



D?. 



1916. 
Dec. 



Balance 

Dividends, West End St. Railway common 
Dividends, American Tel. & Tel. Co. . 
Dividends, West End St. Railway pfd. 
Dividends, Boston & Lowell R. R. Co. 
Coupons, United Fruit 4$8, 1923 . 
American Tel. & Tel. Co., 4 rights 
Interest on deposit . . . 



Cr. 
31. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library 
Balance on deposit, principal account . 



$29.60 

3.50 

32.00 

52.00 

64.00 

22.50 

7.87 

3.24 

$214.71 



$185.11 

29.60 

$214.71 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

8 shares Boston & Lowell Railroad Co. 
13 shares West End Street Railway Co., preferred. 
8 shares New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 
4 shares American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
1 share West End Street Railway Co. common. 
$500 United Fruit Co. 4£s ; 1923. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



86 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

GEORGE RUSSELL LEGACY TO THE LINCOLN 

LIBRARY 



1916. 




Dr. 




Jan. 


1. 


Balance ........ 

Dividends, Fitchburg Railroad Co. 
Interest 


$33.02 

35.00 

1.09 






Cr. 


$69.11 


1916. 




Dec. 


31. 


Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library 
Balance on deposit, principal account . 


$36.09 
33.02 

$69.11 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

7 shares Fitchburg Railroad Co., preferred. 

2 shares New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



87 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

JULIA A. BEMIS FUND FOR BENEFIT OF 
LINCOLN LIBRARY 



1916. 




Dr. 




Jan. 


1. 


Balance 


$7.25 






Dividends, West End St. Railway common 


7.00 






Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 


40.00 






Interest 


.47 






Cr. 


$54.72 


1916. 




Dec. 


31, 


Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library- 


$47.47 






Balance on deposit, principal account . 


7.25 
$54.72 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4s, due 1929. 
2 shares "West End Street Railway Co., common. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



88 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

JOHN^H. PIERCE LEGACY TO THE LINCOLN 

LIBRARY 



1916. 


Dr. 




Jan. 


1 . Dividend, West End St. Railway, common 
Coupon, General Gas & Electric Co. 6s . 
General Gas and Electric Co. 6s, due . 
Interest 


$3.50 

30.00 

1,000.00 

6.37 

$1,039.87 


1916. 


Cr. 




Dec. 


31. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library 
$1,000 American Tel. & Tel. Co. 5s . 
Balance, principal account 


$39.87 

981.67 

18.33 

$1,039.87 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

1 share West End Street Railway Co., common. 
$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 5s, 1946. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



89 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR LINCOLN 

LIBRARY 



1916. 




Dr. 




Jan. 


1. 


Balance 

Dividends, West End St. Railway, common . 
Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 
Interest 


$89.62 

17.50 

80.00 

3.15 






Cr. 


$190.27 


1916. 




Dec. 


31. 


Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library 
Balance on deposit, principal account . 


100.65 

89.62 

$190.27 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

$2,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4s, due 1929. 
5 shares West End Street Railway Co., common. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



90 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR SILENT 

POOR. 

1916. Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $390.71 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4s . . 80.00 

Interest 13.31 

$484.02 



1916. Cr. 

May 13. Cash, Selectmen's order $25.00 

Dec. 29. Balance on deposit, income account . . 343.80 

Balance on deposit, principal account . . 115.22 

484.02 

The Fund is invested as follows: 

$2,000 American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4s, due 1929. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



91 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR TOWN 
HEARSE. 

1916. Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $147.00 

Dividend, Pennsylvania Railroad Co. . 33 . 00 

Interest on deposit 4 . 89 

~~$184~89 

1916. Cr. 

Dec. 31. Balance on deposit $184.89 

The Fund is invested as follows: 

11 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 

Respectfully submitted; 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



92 
THE BEMIS LECTURE FUND TRUSTEES 

In Account with 
THE BEMIS LECTURE FUND 



1916. 
Jan. 



1916. 




Jan. 


15. 




26. 


Feb. 


3. 




10. 




12. 


March 


1. 




2. 




14. 




16. 




29. 


April 


2. 


Oct. 


28. 


Nov. 


3. 




10. 




17. 




20. 



Dr. 

Balance 

Dividends, Pennsylvania Railroad. 

Boston & Providence R. R. 

Fitchburg Railroad preferred 

Old Colony R. R. . 

Boston & Albany R. R. 

American Tel. & Tel. Co. 

Boston & Lowell R. R. 

West End St. Ry. pfd . 
Coupons, New York Railways 4s 

Southern Railways 4s . 

New York Ry. Adj. 

American Tel. & Tel. Co., 4s 
Rights, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 
Sale, $3,000 Utah Company 6s 
Interest on deposit .... 



Cr. 
Famous Players Film Co. 

General Film Co 

L. J. Smith, Operator and expenses 
W. C. Robus, % March 18, 1915 . 
P. A. Carter, Postals and labor . 
W. F. Allen & Co., Postals and Printing 
P. A. Carter, Envelopes and Labor 
The Players Adelphi Concert Co. 
Doherty Garage, to March 1st. . 
The Symphony Players Club 
Powell Printing Co., Programs 
Byron W. Reed, Lecture 
Morris Hindus, Lecture . 
Doherty Garage, to April 1st. 
Chimes of Normandy Co. 
P. A. Carter, Envelopes and Labor 
Powell Printing Co., Programs 
Artists 1 Recital Concert . 
B. R. Baumgardt, Lecture . 



$453.06 

150.00 

100.00 

50.00 

70.00 

87.50 

480.00 

240.00 

40.00 

40.00 

120.00 

207.00 

40.00 

118.12 

3,110.68 

91.34 

S5,397. 70 



S25.00 

10.00 

24.60 

10.00 

2.31 

1.00 

2.88 

104.90 

21.00 

150.00 

8.50 

50.00 

50.00 

5.00 

150.00 

' 3.50 

9.50 

102.50 

101.80 



93 



Nov 22. W. F. Allen & Co., Postals and Printing 

28. Sir Edward Pears, Lecture 

Dec. 5. Doherty Garage, to Nov. 20th. . 

12. J. H. Balmer, Savage Africa . 

15. $1,000 American Tel. & Tel. Co., 5s, 1946 

16. 25 shares Great Northern Ry Co., preferred 
31. Balance on deposit .... 



$ 3.25 

150.00 

13.00 

125.00 

995.55 

2,931.25 

347.16 

•770 



The Fund of $30,000 is invested as follows: 
50 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 
30 " Boston & Lowell Railroad Co. 
10 " Boston & Providence Railroad Co. 
10 " Boston & Albany Railroad Co. 
10 " Fitchburg Railroad Co. 
10 " Old Colony Railroad Co. 
10 " West End Street Railway Co. pfd. 
10 " New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 
10 " Boston & Maine Railroad Co. 
60 " American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
50 " Northern Idaho & Montana Power Co. preferred 
25 Great Northern Railway preferred 

$4,000 New York Railways Co., os, 1942. 
$1,000 New York Railways Co., 4s, 1942. 
$3,000 Southern Railway Co., 4s, 1956. 
$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co., 4s, 1929. 
$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co., 5s, 1946. 



Respectfully submitted, 



C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



94 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH FOR THE 
YEAR ENDING FEBRUARY i, 1917 

Lincoln, February 1, 1917. 

Contagious diseases treated during the year 1916, 
with no deaths: — 

Chicken pox 4 cases 

Diphtheria 1 case 

Scarlet fever 6 cases 

CHARLES E. CLARK, 

Member of the Board of Health. 



95 
ASSESSORS* REPORT 



The Board of Assessors submit the following report : — 


Number of residents assessed on property, 254 


non-residents assessed on property, 92 


" assessed on polls only, 


186 


" acres of land assessed, 


8,740 


" dwelling houses assessed, 


275^ 


" horses assessed, 


268 


" cows assessed, 


497 


" neat cattle other than cows 


assessed, 92 


" swine assessed, 


388 


" sheep assessed, 


189 


Value of land, exclusive of buildings, 


$502,275 00 


" " buildings, exclusive of land, 


1,108,395 00 


" " real estate, 


$1,610,670 00 


" " personal estate, 


2,616,061 00 


Total valuation, 


$4,226,731 00 


State tax, 


7,840 00 


County tax, 


5,059 40 


State highway tax, 


412 00 


Town grants, 


42,730 00 


Total, 


$56,041 40 


Number of polls, 


344 


Deduct part of corporation tax, 


$305 90 


Rate $13.00 per $1,000.00, 






Amount to be collected, 


$55,735 50 



CHARLES S. WHEELER, 
WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 
WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, 

Assessors. 



96 



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112 



REPORT OF BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 

The Board of Water Commissioners submit the follow- 
ing report for the year 1916: — 

A Triplex Electric Pump with a 25 horse power motor 
was purchased the latter part of March from the Rumsey 
Pump Company of Seneca Falls, New York, and the 
same was installed in the early part of June and has 
been in use since then. This pump has proved to be 
very satisfactory. In fact it is doing much better than 
the Rumsey Company promised. Our figures show that 
the cost of pumping with this pump is less than with 
our steam pump. The cost of coal alone was 1 4/5 cents 
per 1,000 gallons pumped. The cost of electric power 
plus cost of coal for heating building was 1 2/3 cents per 
1,000 gallons pumped. Besides this there has been a 
saving in labor cost and a saving of about $8.00 per 
month on oil and grease. Since the Electric Pump has 
been running we have been enabled, without extra labor, 
to keep a full reservoir, and this has resulted in a much 
better service for those houses on the higher lands. 

The steam plant is in condition so that it may be used 
at any time should occasion require. 

There is now a complete survey of the water system, 
the work having been completed this year. 

At the last Annual Town Meeting we were authorized 
to make an extension of pipe from near the house of 
Mr. Isaac N. MacRae to near the house of Miss Carrie 
B. Chapin. Owing to the scarcity of labor during good 
weather this was not done and rather than start on it 



113 



late in the Fall it was decided to wait until the Spring of 
1917, and we recommend that the necessary appropria- 
tion for this work be made at the coming Annual Meeting. 

Mr. James T. Laird has continued to serve in the same 
capacity as last year. 

JOSEPH S. HART, 
WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, 
JOHN ADAMS, 

Board of Water Commissioners. 



114 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS FOR YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1916. 



Lincoln Water Works, Lincoln, Middlesex County, Mass. 

General Statistics 

Population by census of 1915, 1310. 

Date of construction, 1874. 

By whom owned, Town of Lincoln. 

Source of supply, Sandy Pond, Lincoln, Mass. 

Mode of supply, Pumping. 

Pumping Statistics 

Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon, Cross compound Fly Wheel 

Pump, 12" and 20i" x 5f" x 1". 

Description of fuel used. 

Kind, hard coal for pumping, soft coal for banking. 

Brand of coal, Lackawanna, Pocahontas. 

Average price of hard coal, per gross ton, delivered, $7.55. 

Average price of soft coal, per gross ton, delivered, $7.00. 

Wood, price per cord, $3.50. 

Coal consumed pumping, including wood reduced to coal 

equivalent, 5 months and 7 days, ending June 7, 

1916, 153,271 pounds. 
Rumsey Triplex Pump, 10J" x 12", 25 horse power 

motor. 
Power, electricity. 
Power furnished by the Edison Electric Illuminating 

Company of Boston. 



115 



Number of gallons pumped from January 1, 1916, to 
June 8, 1916, 30,885,100, at a cost for coal, including 
wood equivalent, of $554.30. 

Number of gallons pumped from June 8, 1916, to Jan- 
uary 1, 1917, 47,199,544, at a cost for electric power, 
including cost of coal for heating building, of $787.00. 

Total water pumped for the year, 78,084,644 gallons. 

Average static head against which pumps work, 148.5 
feet. 

Average dynamic head against which pumps work, 
160 feet. 

Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses 
($3,142.38), per million gallons pumped, $40.29- 



116 



Statistics Relating to Distribution System. 



1. 



2. 
3. 

4. 



7. 



8. 



9. 



10. 



11. 



Mains. 

Kind of pipe used, 
cement lined, cast 
iron, wood stave, gal- 
vanized iron. 
Sizes, iy 2 " to 12". 
Extended during the 
year, none. 

Discontinued during 
the year, none. 
Total now in use, 
26.411 miles. 
Number of hydrants 
added during the 
year, 1. 

Number of hydrants 
(public and private) 
now in use, 123. 
Number of stop-gates 
added during the 
year, none. 
Number of stop-gates 
now in use, 133. 
Number of blow-offs, 
30. 

Range of pressure on 
mains, 40 pounds to 
102 pounds. 



Services 

12. Kind of pipe, galvan- 
ized iron and cement 
lined. 

13. Sizes, %" to 4". 

14. Extended, 35'. 

15. Discontinued, none. 

16. Number of service 
taps added during the 
year, 2. 

17. Number now in use, 
328. 

18. Average length of 
service, 12' + 

19. Average cost of new 
service, for the year, 
$20.00. 

20. Number of meters 
now in use, 44. 



117 







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118 



WATER WORKS DEPARTMENT 

OUTSTANDING BONDS 

Issue of 1897, due 1917, $10,000 00 

Issue of 1900, due 1930, 23,000 00 

Issue of 1902, due 1932, 9,000 00 

Issue of 1903, due 1933, 5,000 00 

Issue of 1904, due 1934, 5,000 00 

Issue of 1906, due 1936, 14,000 00 

Issue of 1907, due 1937, 4,000 00 

Issue of 1907, due one each year, 5,500 00 

Issue of 1911, due one each year, 3,500 00 



$79,000 00 



WATER RECEIPTS 

Domestic, $9,184 53 

Meter, 2,858 85 

Uncollected 2,313 00 

$14,356 38 



119 



REPORT OF CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

As the years follow in turn it seems hardly enough to 
say that the Cemetery has been cared for in the usual 
way, with the addition at times of a list of particulars 
that belong in the routine class. While the caretaking 
process is indispensable from every point of view, to re- 
port from time to time some changes of a permanent 
character that will improve the physical appearance of 
grounds seems a most desirable climax. 

Such changes do not pass away with the dying months 
of the year to be again repeated, but remain to gladden 
the eye for time to come. 

The noteworthy items would include, of course, the 
substantial treatment of avenues and paths with stone 
and gravel, the judicious planting of shrubs, which is 
always a pleasing addition to any landscape, and the 
artistic grouping of trees which may be spoken of with 
still greater emphasis as they not only please the present 
generation, but hold out their arms in welcome to those 
to come. 

With trees and shrubs and well kept paths we are 
following very closely to nature's ways of rural beauty. 
Although purely in the routine class the clipping of the 
hedge around the triangular cemetery and the mending 
of broken places in the row with new material seems 
worthy of mention. 

Some graveling has been done the past year and it 
seems desirable to largely increase the amount the 
coming year. No one thing improves the general 
appearance of either private or public grounds more than 
well kept avenues, a thing impossible without proper 
construction. 

With the desirable changes in mind it seems almost 
unfortunate that something for nothing is hardly an 



120 



attribute of our northern climate. Nature is not lavish 
with us, but continually calls for our assistance. As a 
consequence every move we make in nature's aid is 
attended with more or less expense, which can only be 
met by action of the Town. 

Should the improvements be made that are now under 
consideration it would require a small addition to the 
usual amount appropriated for Cemetery work, and as 
the accumulated fund has grown to quite respectable 
proportions your Committee would suggest that the 
amount to be expended be taken from that fund, thereby 
relieving the present burden of taxation to that extent. 

The sum of six hundred dollars ($600), which would 
be an addition of one hundred dollars ($100) to the usual 
amount, is respectfully requested. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JULIUS E. EVELETH, 
ROGER SHERMAN, 

Cemetery Commissioners. 



121 



THE TOWN TREASURER 

In Account with 

THE LINCOLN CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



Cash of Union Pacific R. R. Co., dividend 
" " Fitchburg R. R. Co., dividend 
" " American Sugar Refining Co., dividend 
" " Geo. H. Flint Est., for lot 
" " R. G. Crook, for lot .... 
" " C. H. Sherman, for lot .... 
George F. Harrington Est., care of lot 

Total 

Deposited in Middlesex Institution for Savings 



$12.00 

10.00 

28.00 

20.00 

20.00 

20.00 

100.00 

$210.00 

$210.00 



The following is a list of Securities held l>y the Lincoln Cemetery Com- 
missioners: — 

Four Shares American Sugar Refining Co.. preferred stock. 
Three Shares Union Pacific R. R. Co.. preferred stock. 
Two Shares Fitchburg R. R. Co., preferred stock. 



Also the following funds for the care of lots in cemetery, al 
deposited in the Middlesex Institution for Savings: — 

Orilla J. Flint Fund, $300.00, interest accrued 
Samuel Hartwell Fund, $300.00, interest accrued 
John H. Pierce Fund, $500.00, interest accrued 
Maria L. Thompson Fund, $500.00, interest accrued 
Annie A. Ray Fund, $300.00, interest accrued 
George F. Harrington Fund, $100.00 

Also 
General Fund deposited in Middlesex Institution for Savings 
amounting to . 



of which are 

$65.62 

65.62 

103.44 

109.22 

65.62 



$768.96 



(Signed) 



CHARLES S. WHEELER, 

Town Treasurer. 



122 



TREE WARDEN'S REPORT 

The Tree Warden submits to the Town his report for 
the year 1916: — 

The work of this department has been continued as in 
former years, removing dead trees, dead limbs, and limbs 
obstructing the highways. Lincoln has a great many trees 
per mile of roadway, and the majority of them must be 
climbed each year to remove perhaps a dead limb or two ; 
or maybe the weight of foliage has lowered a limb so as 
to be an obstruction on the highway, all of which means 
a great deal of work. The remarkable foliage that the 
trees had this season has not been observed for some years ; 
the foliage has not only been noticed for its unusual 
abundance, but also for its healthy color and unusually 
large leaves; this was due to the heavy snowfall during 
the winter and the extensive showers we had in the 
spring and early summer. 

The scarcity of the elm leaf beetle has been quite 
noticeable during the past season; however, the punc- 
tured leaves in some localities have indicated their 
presence and a few egg-clusters have been found here 
and there. In many parts of the town no trace of the 
larvae has been found this season. The gypsy and 
brown tail moth work has been carried on as formerly, 
creosoting the nests and spraying the trees on all the 
highways, and on private property where owners have 
asked for and paid for same, with very good results. 
During the year a small power sprayer has been pur- 
chased, which has proved to be an excellent addition for 



123 



doing orchard work. I found it necessary this year to 
take some action towards getting another large sprayer, 
as it is impossible to do the work we have to do with one 
sprayer, and the two old ones which have been used for 
a great many years have outlived their usefulness. I 
took this matter up with the State Moth Superintendent 
and he agreed to pay for half if the town would pay the 
other half, or $600.00. Now we can get about $300.00 
for the old sprayers, which will leave the town to pay 
$300.00 more, which I think is a very good investment, 
for if we are going to carry on this work we must keep 
up our equipment, and we cannot expect to get help 
from the State whenever we get ready to ask for it. 
I recommend that $2,500.00 be appropriated for moth 
and tree work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Tree Warden. 



124 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

The Trustees submit on the following pages the re- 
ports of the Treasurer and Librarian of the Lincoln 
Public Library for the year ending February 1st, 1917. 
They ask for an appropriation of S500 and the Dog 
Tax. 

C. LEE TODD, 
Chairman of Trustees. 



125 



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126 



STATISTICAL REPORT OF THE LINCOLN 

PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

FEBRUARY i, 1917. 

Number of volumes in Library, Feb. 1, 1916, 10,228 

Increase by purchase, 233 

Increase by gift, 13 

Increase by binding periodicals, 9 

Total increase, 255 

Number of volumes rebound, 19 
Number of volumes withdrawn replaced by 

new editions, 11 

Number of volumes in Library, Feb. 1, 1917, 10,483 

Total delivery of books for year, 8,335 

Largest delivery in one day, 149 

Smallest delivery in one day, 29 

Number of days Library was open, 103 

Gifts of books, periodicals, pictures, etc., have been 
received from the following persons: — Mr. William 
Howard Brett, Miss Marion E. Coville, Mrs. Robert 
DeNormandie, Mrs. J. Malcolm Forbes, Mr. Hudson 
Maxim, Miss Bertha Scripture, Mrs. J. Storrow, Mr. 
B. D. Sweet, Miss A. E. Weston, Miss E. T. Williams. 

Gifts of bulletins, catalogues, etc., from Libraries and 
other institutions, as follows: — Boston Public Library, 
Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Mass. Free Public Library 
Commission, Carnegie Hero Fund Commission, Mass. 
Agricultural Experiment Station, State Board of Agri- 
culture, Total Abstinence Society, Soldiers' Home, 
Woman's Education Association, Library of Congress, 
Groton Public Library, Hartford Public Library, 



127 



Brookline Public Library, Newton Public Library, 
Springfield Public Library, Worcester Public Library, 
Waltham Public Library, Concord Public Library, Con- 
cord Christian Science Literature Committee, Friends' 
Free Public Library, Germantown, New Britain Insti- 
tute, Newark, N. J., Public Library, Mass. Branch of 
Woman's Peace Party, World Peace Foundation, 
Vedanta Centre, United Shoe Machinery Co., Latin 
American News Association. 



128 

LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 
ACCESSIONS TO THE LIBRARY FOR 1916 
BIOGRAPHY 

Adams, Charles Francis, 1835-1915. An autobiography with 
a memorial address delivered November 17, 1915, by 

Henry Cabot Lodge 546.22 

Baldry, Alwys L. Burne-Jones. 1833-1898 .... 636.16 
Chalmers, Stephen. The beloved Physician, Edward Living- 
ston Trudeau 547 . 16 

Dwight, Elizabeth Amelia. Memorials of Mary Wilder White 632.24 

Epler, Percy H. Life of Clara Barton 641.17 

Evans, Lawrence B. Samuel W. McCall, Governor of Massa- 
chusetts 636.15 

Howells, William Dean. Years of my Youth .... 645.4 

Lee, Sir Sidney. Life of William Shakespeare .... 636 . 14 

Overton, Jacqueline M. Life of Robert Louis Stevenson . 641.18 

Rankin, Henry B. Personal recollections of Abraham Lincoln 636.17 

Richards, Laura E. and others. Julia Ward Howe. 2 vols. 641.15 

Smith, 0. Alphonso. O.Henry biography .... 645.3 

Sothern, Edward H. Melancholy tale of "Me." . . . 645.2 

Spender, Harold. General Botha : the career and the man . 645 . 1 
Willson, Beckles. Life of Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal. 

2 vols 641 . 16 

HISTORY 

Hart, Albert Bushnell. How our grandfathers lived. (Source 

readers in American history.) 356.15 

Ide, Emily Katharine. History and significance of the 

American flag 364 . 2 

Pattee, Fred Lewis. History of American literature since 

1870 . 356.13 

Powell, E. Alexander. Road to glory 356.14 

Sams, Conway Whittle. Conquest of Virginia; the forest 
primeval, an account, based on original documents, of 
the Indians in that portion of the continent in which 
was established the first English colony in America . . 304 . 1 

DESCRIPTION AND TRAVEL 

Bangs, John Kendricks. From pillar to post: Leaves from a 

lecturer's note-book 437 . 18 



425 


.27 


434 


.21 


425.28 


442 


.24 


44.5 


.22 


442 


.23 


435 


.27 


447 


.11 


425 


.30 


428 


.14 



129 



Birmingham, George A. From Dublin to Chicago: Some 
notes on a tour in America 

Cram, Ralph Adam. Heart of Europe 

Crow, Carl. Japan and America. A contr 

Douglas, Norman. Old Calabria 

Franck, Harry A. Tramping through Mexico, Guatemala, 
and Honduras. Being the random notes of an incurable 
vagabond 

French, Allen. Old Concord 

Howe, Frederic Q. Socialized Germany 

Johnson, Clifton. Highways and byways of New England; 
including the States of Massachusetts, New Hampshire. 
Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont and Maine 

Kilbourne, Frederick W. Chronicles of the White Mountains 

Muir, John. Travels in Alaska 

O'Shaughnessy, Edith. Diplomats wife in Mexico; Let 

from the American Embassy in Mexico City, covering 
the dramatic period between October S, 1913, and the 
breaking off of diplomatic relations on April 23, 1914, 
together with an account of the occupation of Vera 
Cruz 

Powell, John Wesley. First through the Grind Canyon: 
Being the record of the pioneer exploration of the 
Colorado River in lSti9-70 

Radziwill, Princess Catharine. Austrian Court from within 

Rinehart, Mary Roberts. Through Glacier Park: S 

America first with Howard Eaton 

Winter, Xevin O. Texas the marvellous: The State 

flags 

USEFUL ARTS 

Collins, A. Frederick. Book of electricity: Written to con- 
form to the tests of the Boy Scouts 135.26 

Dooley, William H. Textiles; for commercial, industrial, and 
domestic arts schools, also adapted to those engaged 
in wholesale and retail dry goods, wool, cotton, and 

dressmaker's trades 135.25 

Dyer, Walter A. Early American Craftsmen : Being a series 
of sketches of the lives of the more important person- 
alities of the early development of the industrial arts in 
America, together with sundry facts and photographs of 
interest to the collector of Americana .... 136.38 

Farmer, Lissie C. A. B. C. of home saving .... 137.29 
Hill, Janet McKenzie. Canning, preserving and jelly-making 147.28 
Rexford, Eben E. A. B. C. of vegetable gardening . 147.29 



147 


L2 


H2 


.25 


447 


.13 


413 


23 



130 



RELIGION. PHILOSOPHY 

Home, Charles Silvester. Romance of preaching. With an 
introduction by Charles R. Brown, D.D., and a bio- 
graphical sketch by Howard A. Bridgman, D.D. 

McGiSfert, Arthur Cushman. Rise of modern religious ideas 

Rihbany, Abraham Mitrie. The Syrian Christ. 

Worcester, Elwood. The issues of life 

Brent, Charles H. Inspiration of responsibility; and other 
papers 

GENERAL LITERATURE 



Backus, William V. Making happiness epidemic 

Barr, Amelia E. Three score and ten. Book for the aged. 

Those quiet years God gives to the people who are old 
Baynes, Ernest. Wild bird guests: How to entertain them, 

with chapters on the destruction of birds, their economic 

and aesthetic values, suggestions for dealing with their 

enemies, and on the organization and management of 

bird clubs 

Bloomfield, Meyer. Readings in vocational guidance 

Youth, school and vocation .... 
Burroughs, John. Under the apple boughs 
Conde, Bertha. The business of being a friend. With 

introduction by Richard C. Cabot 
Carey, Arthur A. Scout law in practise 
Castle, Agnes and Egerton. Little house in war time 
Crane, Frank. Adventures in common sense 
Crothers, Samuel McChord. Pleasures of an absentee 

lord 

Graham, Stephen. Way of Martha and the way of Mary 
Howard, William Lee . Breathe and be well 

Hudson, W. H. Birds and man 

Jordan, David Starr. Unseen empire; a study of the 

of nations that do not pay their debts 
Knott, Laura A. Vesper talk to girls 
Kropotkin, P. Mutual Aid : A factor in evolution 
Lindsay, Ben. B. and O'Higgins, H. J. The beast 
Lucas, E. Y. Clouds and silver .... 
Marden, Orison Swett. Making life a masterpiece 
Osborne, Thomas Mott. Society and prisons 
Phelps, William Lyon. Advance of the English novel 
Sergeant, Elizabeth Shepley. French perspectives . 
Smith, Elva S. and Hazeltine, Alice I. Christmas in legend 

and story 

Steiner, Edward A. The confession of a hyphenated American 

Introducing the American spirit 



land 



plight 



1134.17 
1137.12 
1125.25 
1125.20 

1125.21 



1313.25 
1317.5 



1316.22 
1312.8 
1317.4 

1511.15 

1534.28 
1316.24 
1516.23 
1511.14 

1516.27 
1312.15 
1313.24 
1511.13 

1312.20 
1327.27 
1511.12 
1313.23 
1516.26 
1336.25 
1336.24 
1516.22 
1516.24 

1316.23 
1511.16 
1312.12 



131 



Taft, William Howard. The Presidency: Its duties, its 

powers, its opportunities, and its limitations . 1511.17 

Tagore, Sir, Rabindranath. Fruit gathering .... 1516.28 

Wilson, Woodrow. On being human 1312.16 

The President of the United States .... 1335.24 



FICTION 



Andrews, Mary Raymond Shipman. The three things: The 

forge in which the soul of a man was tested . . . 763 . 12 

Old Glory 714.27 

Bailey, Temple. Contrary Mary 763.15 

Birmingham, G. A. Gossamer 7ti3.lt) 

Blackwood, Algernon. The extra day 911.27 

Booth, Edward C. Fondie 714.22 

Bosher, Kate Langley. People like that 76&.18 

Brown, Alice. The prisoner 715.24 

Bunner, H. C. Stories: First and second series 712.28 

Butler, Samuel. Way of all flesh 714.25 

Canfield, Dorothy. The bent twig 763.9 

Squirrel cage 763.18 

Clemens, Samuel L. (Mark Twain.) Life on the Mississippi 718.22 
Comfort, Will Levington. Child and country. A book of the 

younger generation 712.29 

Daudet, Alphonse. Tartarin of Tarascon. Tartarin on the 

Alps. Artist's wives 715.25 

Day, Holman. Blow the man down 912.19 

Deland, Margaret. The rising tide 716.33 

Farnol, Jeffrey. Beltane the smith 763.8 

Forman, Justus Miles. Twin sisters 763.21 

Furman, Lucy. Sight to the blind 763.10 

Garland, Hamlin. They of the high trails .... 711.25 

Gibbs, George. The yellow dove 911.28 

Glasgow, Ellen. Life and Gabriella 763 . 14 

Grey, Zane. Border legion 768 . 17 

Haggard, H. Rider. The ivory child 911.23 

Hallet, Richard Matthews. Trial by fire .... 711.26 

Hopkins, William. Those Gillespies 911.26 

Hough, Emerson. Magnificent Adventure 716.36 

Howells, William Dean. Daughter of the storage: and other 

things in prose and verse 911.24 

Leatherwood God 718.26 

Hudson, W. H. Green mansions; a romance of the tropical 

forest, with an introduction by John Galsworthy . . 915 . 27 

Tales of the Pampas 912.21 



132 



Maid of 76 



grace 



Hughes, Rupert. Clipped wings 

Thirteenth commandment 
Johnston, Mary. Fortunes of Garin 
Kelland, Clarence B. The hidden spring 
Knipe, Emilie Benson and Knipe, Alden Arthur 
London, Jack. Cruise of the Snark 

Little lady of the big house 
MacConnell, Sarah Warder. Why, Theodora? 
Maniates, Belle K. Mildew Manse 
Marshall, Archibald. Eldest son 

Exton Manor 

For the honour of the Clintons 

Greatest of these . 

Squire's daughter . 
Martin, George Madden. Emmy Lou's road to 
Nesbit, E. Incredible honeymoon 
Noble, Edward. The bottle-fillers 

Orczy, Baroness. Bronze eagle; story of the hundred days 
Parker, Gilbert. World for sale 
Porter, Eleanor H. Just David . 

Six star ranch 
Richmond, Grace 8. Mrs. Red Pepper 

Red Pepper Burns 

The second violin 

Under the country sky 
Rinehart, Mary Roberts. Tish 
Roche, Arthur Somers. Loot 
Sherwood, Margaret. The worn doorstep 
Sidgwick, Ethel. Duke Jones 
Singmaster, Elsie. Emmeline 
Smith, F. Hopkinson and F. Berkley. Enoch Crane: A novel 

begun by F. Hopkinson Smith and completed by F. 

Berkeley Smith 

Snaith, J. C. The sailor 

Spearman, Frank H. Nan of Music Mountain 

Strother, Emily Viel\ Eve Dorre 

Tarkington, Booth. Penrod and Sam . 

Tcheckofif, Anton. Russian silhouettes: More stories of Rus 

sian life 

Tompkins, Juliet Wilbor. Seed of the righteous 

Turvey-Hilton. The Van Haavens 

Updegraff, Robert R. Obvious Adams : Story of a successful 

man 

Verne, Jules. Around the world in eighty days 
Ward, Mrs. Humphrey. Lady Connie 
Warner, Anne. Susan Clegg and her love affairs 
Watts, Mary S. The rudder .... 



915.28 
716.30 

763.4 
711.24 
763.11 
714.26 
763.26 

763.6 
716.31 
925.31 
925.30 
716.37 
925.33 
925.32 
733.21 
718.24 
915.29 

763.1 
912.17 
763.19 
763 . 13 
712.27 
768.16 
716.35 
911 .25 
915.30 
711.27 
718.27 

763.5 
763.22 



733.20 

714.24 

763.17 

763.2 

718.23 

763.7 
763 .20 
714.28 

918.27 
918.26 
912.18 
715.23 
763.25 



133 



Webster, Jean. Dear enemy 

Wemyss, Mrs. George. Jaunty in charge 
Wharton, Edith. Xingu and other Btories 
White, Stewart Edward. The gray dawn . 
Wiggin, Kate Douglas. Romance of a Christmas card 
Wright, Harold Belle. When a man's a man 



7(53 3 
716.34 
918.25 
763.24 
718.25 
716.32 



POETRY. DRAMA 



Brownell, Atherton. The unseen empire: A Peace play in four 
acts 

Dix, Beulah Marie. Across the border: a play of the present 

Dixon, \Y. Macneile, Editor. Edinburgh book of Scottish 
veree. 1300-1900 

Hagedorn, Hermann. Makers of madness; a play in one act 
and three Boenes 

Kittredge, George Lyman. Shakspere: An address delivered 
on April 23, 1916, in Sanders Thc.-itre.at the request of the 
President and FeUowa of Harvard College . 

Service, Eloberl \Y. Rhymes of a Red Crossman . 

Shaw, Bernard. Androcles and the lion 

Pygmalion 

Trask, Katrina. In the vanguard 

Wentworth, Marion Graig. War brides: a play in one act 



1436 


is 


1436 


10 


1 135 


18 


1436.21 


1 135 


P.) 


1 136 23 


1 13.") 


2:) 


1 1:;.-> 


21 


1436.20 


1 138 22 



EUROPEAN WAR AM) ALLIED SIR!: 



Addams, Jane and others. Women at the Hague: The Inter- 
national Congress of women and its results, by three 
delegates to the Congress from the United States — Jane 
Addams. President International Congress at the Hague, 
and of the Peace party of America. Emily G. Raich. 
Professor of Economics and Sociology, Wellesley College. 
Alice Hamilton: investigator of industrial d 
United States Department of Labor 

Adler, Felix. The world crisis and its meaning 

Angell, Norman. Arms and industry: A study of the founda- 
tions of International polity 

Dangers of half preparedness: a plea for a declaration of 

American policy 

The world's highway: Some notes on America's relation 
to the sea; power and non-military sanctions for the law 
of nations 

Beith, John Hay (Ian Hay, pseud) 

Davis, Richard Harding. With the French in France and 
Salonika 



1317.3 
1317 2 

1312.7 

1312.29 



1335.23 



425.29 



134 



Dearmer, Mabel. Letters from a field hospital: with 

memoir of the author 

Fernau, Hermann. Because I am a German 

Gladden, Washington. Forks of the road 

Green, Horace. Log of a non-combatant . 

Hay, Ian. First hundred thousand: Being the unofficial 

chronicle of a unit of "K.(l)" 

Holmes, John Haynes. New wars for old: Being a statement 

of radical pacifism in terms of force versus non-resistance, 

with special reference to the facts and problems 

Howe, Frederic C. Why war 

Jones, Fortier. With Serbia into exile: An American's ad 

ventures with the army that cannot die 
Jordan, David Starr. The human harvest : A study of the 

decay of races through the survival of the unfit 
Kipling, Rudyard. Fringes of the fleet .... 
Maxim, Hudson. Defenseless America .... 
Mead, Lucia Ames, Editor. Overthrow of the war system 
Mead, Lucia Ames. Swords and ploughshares. The sup 

planting of the system of war by the system of law . 

Oliver, Frederick. Ordeal by battle 

Sheahan, Henry. A volunteer Poilu .... 

Usher, Roland G. Challenge of the future 

Ward, Mrs. Humphrey. England's effort: Loiters to an 

unknown friend 

Wells, H. G. What is coming: A European forecast 
Wharton, Edith. Fighting France: From Dunkerque to 

Belfast . 

Wood, Leonard. The military obligation of citizenship 



1312.14 
1312.26 
1312.30 
1312.10 

1312.12 



1312.25 
1312.27 

445.23 



1312 


.22 


1312 


.11 


1312 


.19 


1312 


.18 


1312 


.22 


1316 


.12 


1516 


.25 


1312 


.23 


1311.2 


1312 


.24 


1312 


13 


1312 


.28 



BOOKS FOR YOUNG READERS 

Bangs, Ella Matthews. At the house on the grounds; a story 

for girls 1245.23 

Baum, L. Frank. Wizard of Oz 1242.23 

Beard, D. C. Outdoor handy book: For playground, field 

and forest . 1231.24 

Blanchard, Amy E. Camp fire girls of Brightwood . 1245 8 

Brown, Abbie Farwell. Kisington town 1245.6 

Browne, Frances. The wonderful chair; and the tales it 

told 1245.20 

Burgess, Thornton W. Adventures of Buster Bear . . C. S. 7 

Adventures of Chatterer, the red squirrel . . . C. S. 4 

Adventures of Grandfather Frog C. S. 6 

Adventures of Jerry Muskrat C. S. 8 

Adventures of Old Mr. Toad 1242.26 

Mother West Wind "How" stories C. S. 9 



135 



Burnett, Frances Hodgson. Little hunchback Zia . . 1245.28 

Burton, Charles. Camp Bob's hill 1245.14 

Dowd, Emma C. Doodles: The sunshine boy . . 1245.4 

Eggleston, Edward. Hoosier school boy .... 1245.17 
Fitzhugh, Percy K. Along the Mohawk trail: or, Boy Scouts 

on Lake Champlain 1245.7 

Francis, J. G. Book of cheerful cats: And other animated 

animals C.S.I. 3 

Hasbrouck, L. S., Compiler. Boy's Parkman: Stories from the 

historical works of Francis Parkman .... 1245.25 
Haskell, Helen Eggleston. Katrinka: Story of a Russian 

child 1245.24 

Harris, Alice L. Eugene Field,, reader 1245.3 

Hunting, Gardner. Sandy's Pal : or how fire forged a friendship 124;") 13 
Jacobs, Caroline E. and Richards, Lela H. Blue Bonnet keeps 

bouse: or, the new home m the Bast. Sequel to a Texas 

Blue Bonnet 1245 19 

Jewett, John Howard. Bunny stories 1245.16 

Judd, Mary Catharine. Wigwam stories, told by Xorth 

American Indians. With illustrations by Angel de Cora 

(Hinook-Mahiwi-Kilinaka.) 1245.15 

McGuire, Walter P. and Mathews. Franklin K. Boy Scout's 

yearbook. . * 831.12 

Meigs, Cornelia. Kingdom of the winding road . . 1245 l 
Mokrievitch, Vladimir De Bogory. When I was a hoy in 

Russia 1245.22 

Parton, James. Captains of industry. Men of business who 

did something besides making money .... 1245.5 
Poulsson, Emilic, Translator. Johnny Blossom. From the 

Norwegian of Zwilgmeyer 1245.21) 

Pyle, Katharine. Six little ducklings .... . 1245.2 

Wonder tales retold 1242.24 

Remington, Frederic. Way of an Indian 1242.25 

Rhoades, Nina. Little girl next door 1245.21 

Richards, Laura E. Happy little time; a partly true story for 

children of Betty's age 1245.29 

Rogers, Ethel. Sebago-Wohelo camp fire girls: With an in- 
troduction by Mrs. Luther Halsey Gulick . . . . 1245 . 12 

Seton, Ernest Thompson. Wild animal ways .... 1245.18 

Stocking, Jay T. Golden goblet; and other stories . . . 1245.27 
Stevenson, Burton Egbert. Home book of verse for young 

folks 1245.11 

Vandercook, Margaret, Ranch girls at Rainbow Lodge . . 1245.9 

Waterman, Nixon. "Boy wanted": a book of cheerful counsel S36.26 

The girl wanted 836.25 



136 



PERIODICALS 

Atlantic monthly. Vols. 115, 116. 1915. 

Century illustrated monthly magazine. Vols. 89, 90. 1914, 

1915. 
Harper's monthly magazine. Vols. 130, 131. 1914, 1915. 
St. Nicholas; an illustrated magazine for young folks. 

Vols. 41 1 , 41' 2 , 1913, 1914. Vol. 42 2 , 1915. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE 



SCHOOL YEAR 1916 




138 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

HENRY E. WARNER, Chairman, Term expires 1917 
ANTHONY J. DOHERTY, Secretary, Term expires 1919 
MRS. ELIZABETH W. BLODGETT, 

Term expires 1918 
Superintendent of Schools 
C. S. LYMAN 

Supervisor of Manual Training and Drawing 
WALTER F. BRACKETT 

Supervisor of Sewing 
MRS. ABBIE P. SMITH 

Supervisor of Cooking 
BERTHA A. WILSON 

Teachers 

Lincoln Grammar — Grades VII— VIII 
HELEN C. STRONG 

Lincoln Grammar — Grades V-VI 
LETITIA EBBS 

Lincoln Primary — Grade IV 
HELEN P. JONES 

Lincoln Primary — Grade III 
HELEN M. BOWKER 

Lincoln Primary — Grades I-II 
HATTIE B. HEATH 

South Primary — Grades I-II 
ELAINE D. POOLE 

Attendance Officer 
MATTHEW H. DOHERTY 



139 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

It is unnecessary to repeat here the details as to the 
School work which are fully set out in the report of the 
Superintendent, which, with the usual tables of statistics, 
is attached to this report. 

We feel that the subject of transportation of pupils 
should be brought again to the attention of the town, and 
we refer to our remarks on this subject in our last annual 
report. The summary of school expenses for the year, 
which accompanies this report, shows a total expendi- 
ture of 814,633.52. If the expense of tuition and trans- 
portation of high school pupils is deducted the expense 
of the local schools in the town is shown to be 810,218.56. 
Of this $2,951.10 is paid for the transportation of children 
to and from the schools in the town. That is, 28 8/10 
per cent of the cost of the local schools is for carrying 
the children, and a considerable increase of this propor- 
tion must be expected and provided for unless the policy 
is changed. 

It is to be remembered that the town is not required 
by law to appropriate money for this purpose, although 
it is permitted to do so. The law does provide, however, 
that if money is appropriated for transportation of 
children it can only be expended by the School Com- 
mittee. But a town is not under any obligation to 
make such an appropriation, nor, if it does, is the School 
Committee bound to act. 

Newcomb v. Rockport, 183 Mass. 74 
(See also report of Superintendent attached to last 
annual report of School Committee.) 



140 



We think that this matter of transportation should 
be dealt with in an appropriation by itself and wholly 
apart from the appropriation for the schools, and we 
therefore do not include any amount for that purpose in 
recommending for the expenses of the schools for the 
current year an appropriation of $11,000. 

Whatever the action of the town may be as to local 
transportation, we believe that, for the present at least, 
the cost of transportation of pupils to the high schools in 
other towns, when such transportation is necessary, 
should be paid by the town. We accordingly recommend 
a separate appropriation for transportation of pupils 
of at least $1,000, which we believe will cover all neces- 
sary transportation for high school pupils for the current 
year. 

We wish to point out that this would make no pro- 
vision for local transportation and that in so far as the 
town may wish to provide for that it must be by a larger 
appropriation. 

HENRY E. WARNER, 
ELIZABETH W. BLODGETT, 
ANTHONY J. DOHERTY, 

Committee. 



141 



SUMMARY OF SCHOOL EXPENSES 
FOR THE YEAR 1916 

Appropriation $15,000. 00 



Salaries of superintendent and teachers 5,104. 00 

High School tuition 3,543. 11 

High School transportation 871 . 85 

Transportation of children (local) 2,803.00 

Repairs on school buildings 60. 44 

Barges, repairs, etc 148. 10 

Janitor services 647. 00 

Fuel 508.46 

Water service 105. 50 

School physician 200. 00 

Supplies 535 . 63 

Miscellaneous 106. 43 



$14,633.52 



142 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

To the School Committee of the Town of Lincoln: — 

In presenting my tenth annual report I shall mention 
some of the changes and improvements made in our 
schools during the past decade. 

Ten years is a long term of service for a superin- 
tendent of school in a small town, but this long term has 
enabled me with the aid of able teachers to develop, put 
into operation and to mature many plans which have 
been a great benefit to the children of this town. 

The general tone and efficiency of the schools have 
improved. The great majority of the pupils are inter- 
ested in their school work and are earnest in their study. 
I wish I could say this for all the pupils. 

The teachers have worked hard and effectively in 
training the children how to study, think and reason. 
The recitations are conducted in such a manner as to 
stimulate these activities, rather than to develop simply 
the memory. This is a great gain over the usual method of 
teaching, which too often is mere machine work, devoid 
of any real thinking. 

School superintendents and others who have visited 
our schools have often spoken of the excellent discipline, 
the good spirit existing between teachers and pupils, the 
interest which the children have in their work and the 
power they have gained to study effectively and reason 
intelligently on various subjects. Not only the bright 
children but those of mediocre ability have gained much 
by this kind of training. In the years to come we hope 
to make still greater progress. 



143 
Increase in Attendance 

During the past decade there has been a large increase 
in the number of children attending our schools and in 
the number of Lincoln children going to the High schools. 
In the year ending June, 1907, we registered 117 pupils, 
while in the year ending June, 1916, we registered 201. 
In 1907 we sent 22 pupils to high school, while last year 
the number was 44, including 5 in the Concord Agricul- 
tural High School. Thus our high school pupils have 
doubled in number, while in the grades the increase has 
been 72 per cent. This means that our children remain 
in school longer and more enter high schools. 

Some of our school rooms became so crowded that the 
teachers were overloaded with work and the pupils were 
not receiving the attention which they needed. This 
condition became so acute in the spring of 1915 that we 
furnished and opened a new room in the center building. 
This has greatly improved our work in the primary 
grades. Now all our pupils, except about twenty in 
grades 1 and 2 at South Lincoln, attend the Lincoln 
school at the Center. 

The Special Teacher 

In the fall of 1911 when some of our school rooms wera 
first crowded beyond seating capacity we engaged a 
special teacher to aid the regular teachers. This special 
teacher took individual pupils or groups of children to 
the office where she taught them how to study, explained 
difficult subjects and helped children, who for any reason 
had dropped behind their classes, to make up their work. 
Thus the backward children received much needed 
individual instruction, and any pupil, who on account of 
sickness, had lost some important part of the work, was 
helped over the hard places. 



144 



In most schools there are some children with good 
minds who lack power of concentration and therefore 
do not profit as much from their schooling as they should. 
The special teacher has greatly benefited such pupils by 
training them in right habits of study. For the past 
five years a special teacher has been in the Lincoln school 
during the whole or a part of each year. 

The New Schoolhouse and Practical Arts 

During the year 1908 the new schoolhouse at the 
center was completed and occupied. The school rooms 
and surroundings are vastly better than those of ten 
years ago. It is in every way an attractive, comfortable 
and adequate school building, and has furnished us 
opportunity for doing a larger quantity and better 
quality of work. 

With work rooms and equipment provided for manual 
training, cooking and sewing, we have extended educa- 
tional privileges to the Lincoln children which few small 
towns enjoy. As I look back over the decade I feel that 
these departments have stimulated growth, added much 
valuable training and given the children the power to do 
many things well. 

Our boys have acquired skill in the use of tools and the 
ability to plan and construct furniture and other articles 
useful at home and in the school. Each year they have 
made several things to use in our school rooms. 

Mr. Brackett reports in part for the last year as 
follows : — 

"We have made a sand box and a number of window 
boxes for the different rooms to start flowers in, also some 
shelves in Miss Jones's room. We have in process of 
making a large table, cold frames, chicken feeders, and 
various pieces of furniture for use in the pupils' home. 

We are trying an innovation this year in using a great 
deal of cypress. It is a good durable wood, works 



145 



easily, takes stain nicely and costs less than oak or white 
wood, so will be quite a saving in our lumber bill." 

Our girls have learned to sew, cut and fit a variety of 
useful garments for themselves and their sisters. They 
have learned how to care for the kitchen and dining-room, 
keep the rooms and dishes clean and orderly, to cook a 
large variety of foods and to serve a dinner in good style. 
They have acquired much skill in preparing wholesome, 
palatable food and in canning and preserving. They 
have learned also the nutritive value of various common 
foods and therefore what will make a well balanced meal. 
By sampling the food many times teachers and super- 
intendent have tested the girls' ability to cook and never 
found them wanting. This training will go a long way 
towards developing good home makers. 

Several years we exhibited the products from our 
manual training, cooking and sewing departments and 
also vegetables, raised by the children in home gardens, 
at the county fair in Framingham. The Lincoln schools 
have each time received a good number of premiums, 
much larger in fact than the number of our school 
children would warrant, for we competed with towns and 
cities many times the size of Lincoln. One year in 
manual training our boys gained more points than the 
boys of the city of Marlboro and were not far behind the 
large towns of Natick and Framingham. This means 
that our boys' products showed much care and skill. 

The Play Grounds 

Few school buildings are surrounded by such adequate 
and pleasant play grounds. We have two baseball 
diamonds, one of the usual size for the large boys and a 
small one for the little fellows. There is also a small 
field for foot ball practice. The janitor takes great 
interest in the boys, umpiring and overseeing their 



146 



games. In this way he makes himself very valuable 
to the school. 

The girls have a basket-ball equipment, and there are 
swings," teeters and a giant stride for the use of all the 
pupils. 

We keep constantly on hand a variety of balls, bats 
and other play material, as we believe the right kind of 
play does much toward the education of our children 
and improvement of their health. 

The teachers take turns in supervising the yard and 
the play of the girls and small children, this insures every 
child having a share in the games and getting much 
needed exercise. Much free play is also encouraged. 

In winter the hill on the northeast side of the school 
building furnishes good coasting. As we insist that all 
pupils leave their rooms at recess and noon intermission, 
they have much time for open-air play. 

Gymnastic Exercises 

The school physician reported a number of cases of 
narrow chests and defective standing and sitting posi- 
tions, and recommended corrective exercises. The com- 
mittee made a rule that each teacher devote fifteen min- 
utes daily to such corrective exercises. To give sufficient 
time for this, fifteen minutes were added to the school 
day on Monday, Tuesday and Friday. The teachers 
are faithful and energetic in observing this rule. We 
hope for much improvement in the children's posture, 
and also in their health. Dr Wood reports that a large 
number of the children in all schools throughout the 
country need corrective exercises, but that too little 
is being done in this line. 



147 
School Physician 

The school physician and occasionally a nurse under 
his direction have done much for the physical comfort 
and health of the children. The nurse has shown the 
children how to keep clean and neat, and free from some 
of the physical troubles which beset so many children. 
Both parents and children should gladly welcome this 
aid to physical improvement. 

Each year the school physician examines all the pupils 
and when serious defects are found sends cards to their 
parents. Some of the parents heed this warning and 
have the defects remedied. There are still too many 
children whose eyes and teeth need attention, but the 
parents do not realize the importance of these warnings. 
By remedying these defects in early childhood the health 
and vigor can be greatly conserved. Good health is a 
great aid to vigorous thinking. Man}- a child has been 
changed from a dull to a bright pupil by having his 
teeth or eyes or tonsils given proper attention. 



Short Sessions 

In 1911 we began our present daily schedule with a 
short school day, beginning at 8.45 A.M. and closing 
at 1.15 P.M. (now 1.30 P.M.), with fifteen minutes 
recess at 10.15 and twenty minutes at noon. But on 
Wednesdays and Thursdays, when we have our manual 
training and household arts classes, we close an hour 
later (2.15 P.M.), and have a noon recess of 45 minutes. 
With these short hours there is little danger of any pupil 
becoming fatigued, so we have been able to speed up our 
work in all classes. There is no time for play or idleing 
during school hours. Every one must keep busy to get 
his work done. 



148 
Teachers 

We have been fortunate in securing many good 
teachers during the decade, but too often some of the 
best teachers have remained in town only a few terms. 
We hope that the larger salaries which we are now paying 
will in future retain the services of our best teachers 
for man} r years. The only way to maintain good 
schools is to secure and retain good teachers. As I go 
through the school each week I find the children busy 
studying or giving their attention to the recitation. 
They are gaining the valuable habit of concentrating 
their minds on the work in hand or giving attention and 
taking part in the subject for class discussion. This is 
one of the most valuable results of our education. 

Some of our teachers have taken such deep interest in 
their pupils that they have visited their homes to meet 
the parents and become acquainted with home condi- 
tions. This enables them better to meet the children's 
needs in school work. When we remember that some 
homes are three or four miles from the school, these 
teachers deserve great credit for their efforts to learn 
more about the children. On special occasions the 
parents have been invited to the school and after the 
exercises have met teachers and superintendent and 
talked about the children and their needs. This has 
been beneficial to all concerned. I hope the people will 
meet the teachers socially and make their life in town 
so pleasant that they will wish to remain with us. 



The Three R s 

We recognize the value of "the three R's" and give 
them much attention in the grades. The greatest work 
of the lower grades is the teaching of reading, for the 



149 



ability to read easily and understanding^ means the 
opening of all other lines of knowledge. 

In 1907 we introduced a new system of reading in the 
primary grades, which the teachers carefully studied 
and in the use of which they became very proficient. 
We have revised and added to this system to meet our 
special needs and we use a large variety of books and 
other reading material. The little children quickly be- 
came interested in their reading lessons and made rapid 
progress. I believe the primary children have made 
a gain of one full year in the power to read, and this is a 
modest estimate. As soon as the pupils can read without 
any great difficulty the other subjects can bo taught in 
less time and with much less fatigue. 

We are constantly struggling to improve the penman- 
ship of our pupils. Besides the regular work at school 
we have recently inaugurated the plan so successful in 
business schools of having the pupils practice the daily 
lesson at home and bring the sheets to the teacher for 
inspection. Good penmanship can only be acquired and 
retained by careful and continued practice. High school 
and college students often go backward or even destroy 
their earlier penmanship habits by scribbling while 
taking notes. As some pupils who do well in the super- 
vised penmanship period, often write poorly when work- 
ing on other lessons, the teachers must be constantly on 
the alert to correct such bad habits. 

We have continually tried to make the arithmetic 
work practical, accurate and rapid. The aim in the first 
four grades is to master the four fundamental processes, 
with a little work in fractions, become familiar with 
simple measurements used in common business tran- 
sactions, and to gain the power to work simple problems. 
Playing store with the use of toy money and a variety 
of articles, furnished by advertisers and the children, 



150 



has familiarized the pupils with the problems of buying 
and selling and making change. The grammar grade 
pupils continue the measurement work, especially in 
connection with their manual training, sewing, drawing 
and cooking, and gain a knowledge of fractions, decimals, 
and percentage with their most practical problems. We 
believe it best to spend our time on the arithmetic which 
is in constant use and skip the puzzling and exceptional 
problems which only mathematicians use. We use 
several books to secure a large number of examples and 
problems suitable for each grade and the Thompson 
Minimum Essentials for rapid, accurate drill lessons. 
We are also following the methods of checking our work 
in the fundamental process followed by many business 
firms. These methods are so simple and so generally 
used in the best business houses that each child should 
acquire the habit of always using them and so feel sure 
that his work is correct before leaving it. 



Language 

Each teacher has a copy of Sheridan's Speaking and 
Writing English, which contains many excellent sug- 
gestions for daily language work. Our aim is to have 
the children form the habit of using good, clear English 
in expressing their thoughts, both orally and in writing. 
As many children often hear poor English at home and 
among their companions, this work is very important. 
All through life the ability to use good English will add 
much to their success and happiness. This is one of the 
most difficult subjects in the curriculum, and requires 
careful teaching and constant drill. Before leaving our 
schools we hope each child will be able to write a good 
letter. 



151 
Literature 

We have been making the study of literature very 
prominent. Much good literature is read by the pupils 
during the regular reading period and for outside assign- 
ment. Beginning with the first grade, each class learns 
many short poems and memory gems which inculcate 
noble sentiments in the most beautiful language. 

We have also made lists of poems for each grade, 
which contain beautiful and correct pictures of natural 
phenomena or historical stories of great people and im- 
portant events. Some of the poets have described 
typical days of the seasons, varieties of the weather and 
the beauties of nature in such strong, vivid language 
that the reading of these verses transfers one in imagina- 
tion to the season or climate or locality described. I 
have had many of these poems typewritten and placed 
in the grade teachers' hands to be memorized by their 
classes. In this way literature is correlated with both 
geography and history. This correlation has added 
much to the interest and effectiveness of our teaching. 

We have exercised great care to select poems suitable 
to the age of the pupils and have been fortunate to find 
many which the children greatly enjoy. Surely such 
teaching is worth much to the children. They are 
storing in their minds many of the treasures of our best 
literature, which will have a beneficial influence on their 
lives. They will be able later to quote freely from these 
literary gems and so add force and beauty to their 
writing and speaking. This memory work adds many 
choice words to their vocabulary. 

We try to make this recitation period one which the 
children will thoroughly enjoy, so that they will acquire 
a love for good literature. We have had a large degree 
of success. 



152 

Geography 

We have developed our study of geography into one of 
the most practical and self-developing subjects in the 
whole curriculum. This study is taken up in such a way, 
that from the beginning it is within the children's grasp 
and arouses their interest in and desire to know more 
about the earth and its relation to man and his progress 
in civilization. 

We begin by observing, studying, and comparing 
home environments and the various natural phenomena 
that are interesting to children. Excursions are made 
to fields and woods and the things observed are studied 
in the class room. 

Sandboards are built up to represent different occupa- 
tions and home life, including our own. In working out 
these models, the children get such deep impressions of 
the life and scenes portrayed that they will never forget 
them. They draw maps of the local models and then of 
larger areas around town and later of states and countries. 
The map thus is full of meaning to our pupils. 

By studying the physical features, the industries and 
the mode of travel, etc., of our own locality and then 
gradually reaching out to surrounding towns, the state, 
New England, our nation, North America, and finally 
to the whole world and by constantly making compari- 
sons, our children's horizon gradually widens, their 
imagination and knowledge greatly increase, and their 
power to think and reason grows enormously. 

We begin the work on foreign lands in the lower 
grades by the study of home and child life, of various 
peoples, using pictures and stories, many of which can 
now be easily obtained. While doing this the children 
build sand table models of this home life or construct 
large posters to represent the same. Children love to 
make things, to build what they study. It makes the 



153 



work more interesting and enables them to remember 
the lessons longer. This method also stimulates their 
desire to know more about the world and its people. 

History 

Our study of history is also made interesting, practical, 
and broadening. We pass lightly over many of the less 
essential events, but emphasize and study carefully 
the great and far reaching events and the men whose 
lives have vitally influenced the world and man's prog- 
ress. There are many series of events which are so 
interrelated that by their study we can trace man's rise 
politically or industrially, or educationally, or along 
some other line, as surely as we can walk up a flight of 
stairs, step by step. This method of studying history 
develops the power to select the essential points, to 
compare and to judge of their worth. It will also teach 
the students how to avoid the mistakes of the past and to 
apply right principles in their future acts. The pupils 
like this method better than the old senseless memory 
method, and gain much more from such history work. 

Current Events 

We constantly correlate geography and history with 
each other and with, current events. The happenings 
of today become the history of tomorrow. Geograph- 
ical conditions often control historical events. 

The year (1908) that the United States fleet went 
around the world, we followed its movements and studied 
the various cities where it stopped, also the country 
back of these cities. Pupils and teachers brought papers 
and pictures to school, all of which were put upon the 
bulletin board and used in the recitations. 

As soon as news came of the great Messina earthquake, 
the regular work in geography was dropped for a time, 
and all the upper classes studied Italy, Sicily, the Med- 



154 

iterranean regions, and the causes of earthquakes. The 
disastrous floods in Ohio and Indiana in March, 1913, 
turned our attention to the Ohio valley and the study of 
the United States weather maps and the causes of floods 
with their effects. When some startling story was 
published about Mexico, the pupils took up that un- 
fortunate country. 

During the past two and a half years the seventh and 
eighth grades have given much attention to Europe and 
Asia Minor and the other parts of the world immediately 
affected by the great war. The newspapers and maga- 
zines have contained many well written, valuable, and 
interesting articles about the warring nations, their land, 
people and industries, their cities, buildings and art 
treasures. Many of these articles are well illustrated 
and, for a time, often took the place of text books. We 
are neutral and devoid of bitterness in handling this 
question. We study geographical conditions, peoples, 
events, and not the disputed causes of the war, race 
hatreds, battles and slaughter. There is no wrangling 
or ill feeling on any of these war questions in our schools. 

We have forty copies of that excellent little weekly 
paper published for schools, " Current Events," for our 
four upper grades. The children read this with much 
interest and keep informed on the most important events 
in present day history. The teachers bring in maga- 
zines which, with their illustrations, are a great aid 
in this work. 

This connects our school work with real life and present 
day interests. The children learn more in a week than 
they would in a month studying dry facts ; and what they 
learn is of such vital interest that they remember it. 

Larger Appropriations Needed 

The high cost of living is no respecter of persons. 
Teachers have to contend with adverse financial condi- 



155 



tions as well as other workers, yet manufacturers and 
others have raised the wages of their employees. Why 
should not the teachers have their salaries increased? 
Teachers, as a rule, are poorly paid. Every good teacher 
earns much more than her salary. It is high time that 
we recognized the worth of the teachers to the com- 
munity in a substantial way. 

The prices of coal, books, papers and other materials 
absolutely necessary for good school work have greatly 
increased during the past year. This is especially the 
case with papers. We use large amounts of arithmetic 
paper, and various kinds of cheaper writing papers, all of 
which have increased in price from 100 to 200 per cent 
within twelve months. We used to pay 12 to 14 cents 
for a package of arithmetic paper, which is quoted today 
at 38 cents per package. Examination paper, (the most 
used of our writing paper) has increased from 26 cents 
to 69 cents per package. As there is no prospect for 
lower prices in school supplies for many months to come, 
a larger appropriation will be needed for this item. 

Last February I learned that paper would increase 
greatly in price, so placed our orders at that time for a 
year's supply of the staple articles, thus saving the town 
many dollars. 

In November I learned that another increase was 
imminent and so placed orders for 1917 at that time. 
Within two weeks papers jumped from 25 to 50 per cent 
in price, arithmetic paper going from 28 cents to 38 
cents per package. 

Many books will increase in price this winter, so I 
place early orders for some books which we should need 
within the next few months. 

Nearly all our bills now contain this stamp: " Owing 
to existing conditions all prices are subject to change 
without notice. Billed at best possible prices." 



156 



The above will give a good idea of the increased cost 
of running the schools in these times of inflated prices. 
As compared with other small towns and even larger 
towns, the Lincoln schools are doing excellent work and 
giving the children large opportunities. Therefore the 
people of Lincoln should be glad to support them gen- 
erously. 

In closing I wish to commend the teachers for their 
earnest, efficient work, and to thank the committee and 
people for their support and encouragement. 
Respectfully submitted, 

C. S. LYMAN, 
Superintendent of Schools. 



157 



ROLL OF HONOR 

The following pupils have been neither absent nor 
tardy for the time designated: — 

For Three Years 
William Robus 



For Tiro Terms 



Joseph Eaton 
Edward Flint 
Arthur Butcher 
Lyman Cousins 
Richard Nelson 
Blanche Cousins 



Helen Farquhar 
Nancy McCormack 
Mary Calkins 
Gladys Wetherbee 
Rosa Catoni 
Mary P. Lennon 



For One Term 



Francis Corrigan 
Robert Donaldson 
Malcolm Donaldson 
Edmund Giles 
Lee Todd 
Marie Connors 
Marjorie Doherty 



Ethel MacRae 
Evelyn Stuart 
Florence Bennett 
Florence Morgan 
D. Everett Sherman 
Alexander Chapman 
Alice Connors 



158 



Pauline Chamberlain 
Bertha Chapin 
Edward O'Brien 
Louisa Monella 
Harold Rocks 
Grace Farquhar 
Rothwell MacRae 
Edmund Stuart 
Alice Ambrose 
Bernice Cousins 



Mary F. Lennon 
Edward Sleginski 
Wilbert MacRae 
Edward Rocks 
George Flint 
Emily Chamberlain 
Chedo Chamberlain 
Dominic Piantedose 
Walter Nelson 
Concettina Strangio 



159 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Winter Term begins Tuesday, January 2, 1917, ends 
Friday, March 23 ; twelve weeks. 

Spring Term begins Monday, April 2, ends Friday, 
June 15; eleven weeks. 

Fall Term begins Tuesday. September 4, ends Friday, 
December 21 ; sixteen weeks. 

Winter Term begins Monday, January 7, 1918, ends 
March 22, eleven weeks. 

Spring Term begins Monday, April 1, ends Friday, 
June 14; eleven weeks. 

Recess from Wednesday before Thanksgiving to 
Monday following. 

Holidays: New Year's Day, Washington's Birthday, 
Patriot's Day, Memorial Day, Columbus Day. 

Length of school year, thirty-eight weeks. 



160 

STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1915-1916. 

Number of children in Town, September, 1915, 

between the ages of 5 and 16: boys, 131, girls, 

114; total 245 

Number of children in Town, September, 1915, 

between the ages of 7 and 14: boys, 90, girls, 

77; total 167 

Number of children in Town, September, 1915, 

between the ages of 5 and 7: boys, 22, girls, 16; 

total 38 

Number of children in Town, September, 1915, 

between the ages of 14 and 16: boys, 19, girls, 21; 

total 40 

Enrollment for State report for the year, ending 

June, 1916 186 

Supplementary Enrollment 15 

Enrollment between 7 and 14 years of age . .153 
Number attending Concord High School . . 25 
Number attending Concord Agricultural School . 5 

Number attending Walt ham High School . . 14 
Number of regular teachers employed ... 6 

Number of special teachers employed ... 3 

Number of teachers who have graduated from 

Normal School 2 

Number of teachers who have graduated from 

Training School 2 

Total number registered in Lincoln schools during 

the year, ending June, 1916 201 

Number of pupils sent to High schools from 

Lincoln 44 

Number of pupils receiving instruction at town 

expense 245 

Number completing Grammar School, June, 1916: 

boys, 8, girls, 7; total 15 

Number of pupils entering High Schools: boys, 7, 

girls, 7; total 14 



161 



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163 



WARRANT 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln, in 
said County: 

GREETING : 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify the legal voters of said 
Town of Lincoln, qualified to vote at Town Meeting for 
the transaction of Town affairs, to meet in the Town 
Hall, in said Lincoln, on, Monday, the fifth day of March 
next, at 11.30 o'clock A.M., by posting a copy of this 
Warrant by you attested, in each of the Post Offices and 
in some other public place in said Town, seven days at 
least before said fifth day of March, then and there to act 
upon the following Articles: 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot will be open 
at 12 o'clock noon and may be closed at 6.30 o'clock 
P.M. 

ARTICLE 1. To choose a Moderator. 

ART. 2. To bring in their votes for the following 
Town Officers, and any other officers required by law 



164 



to be elected by ballot or otherwise, also any committees, 
commissioners and trustees. 

Three Selectmen for one year. 

One member of the Board of Assessors for three years. 

One member of the Board of Health for three years. 

One Treasurer for one year. 

One Collector for one year. 

One Auditor for one year. 

Two Constables for one year. 

One Tree Warden for one year. 

One member of the Trust Fund Commissioners for 
three years. 

One member of Trustees for Free Public Lectures for 
three years. 

One member of the School Committee for three years. 

One member of the Board of Water Commissioners 
for three years. 

One member of the Board of Cemetery Commissioners 
for three years. 

Also to vote "Yes" or "No" upon the following 
question: "Shall licenses be granted for the sale of 
intoxicating liquors in this Town?" 

ART. 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committee, Commissioners and Trustees. 

ART. 4. To appropriate money for necessary and 
expedient purposes of the Town and enact anything in 
relation to the same. 

ART. 5. To determine the manner of collecting 
taxes for the ensuing year. 

ART. 6. To determine the compensation of the 
Collector of Taxes for the ensuing year. 



165 



ART. 7. To see if the Town will authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to 
borrow during the municipal year, beginning February 1, 
1917, in anticipation of the collection of taxes for the said 
year, such sums of money as may be necessary for the 
current expenses of the Town, but not exceeding the 
total tax levy for the said year, giving the notes of the 
Town in payment therefor payable in one year from the 
date thereof. All debts incurred under authority of this 
vote shall be paid from taxes of the present municipal 
year. 

ART. 8. To see if the Town will choose a Committee 
on Claims under the provisions of Section 3, Article 6 
of the By-Laws. 

ART. 9. To hear the report of the Selectmen in 
regard to changes in the By-Laws and enact anything 
in relation to the same. 

ART. 10. To see if the Town will extend the water 
pipes from I. X. MacRae's to a point opposite the house 
of Miss Carrie B. Chapin. 

ART. 11. To see if the Town will extend the water 
pipes from some point on the State or Virginia Roads to 
the house of Mr. Bert Pearson, and make an appropria- 
tion for the same, or take any action with reference to 
the matter. 

ART. 12. To see if the Town will extend the water 
pipes for 600 feet on the private way running easterly 
from the Depot Road between the new schoolhouse 
and the telephone station, and appropriate money for 
the same, or take any action with reference to the matter. 



166 



ART. 13. To see if the Town will take steps to dis- 
continue the lights on certain streets. 

ART. 14. To see if the Town will cause street lights 
to be installed on the road leading from the house of the 
Misses Chapin to the house of William C. Peirce, or 
take any action with reference to the matter. 

ART. 15. To see if the Town will pass such votes 
and take action which will enable the Town to elect 
its Board of Selectmen and Overseers of the Poor one for 
one year, one for two years, and one for three years. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT 

And make due return of this Warrant, with your 
doings thereon, to the Town Clerk at or before the time 
for the meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this seventeenth day of 
February, in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine 
hundred and seventeen. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



167 



By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Middlesex, ss. 

At the Superior Court, within and for the County 
of Middlesex, Anno Domini, 1897. 



The following By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln, in said 
County, are presented to this Court for approval, to wit: — 

"ARTICLE I. 

Town Meetings. 

Section 1. The annual town meeting shall be held on 
the first Monday of March in each year. 

Sect. 2. Notice of every town meeting shall be given by 
posting copies of the warrant calling the same, attested by 
the officer making service thereof, in each of the post-offices 
within the town, and in one of the churches, or one other 
public place, within the town, not less than seven days be- 
fore the day appointed for such meeting. But when, in the 
judgment of the selectmen, the interests of the town require 
a meeting to be held without giving so long a notice, a 
meeting may be called by posting attested copies of the 
warrant in the places above mentioned, and by leaving a 
printed copy thereof at each dwelling-house within the 
♦own, at least three days before the time appointed for the 
meeting; provided that in such cases the selectmen shall 
certify that, in their opinion, the interests of the town re- 
quire that a town meeting be called upon a notice of less 
than seven days, which certificate shall be made upon, or at- 
tached to, the original warrant, and shall be served as a 
part thereof. 



168 

ARTICLE II. 

Finances. 

Section 1. The financial year shall commence vrith the 
first day of February and end with the thirty-first day of 
January annually. 

Sect. 2. The town treasurer shall have the custody of 
all funds belonging to the town except sinking funds, trust 
funds and funds for which other provision is made by law; 
and he shall pay no money from the treasury except upon a 
draft signed by a majority of the selectmen, stating the ac- 
count to which the same is chargeable. Such draft shall be 
sufficient authority to the treasurer to pay the same, and 
the payment thereof shall discharge him from all liability 
on account of the money so paid. 

Sect. 3. The water commissioners and all other boards, 
committees and officers shall, on the first day of each month, 
pay to the town treasurer all sums collected by them thfc 
month previous to the custody of which the treasurer is 
entitled. 

Sect. 4. A majority of the water commissioners, school 
committee, or of any board, or committee, and any officer 
having charge of the expenditure of an appropriation, shall 
approve in writing all accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls 
properly chargeable to such appropriation, and shall trans- 
mit the same with his or their approval to the selectmen. 
All other accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls shall be ex- 
amined by the selectmen and, if proper, shall be approved 
by them. The selectmen shall label all accounts, claims, 
bills and pay-rolls which have been approved either by 
themselves or by the other officers before mentioned, and 
shall keep a record thereof in a book kept for the purpose, 
stating the persons to whom payable, the amounts and 
dates thereof, and the funds, or appropriations, from which 
the same are payable. 

Sect. 5. Drafts signed by a majority of the selectmen, 
stating the accounts to which the same are chargeable, 



169 

shall be drawn upon the treasurer for the payment of all 
Bums by law payable from the treasury to the common- 
wealth or county, final judgments of courts, bonds, notes. 
and scrip of the town and interest thereon and money pay- 
able to the commissioners of the sinking fund and to the 
trustees of the public library; and also for the payment of 
all accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls which have been 
approved in the manner provided in the previous section 
£uch drafts shall not be negotiated, but shall be trans 
mitted by the selectmen directly to the treasurer accom- 
panied by the approved bills or other documents for the 
settlement of which the drafts are drawn. 

Sect. 6. The treasurer shall file and safely keep all ap- 
proved and receipted accounts, claims, bills, and pay-rolls, 
and all vouchers, cancelled bonds, notes scrip, and otffer 
evidences of indebtedness of the town which have been paid 
from the treasury. 

Sect. 7. No draft shall be drawn by the selectmen un- 
less there is sufficient appropriation to pay the same, except 
for sums by law payable to the commonwealth or county, 
final judgments of courts, bonds, notes and scrip of the 
town and interest thereon, and money payable to the com 
missioners of the sinking fund. 

Sect. 8. The selectmen and treasurer respectively shall 
make a record, in a book kept for the purpose, of each ap 
propriation, with a list of the drafts drawn against such 
appropriation, and shall make a record of all bonds, notes, 
scrip or other evidence of indebtedness of the town, signed 
>r countersigned by them. 

Sect. 9. When the bills contracted or approved by any 
board, committee, or officer have exhausted the entire ap- 
propriation for such board, committee or officer, they shall 
incur no further expenditure, except in cases where such 
expenditure may be required by law; and it shall be the 
duty of each board, committee or officer before the close of 
the financial year to approve all accounts, claims, bills and 
pay-rolls chargeable to their appropriation. During the in- 



170 

terval between the thirty-first day of January in each year 
and the time of making the next annual appropriations, 
the selectmen, school committee and water commissioners, 
in order to meet the liabilities of their several dpartments, 
incurred in the carrying on of the work entrusted to them, 
shall have authority to make expenditures and payments 
from the treasury from any available funds therein, and the 
same shall be charged against the next annual appropria- 
tion. Such expenditure and liability incurred for any pur- 
pose shall not exceed one-fourth the entire amount appro- 
priated for that purpose in the previous year. 

Sect. 10. Unless the town shall expressly otherwise 
vote, no extension of water pipes shall be made unless be- 
fore the work of construction is begun one or more of the 
persons whom it is proposed to supply with water by means 
of such extension, shall file with the town clerk a bond with 
sureties satisfactory to the water commissioners, condi- 
tioned to pay to the town for five years next following the 
completion of such extension and the letting of water into 
the same, a sum sufficient, together with the net annual in- 
come from such extension, to amount annually to five per 
centum of the total cost thereof. 



ARTICLE III. 

Town Seal. 

Section 1. The design of the town seal shall be: a circle, 
in the border the words "Lincoln. Incorporated in 1746 as 
a precinct: in 1754 as a Town;" in the center, a shield, in 
the chief or upper part of which on a cross, gules, a fleur- 
de-lis, gold, from the old seal of Lincoln, England, and in 
the base of the shield a view of the present town hall ; crest, 
the old chestnut tree standing upon the common in Lincoln; 
In sal tire two shepherd's crooks; the device thereof being as 
follows: 



171 



Sect. 2. All deeds and other legal documents made, 
given or entered into by the town requiring a seal shall be 
sealed with the town seal, and signed in behalf of the town 
by a majority of the selectmen. 

Sect. 3. The town clerk shall have the custody of the 
town seal. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Records. 

Section 1. The town clerk shall record in full in a boo] 
kept for the purpose all written contracts, deeds and othei 
instruments to which the town is a party except such in- 
struments as may by law be recorded in the Registry of 
Deeds; and it shall be the duty of any board or officer exe- 
cuting or receiving such written contract, or other instru- 
ment, to deliver the same forthwith to the town clerk for 
the purpose of record. It shall be the duty of the town 
clerk to see that all conveyances of real estate to the town 
are properly recorded in the Registry of Deeds. 

Sect. 2. The town clerk shall keep a file of ^11 town re- 
ports, reports of all committees chosen by the tow~>, and all 
original documents relating to the affairs of the tow. which 
may come into his possession. 

ARTICLE V. 

Books. 

Section 1. Books, records and laws received by the town 
from the commonwealth shall be deposited in the public 
library building. 

Sect. 2. It shall be the duty of the town officer by whom 
any book mentioned in the preceding section is received, to 
cause the same to be at once deposited in the public library 
building. 

Sect. 3. Such books may be used by the inhabitants of 
the town within such building, and may be taken therefrom 
upon written receipt to the librarian for a period not ex- 
ceeding one day at any one time for use in any town meet- 
ing, or by or before any committee or official of the town. 



172 
ARTICLE VI. 

Suits and Controversies. 

Section 1. The selectmen may compromise claims and 
suits to which the town is a party, provided that they shall 
act upon the advice of counsel when the amount claimed by 
or against the town exceeds $200.00. 

Sect. 2. The selectmen shall have, unless it is otherwise 
voted by the town, full authority as agents of the town to 
institute and prosecute suits or other proceedings in the 
name of the town before any tribunal, to appear and repre- 
sent or defend the town before any tribunal in all suits and 
other proceedings against the town or in which the town 
has an interest, to employ counsel for the purpose aforesaid 
and for other purposes when it may be expedient to do so, 
and to take all necessary and proper measures for the pro- 
tection of the interests and rights of the town. 

Sect. 3. If the town shall, at any meeting called for the 
purpose, choose, a committee on claims, such committee 
shall have and exercise exclusively all the powers and 
duties conferred upon the selectmen by the two preceding 
sections. 

ARTICLE VII. 

Reports and Publications by the Town. 

Section 1. The annual reports of the town officers, 
boards and committees shall be prepared in form suitable 
for printing on or before the tenth day of February in each 
year. The selectmen shall cause such reports to be printed 
and distributed to the legal voters of the town seven days 
at least before the annual meeting. 

Sect. 2. The selectmen shall cause to be printed and 
bound each year with the annual reports of the town 
officers, boards and committees, a copy of the records of the 
town meetings during the preceding year; a statement of 
all devises, bequests and donations to the town during the 



173 

preceding year; a list of all laws of the commonwealth ac- 
cepted by the town during the year; all by-laws adopted by 
the town since the preceding annual report; copies of the 
laying out, alteration, locating anew or discontinuance of 
any highway or townway within the limits of the town dur- 
ing the preceding year; and a statement of all outstanding 
bonds, notes and obligations of the town for the payment 
of money. 

Sect. 3. The selectmen shall from time to time cause to 
be printed a sufficient number of copies of the by-laws of 
the town and shall incorporate therewith a list of the laws 
of the commonwealth which have been accepted by the 
town. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

Truants. 

Section 1. Any minor being an habitual truant, and any 
child between the ages of seven and fifteen years found 
wandering about the streets or public places within the 
town having no lawful occupation or business, not attend- 
ing school, and growing up in ignorance, and such children 
as persistently violate the reasonable rules and regulations 
of the public schools, may upon conviction thereof be com- 
mitted to the Middlesex County Truant School at Chelms- 
ford, Mass., or to any other place provided by the town 
within its limits, for confinement, instruction, and disci- 
pline. 

ARTICLE IX. 

Public Regulations. 

Section 1. No person shall coast upon any public street 
or part thereof after the selectmen have posted a notice 
prohibiting coasting upon such street or part thereof. 

Sect. 2. No person, unless authorized by law, shall 
break or dig up any part of any street without a written 
permit therefor from the selectmen. Every person who 



174 

after obtaining such permit shall obstruct or render unsafe 
any public street, shall guard the same by a proper fence or 
railing, and by lights during the night time, subject to the 
approval of the selectmen. Such permit may be revoked at 
any time. 

Sect. 3. No person shall be or remain in any doorway, 
or upon any stairs, doorstep, portico or other projection 
from any house or building, or upon or against any wall or 
fence on or near any street or public place, after having 
been requested by the owner or any occupant of the 
premises or by any constable or police officer to remove 
therefrom. 

Sect. 4. No person shall make, write, print, paint, cut or 
post any indecent or obscene marks, words, figures or signs 
upon any fence, building, post, tree or other object exposed 
to public view. 

Sect. 5. No person shall wilfully injure, mar, deface or 
destroy any fence, signboard, guideboard, lamp-post, lamp 
or lantern in any street or public place, nor extinguish any 
street light, nor extinguish or remove any light placed to 
denote an obstruction or a defect in any public street or 
way, without proper authority to do so. 

Sect. 6. Any person who shall offend against any of the 
provisions of this article shall forfeit and pay, for each 
offense, a sum not exceeding twenty dollars." 

Which said By-Laws being seen and understood by the 
Court, are on this nineteenth day of June, A. D. 1897, ap- 
proved. 

In testimony that the foregoing is a true copy 
of record, I hereto set my hand and affix the seal 
of said Court, this twenty-second day of June, 
A. D. 1897. 

RALPH M. SMITH, Ass't Clerk. 



175 



INDEX 



Page 

Town Officers, 1916 3-5 

Proceedings of Town Meetings, 1916 7-44 

Town Clerk's Report 45-49 

Recommendations for Appropriations 50-51 

Selectmen's Report 50-54 

Auditor's Report 55 

Expenditures for the year . . . 56-74 

Report of Assessors * 95-111 

Report of Town Treasurer 81 

Report of the Cemetery Commissioners 119-120 

Report of Town Treasurer in account Cemetery Commissioners . 121 

Report of Commissioner of Sinking Fund 82-84 

Report of Treasurer Commissioners Trust Funds .... 85-91 

Report of Treasurer Bemis Lecture Fund 92-93 

Report of Water Commissioners 112-118 

Report of Tree Warden 122-123 

Report of Board of Health 94 

Report of Supt. of Streets 78-80 

Report of Inspector of Animals 7.5 

Report of Fire Engineers 77 

Report of Trustees of Lincoln Public Library .... 124 

Library Statistics 126-127 

Report of Treasurer of Lincoln Library 125 

List of Accessions to Library 128-136 

School Reports . . 137-161 

School Expenditures 141 

Report of School Committee 139-140 

Report of Superintendent of Schools 142-156 

School Calendar and Statistics 159-160 

Roll of Honor 157-158 

Tabular Statement 161 

Warrant, 1917 163-166 

By-Laws of the Town 167-174 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 

OF THE 

Town of Lincoln 

FOR THE YEAR 1 9 1 7 

ALSO 

THE REPORTS OF THE 

SCHOOL and OTHER COMMITTEES 

FOR THE YEAR 1917 




BOSTON : 

Daniels printing company, printers 
77-79 washington street north 

1918 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 

OF THE 

Town of Lincoln 

FOR THE YEAR 1917 

ALSO 

THE REPORTS OF THE 

SCHOOL and OTHER COMMITTEES 

FOR THE YEAR 1917 




BOSTON : 

DANIELS PRINTING COMPANY, PRINTERS 

77-79 WASHINGTON STREET NORTH 

1918 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1917-1918 



Town Clerk. 
ARTHUR F. CHAPIX. 



Selectmen and Overseers of the Poor. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 

JOHX F. FARRAR, ROBERT D. DOXALDSON 

Board of Health. 

CHARLES E. CLARK Term expires 1918 

MART1X M. WELCH " " 1919 

R. D. DOXALDSOX " " 1920 

. tssessors. 

CHARLES S. WHEELER Term expires 1918 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE " 1919 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN ' M 1920 

Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 
CHARLES S. WHEELER. 

Auditor. 

JAMES W. LEXXOX. 

Constables. 
JOHX J. KELLIHEK. GEORGE E. CUNNINGHAM. 

Commissioners of Trust Funds. 

CHARLES S. SMITH Term expires 1918 

C. LEE TODD " " 1919 

JULIUS E. EVELETH " " 1920 



4 

Tree Warden. 
JOHN J. KELLIHER. 

Trustees for Bemis Fund for Free Public Lectures. 

EDWARD F. FLINT Term expires 1918 

C. LEE TODD " " 1919 

JULIUS E. EVELETH " " 1920 

Trustees of Grammar School Fund. 

CHARLES S. WHEELER, GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

JULIUS E. EVELETH. 

Trustees of Lincoln Library. 
GEORGE G. TARBELL, JOHN F. FARRAR, 

CHARLES LEE TODD. 
CHARLES S. SMITH, Chairman of Selectmen, ex-officio. 
ANTHONY J. DOHERTY, Chairman School Committee, ex-officio. 

Registrars. 
CHARLES S. SMITH, ROBERT D. DONALDSON. 

JOHN F. FARRAR, ARTHUR F. CHAPIN. 

School Committee. 

ELIZABETH BLODGETT Term expires 1918 

ANTHONY J. DOHERTY " " 1919 

AMOS R. LITTLE " " 1920 

Water Commissioners. 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN Term expires 1918 

JOSEPH S. HART " " 1919 

SUMNER SMITH " " 1920 



Field Drivers. 
MICHAEL J. BOYCE, WILLIAM E. WATSON. 

Fence Viewers. 
JOHN F. FARRAR, WM. H. SHERMAN. 

Surveyor, of Lumber. 
SAMUEL FARRAR. 

Measurers of Wood and Bark. 
SAMUEL FARRAR, JOHN F. FARRAR. 

Cemetery Commissioners. 

CHARLES S. SMITH Term expires 1918 

JULIUS E. EVELETH " " 1919 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 



Proceedings of a Town Meeting held March 5, 1917 

WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln, in 
said Countv : 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify the legal voters of said 
Town of Lincoln, qualified to vote at Town Meeting for 
the transaction of Town affairs, to meet in the Town Hall, 
in said Lincoln, on Monday, the fifth day of March next, 
at 11.30 o'clock A. M., by posting a copy of this Warrant 
by you attested, in each of the Post Offices and in some 
other public place in said Town, seven days at least before 
said fifth day of March, then and there to act upon the 
following Articles : 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot will be open 
at 12 o'clock noon and may be closed at 6.30 o'clock P. M. 

ARTICLE 1. To choose a Moderator. 

ART. 2. To bring in their votes for the following 
Town Officers, and any other officers required by law 
to be elected by ballot or otherwise, also any committees, 
commissioners and trustees. 



8 

Three Selectmen for one year. 

One member of the Board of Assessors for three years. 

One member of the Board of Health for three years. 

One Treasurer for one year. 

One Collector for one year. 

One Auditor for one year. 

Two Constables for one year. 

One Tree Warden for one year. 

One member of the Trust Fund Commissioners for three 
years. 

One member of Trustees for Free Public Lectures for 
three years. 

One member of the School Committee for three years. 

One member of the Board of Water Commissioners for 
three years. 

One member of the Board of Cemetery Commissioners 
for three years. 

Also to vote "Yes" or "No" upon the following ques- 
tion : "Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in this Town?" 

ART. 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committee, Commissioners and Trustees. 

ART. 4. To appropriate money for necessary and 
expedient purposes of the Town and enact anything in 
relation to the same. 

ART. 5. To determine the manner of collecting taxes 
for the ensuing year. 



ART. 6. To determine the compensation of the Col- 
lector of Taxes for the ensuing year. 

ART. 7. To see if the Town will authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
during the municipal year, beginning February 1, 1917, in 
anticipation of the collection of taxes for the said year, 
such sums of money as may be necessary for the current 
expenses of the Town, but not exceeding the total tax levy 
for the said year, giving the notes of the Town in payment 
therefor payable in one year from the date thereof. All 
debts incurred under authority of this vote shall be paid 
from taxes of the present municipal year. 

ART. 8. To see if the Town will choose a Committee 
on Claims under the provisions of Section 3, Article 6 of 
the By-Laws. 

ART. 9. To hear the report of the Selectmen in regard 
to changes in the By-Laws and enact anything in relation 
to the same. 

ART. 10. To see if the Town will extend the water 
pipes from I. N. McRae's to a point opposite the house of 
Miss Carrie B. Chapin. 

ART. 11. To see if the Town will extend the water 
pipes from some point on the State or Virginia Roads to 
the house of Mr. Bert Pearson, and make an appropria- 
tion for the same, or take any action with reference to the 
matter. 

ART. 12. To see if the Town will extend the water 
pipes for 600 feet on the private way running easterly 
from the Depot Road between the new schoolhouse and the 



10 

telephone station, and appropriate money for the same, or 
take any action with reference to the matter. 

ART. 13. To see if the Town will take steps to dis- 
continue the lights on certain streets. 

ART. 14. To see if the Town will cause street lights 
to be installed on the road leading from the house of the 
Misses Chapin to the house of William C. Peirce, or take 
any action with reference to the matter. 

ART. 15. To see if the Town will pass such votes and 
take action which will enable the Town to elect its Board 
of Selectmen and Overseers of the Poor, one for one year, 
one for two years, and one for three years. 

HEREOF FAIL XOT 

And make due return of this Warrant, with your doings 
thereon, to the Town Clerk at or before the time for the 
meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this seventeenth day of February, 
in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and 
>eventeen. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



11 

The return on the back of the Warrant is as follows : 

Lincoln, February 26, 1917. 

I have served this Warrant by posting an attested copy 
in each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad Station 
seven days before date of said meeting. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 
Constable of Lincoln. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant, the meeting was called 
to order by the Town Clerk and the Warrant read. 

Under Article 1, voted and chose Charles S. Wheeler 
Moderator. (Sworn.) 

ARTICLE 2. Thomas L. Giles and Thomas J. Dee 
having been appointed Tellers and Charles E. Clark and 
Herbert G. Farrar Ballot Clerks, were sworn. 

A package said to contain 300 Regular Ballots and 100 
School Committee Ballots was delivered by the Town Clerk 
to the Ballot Clerks and their receipt taken for the same. 

The Ballot Box, being found empty, was locked and the 
keys given to the Constable. 

At 12 o'clock noon, the polls were opened and remained 
open until 6.30 o'clock P. M. 

After the polls were opened it was Voted that when this 
meeting adjourns it do so to meet in Bemis Hall at one 
o'clock P. M. Saturday, March ten next. 

The total number of ballots found in the Ballot Box was 
77, which agreed with the Check Lists of the Tellers. 
There were no special School Committee ballots cast. 
After the ballots were counted and the results tabulated the 
ballots, together with the Check Lists, were sealed and 
placed in the Town Clerk's vault. 



12 

The following is the result of the ballot as announced 
by the Moderator at the adjourned meeting held March ten. 



Town Clerk.— 

Arthur F. Chapin, sworn, 
Blank, 



65 votes. 

12 " 



Selectmen. — 

Robert D. Donaldson, sworn, 
John F. Farrar, sworn, 
Charles S. Smith, sworn, 



55 votes. 
71 " 

71 " 



Assessor. — 

William H. Sherman, sworn, 

Scattering, 

Blank, 



64 votes. 

5 " 
8 " 



Treasurer. — 

Charles S. Wheeler, sworn, 

Scattering, 

Blank, 



66 votes. 

2 " 
9 " 



Collector of Taxes. — 

Charles S. Wheeler, sworn, 

Scattering, 

Blank, 



66 votes. 

2 " 

9 " 



Auditor. — 

James W. Lennon, sworn, 
Blank. 



71 votes. 
6 " 



13 



Constables. — 

George E. Cunningham, sworn, 
John J. Kelliher, sworn, 

School Committee, for three years. — 

Amos R. Little, sworn, 

Scattering, 

Blank, 

Water Commissioner, for three years. — 

Sumner Smith, sworn, 
Blank, 

Board of Health, for three years. — 

Robert D. Donaldson, sworn, 

Scattering, 

Blank, 

Tree Warden. — 

John J. Kelliher, sworn, 

Scattering, 

Blank, 

Cemetery Commissioner, for three years. 

Roger Sherman, 
Fritz Cunnert, 
Blank, 

Commissioner of Trust Funds, for three 

Julius E. Eveleth, 

Scattering, 

Blank, 



67 


votes. 


66 


tt 


50 


votes. 


8 


t* 


19 


a 


72 


votes. 


5 


tt 


63 


votes. 


2 


tt 


12 


<< 


66 


votes. 


4 


«< 


7 


tt 


32 


votes. 


41 


tt 


4 


a 


years. — 


64 votes. 


2 


n 


11 


a 



14 

Trustee for Bemis Fund for Free Public Lectures, 
for three years. — 

Julius E. Eveleth, 67 votes. 

Byron Lunt, 1 

Blank, 9 " 

Question. — 

Shall Licenses be granted for the Sale of Intoxicating 
Liquors in the Town? 

Yes, 14 votes. 

No, 55 " 

Blank, 8 " 

The meeting met as per adjournment. 

The Moderator read the result of the Ballot, and the 
officers not already sworn were sworn. 



The following officers were then chosen 



Field Drivers. — 

Michael J. Boyce. 
William E. Watson. 

Fence Viewers. — 

John F. Farrar, sworn. 
William H. Sherman, sworn. 

Surveyor of Lumber. — 

Samuel Farrar, sworn. 

Measurers of Wood and Bark. 

Samuel Farrar, sworn. 
John F. Farrar, sworn. 



15 

ART. 3. All of the Reports of Town Officers, Com- 
mittees, Commissioners and Trustees appearing in the 
printed Town Book were accepted. 

ART. 4. Voted and appropriated : 

For Schools $11,500.00 

Transportation for Children 4,000.00 

Support of Poor 500.00 

Highways and Bridges 12,000.00 

Library, the Dog Tax and 500.00 

Interest 500.00 

Cemeteries (fiom Cemetery Funds) 500.00 

Voted, That the Town Treasurer be authorized and di- 
rected to take $500.00 from the Cemetery Funds to meet 
current Cemetery expenses during the current year. 

For Board of Health 200.00 

Tree Warden 500.00 

Suppression of Gypsy and Brown Tail Moths 2,000.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses 5,000.00 

Hydrant and other Water Service 2,400.00 

Waltham Hospital, Free Bed 250.00 

Street Lamps 1,800.00 

Fire Department 100.00 

Payment of Schoolhouse Bonds 3,000.00 

Interest on Schoolhouse Bonds 360.00 

Payment of Water Bonds (from Water 

Works Income) 1,000 . 00 

Water Works Sinking Fund (from Water 

Works Income) 1,500.00 

Voted, That for any additional money required to pav 
interest on Schoolhouse Bonds, the Selectmen be author- 
ized to draw from money in the Treasury. 



16 

Subsequent to the appropriations shown above, the fol- 
lowing vote was passed : 

Voted,-. That the income of the Water Works be appro- 
priated for the current expenses of the Water Works. 

Voted, That the sum of $0.50 be appropriated with 
which the Selectmen shall investigate to what use and at 
what place the old schoolhouse can be used and report to 
the Town. 



ART. 5. Voted, To collect the taxes in the same way 
and manner as last year. 

Interest at the rate of 6% per year to be charged on all 
taxes not paid on or before Oct. 15. And the Collector 
is authorized to collect the tax of any person, after said 
fifteenth of October, either by distress or imprisonment. 

ART. 6. Voted, That the compensation of the Col- 
lector of Taxes be lj4% of the amount collected. 

ART. 7. Voted unanimously, That the Town Treas- 
urer with the approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby 
is, authorized to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the taxes of the municipal year beginning 
January 1, 1917, to an amount not exceeding the total 
levy for the said year, and to issue notes therefor, payable 
within one year. Any debt or debts incurred under this 
vote to be paid from taxes of the said municipal year. 



ART. 8. Voted, To pass over this Article. 



17 

ART. 9. Voted, That the whole matter of changing 
the By-Laws be referred to the Selectmen, with authority 
to confer with the Attorney-General's Office, and prepare 
a set of By-Laws which shall be practically in accordance 
with the present By-Laws, with suggested amendments 
passed at the last annual Town Meeting, the same all to 
be in accordance with the laws of the Commonwealth, and 
report to the Town at some future meeting. 

ART. 10. Voted, That the Water Commissioners be 
authorized to extend the water pipe from I. N. McRae's 
place to a point opposite the house of Miss Carrie B. 
Chapin, payment to be made from current income of the 
Water Works. 



ART. 11. Voted, That the Town extend the water 
pipe from a point near the house of Mr. McHugh on 
Virginia Road to a point on the State Road near the house 
of Bert Pearson and payment be made from the Water 
Works Treasury. 

ART. 12. Voted, To pass over this Article. 

ART. 13. Voted, That the whole matter be left to the 
Selectmen for such action as they may think best for the 
interests of the Town. 

ART. 14. Voted, To pass over this Article. 

ART. 15. Voted, That the vote already passed, by 
which the Town elects by Australian Ballot three Select- 
men for one year, be re-considered. 



18 

Voted, That at the Annual meeting in 1918 the Town 
elect by Australian Ballot a Board of Selectmen as follows : 

One for one year, 

One for two years, and 

One for three years, 
and that thereafter the Town elect each year one Select- 
man for three years. 

Voted, That the Selectmen so elected shall serve as Over- 
seers of the Poor. 

Voted, That this meeting do now dissolve. 

Attest : 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



19 



WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth yon are hereby re- 
quired to notify and warn the inhabitants of said Town 
who are qualified to vote in Primaries to meet in Town 
Hall, Tuesday, the Third day of April, l c )17, at Five 
o'clock P. M., tor the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the 
Nomination of Candidates for Delegate to the Constitu- 
tional Convention — 

Thirty-two Delegates at Large. 

Eight Delegates from Congressional District, Fifth Con- 
gressional District. 

One Delegate from Representative District, Thirteenth 
Representative District. 

All the above candidates are to be voted for upon one 
ballot. 

Each voter may vote only for Sixteen candidates at 
Large, Four candidates by Congressional District, and One 
by Representative District. 

The polls will be open from five to eight P. M. 



20 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting 
attested copies thereof seven days at least before the time 
of said meeting as directed by vote of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this twenty-fourth day of March, 
A. D. 1917. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 
Also : 

The return on the back of the Warrant is as follows : — 

Lincoln, Mar. 26, 1917. 
I have served this Warrant by posting an attested copy 
in each of the Post Offices, and one in the Railroad Sta- 
tion seven days before date of said meeting. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Constable. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant the meeting was called 
to order by a member of the Board of Selectmen, who read 
the Warrant and administered the oath to Thomas J. Dee 
and Charles E. Clark as Ballot Clerks and Thomas L. Giles 
and Herbert G. Farrar as Tellers. 

The polls were oponed at four o'clock P. M. and re- 
mained open until eight o'clock P. M. A total of 54 ballots 
was cast and this total agreed with the check lists of the 
Tellers. After counting the ballots, they were sealed and 
the result read in open meeting. It was then Voted to 
adjourn. 



21 



The result of the vote was as follows : — 



DELEGATES TO CONSTITUTIONAL CONVEN- 
TION.— 

DELEGATES-AT-LARGE.— 

Charles Francis Adams of Concord, 
George W. Anderson of Brookline, 
William G. Andrew of Somerville, 
Albert S. Apsey of Cambridge, 
Charles J. Barton of Melrose, 
John L. Bates of Brookline, 
Addison P. Beardsley of Boston, 
William H. Brooks of Holyoke, 
Walter A. Buie of Boston, 
Harvey S. Chase of Brookline, 
Charles F. Choate, Jr., of Southborough, 
Charles W. Clifford of New Bedford, 
George W. Coleman of Boston, 
Louis A. Coolidge of Milton, 
John W. Cummings of Fall River, 
Edwin U. Curtis of Boston, 
Samuel R. Cutler of Revere, 
Arthur W. DeGoosh of Boston, 
Daniel E. Denny of Worcester, 
Daniel R. Donovan of Springfield, 
George H. Doty of Waltham, 
Hugh P. Drysdale of North Adams, 
Frank E. Dunbar of Lowell, 
Samuel J. Elder of Winchester, 
Wilmot R. Evans, Jr., of Everett, 
Eugene N. Foss of Boston, 
Harry A. Garfield of Williamstown, 
Ralph W. Gloag of Boston, 
Gurdon W. Gordon of Springfield, 



42^ 


yotes 


9 


a 


3 


a 


29 


a 


28 


tt 


35 


a 


3 


a 


31 


a 


4 


a 


8 


(i 


32 


a 


30 


tt 


8 


tt 


37 


a 


24 


tt 


34 


a 


4 


tt 


3 


a 


5 


a 


8 


tt 


20 


tt 


1 


tt 


28 


a 


35 


a 


23 


a 


10 


tt 



22 



Matthew Hale of Boston, 12 

Arthur D. Hill of Boston, 7 

Walter S. Hutchins of Greenfield, 1 

Patrick H. Jennings of Boston, 9 

Lewis J. Johnson of Cambridge, 4 

Abbott Lawrence Lowell of Cambridge, 37 

Xathan Matthews of Boston, 35 

James T. Moriarty of Boston, 7 

Joseph C. Pelletier of Boston, 17 

Josiah Quincy of Boston, 17 

Clarence W. Rowley of Boston, 3 

John Weaver Sherman of Boston, 4 

James A. Stiles of Gardner, 3 

Moorfield Storey of Lincoln, 39 

Charles B. Strecker of Boston, 8 

Wendell Phillips Thore of Boston, 3 

Whitfield L. Tuck of Winchester, 3 

Joseph Walker of Brookline, 12 

David I. Walsh of Fitchburg, 20 

Robert M. Washburn of Worcester, 8 

Sherman L. Whipple of Brookline, 17 

Lombard Williams of Dedham, 8 

George H. Wrenn of Springfield, 5 

T. J. Dee, 1 

C. E. Clark, 1 

R. D. Donaldson, 1 



DELEGATE FROM THE THIRTEENTH REPRE- 
SENTATIVE DISTRICT 

William Wheeler of Concord, 1 vote. 

Attest : 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



23 

Lincoln, April 17, 1917. 
Winslow A. Eaton was this day sworn Special Police 
for the remainder of the year by 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

Lincoln, April 18, 1917. 
James Kenna was this day sworn Special Police for the 
remainder of the vear by 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

Lincoln, April 20, 1917. 
Lorenzo E. Brooks was this day sworn Special Police 
for the remainder of the year by 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

Lincoln, April 20, 1917. 
Isaac Langille was this day sworn Special Police for the 
remainder of the vear by 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

Lincoln, April 27, 1917. 
John F. Farrar was this day sworn Special Police for 
the remainder of the year by 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

Lincoln, April 30, 1917. 
William H. Harding was this day sworn Special Police 
for the remainder of the year by 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



24 

Lincoln, May 7, 1917. 
S. Rodman Snelling was this day sworn Weigher for the 
year by 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

Lincoln, May 7, 1917. 
Frank H. Cunningham was this day sworn Special Po- 
lice for the remainder of the year by 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

Lincoln, May 14, 1917. 
William H. Sherman was this day sworn Special Po- 
lice for the remainder of the year by 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Tozvn Clerk. 

Lincoln, May 24, 1917. 
Charles S. Wheeler was this day sworn Special Po- 
lice and Home Guard for the year ending March 1, 
1918, by 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

Lincoln, May 24, 1917. 
Hermon T. Wheeler was this day sworn Special Po- 
lice and Home Guard for the year ending March 1, 
1918, by 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

Lincoln, May 25, 1917. 
James W. Lennon was this day sworn Special Police and 
Home Guard for the year ending March 1, 1918 by 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



25 



WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To any Constable in the Town of Lincoln, in said County : 

GREETIXG: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you 
are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
the Town of Lincoln, duly qualified to vote in the election 
of State Officers, to assemble at Town Hall, on Tuesday, 
May 1st, at twelve o'clock, to give in their votes for the 
following delegates to the Constitutional Convention, viz. : 
There will be elected on one ballot sixteen delegates at 
large; four delegates from the Fifth Congressional Dis- 
trict; one delegate from the Thirteenth Middlesex Repre- 
sentative District, and any other delegates required by 
law to be elected at this meeting. 

All delegates enumerated above are to be designated and 
voted for on one ballot. 

The polls to be opened at twelve o'clock noon, and may 
be closed at eight o'clock P. M., and you are directed to 
serve this Warrant by posting an attested copy thereof in 
each of the Post Offices and one of the churches, or in 
some other public place, seven days at least before the 
day appointed for said meeting, and to make seasonable 
return thereof with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk. 



26 
HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

Given under our hands, this twenty-third day of April, 
in the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred and seventeen. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

Lincoln, April 24, 1917. 

I have served this Warrant by posting an attested copy 
in each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad Station 
seven days before the date of said meeting. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Constable. 



On the back of the Warrant is the following return : 

Lincoln, Apr. 24, 1917. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant the meeting was called 
to order by a member of the Board of Selectmen, who 
read the Warrant and administered the oath to Thomas 
J. Dee and Charles E. Clark as Ballot Clerks and Thomas 
L. Giles and Herbert G. Farrar as Tellers. 

The polls were opened at twelve o'clock noon and were 
closed at eight o'clock P. M. A total of 120 votes was 
cast and this total agreed with the check lists of the Tellers. 
After counting the ballots were sealed and the result of the 
ballot read in open meeting. It was voted that the meeting 
do then dissolve. 



27 

The result of the vote was as follows : 

DELEGATES TO CONSTITUTIONAL CONVEN 

TIOX 



DELEGATES-AT-LARGE.-^ 

George Francis Adams of Concord, 

( reorge W. Anderson of Brookline, 

Albert S. Apsey of Cambridge, 

Charles J. Barton of Melrose, 

John L. Bates of Brookline, 

William H. Brooks of Holyoke, 

Walter A. Buie of Boston, 

Charles F. Choate, Jr., of Southborough, 

Charles W. Clifford of New Bedford. 

George W. Coleman of Boston, 

Louis A. Coolidge of Milton, 

John W. Cummings of Fall River, 

Edwin U. Curtis of Boston, 

I )aniel R. Donovan of Springfield, 

Frank E. Dunbar of Lowell, 

Samuel J. Elder of Winchester, 

Wilmot R. Evans, Jr., of Everett, 

Eugene X. Foss of Boston, 

Matthew Hale of Boston, 

Arthur D. Hill of Boston, 

Patrick H. Jennings of Boston, 

Abbott Lawrence Lowell of Cambridge, 

Xathan Matthews of Boston, 

James T. Moriarty of Boston, 

Joseph C. Pelletier of Boston, 

Josiah Ouincy of Boston, 

Moorfield Storey of Lincoln, 

Charles B. Strecker of Boston, 



88 votes 


40 


n 


56 


a 


60 


it 


78 


a 


58 


n 


23 


'• 


70 


4 . 


53 


ti 


31 


.. 


66 


ti 


61 


a 


58 


a 


30 


a 


49 


ti 


67 


a 


45 


a 


26 


a 


47 


ti 


34 


n 


29 


i t 


65 


ti 


71 


a 


28 


" 


41 


" 


48 


ti 


96 


ti 


18 


a 



28 

Joseph Walker of Brookline, 
David I. Walsh of Fitchburg, 
Sherman L. Whipple of Brookline, 
George H. Wrenn of Springfield, 

FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT.— 

Chester W. Clark of Wilmington, 
John W. Daly of Lowell, 
Edward Fisher of Westford, 
Hamlet S. Greenwood of Lowell, 
James Wilson Grimes of Reading, 
H. Harding Hale of Hudson, 
William Odlin of Andover, 

THIRTEENTH MIDDLESEX REPRESENTATIVE 
DISTRICT.— 

Arthur T. Johnson of Weston, 17 votes. 

William Wheeler of Concord, 95 " 

Attest * 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



54 


(< 


50 


n 


28 


a 


56 votes 


29 


it 


53 


it 


48 


a 


40 


(i 


51 


a 


36 


a 



29 



Proceedings of the State Primary, held 
September 25, 1917 

WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby re- 
quired to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who 
are qualified to vote in Primaries to meet in Town Hall 
Tuesday, the Twenty-fifth day of September, 1917, at 
12 o'clock M., for the following purposes.: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the 
Nomination of Candidates of Political Parties for the 
following offices : 

Governor for this Commonwealth. 

Lieutenant Governor for this Commonwealth. 

Secretary of the Commonwealth, for this Common- 
wealth. 

Treasurer and Receiver General for this Commonwealth. 

Auditor of the Commonwealth, for this Commonwealth. 

Attorney-General for this Commonwealth. 

Councillor for 6th Councillor District. 

Senator for 5th Senatorial District. 



30 

Representative in General Court for 13th Representative 
District. 

County Commissioner for Middlesex County. 

And for the Election of the following officers : 

District Member of State Committee for each political 
party, for the 5th Senatorial District. 

Five Members of the Democratic Town Committee. 

Five Members of the Republican Town Committee. 

Delegates to State Conventions of Political Parties. 

All the above candidates and officers are to be voted for 
upon one ballot. 

The polls will be open from 12 M. to 8 P. M, 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting 
attested copies thereof seven days at least before the time 
of said meeting as directed by vote of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return with your doings 
thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this eleventh day of September, 
A. D. 1917. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 
A true copy. 

Attest : 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Constable. 



31 



Lincoln, Sept. 13, 1917. 
I have served this Warrant by posting an attested copy 
in each of the Post Offices, and one in the Railroad Sta- 
tion seven days before the date of said meeting. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Constable of Lincoln. 



Pursuant to the above Warrant the meeting was called 
to order by the Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, who 
read the Warrant and administered the oath to Thomas 
S. Giles and Thomas J. Dee as Tellers and to William H. 
Costello as Ballot Clerk. The polls were opened at 12 
o'clock noon and were closed at eight o'clock P. M. A total 
of 53 votes was cast and this total agreed with the check 
list of the Tellers. After counting, the ballots were sealed 
and the result of the ballot read in open meeting. It was 
voted that the meeting do then be dissolved. 



The result of the Ballot was as follows: 

FOR GOVERNOR.— 

Grafton D. dishing of Boston (R. ), 
Frederick W. Mansfield of Boston (D.), 
Samuel W. McCall of Winchester (R. ), 



4 votes. 

10 " 
39 " 



FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR.— 

Calvin Coolidge of Northampton (R.) 
Matthew Hale of Boston (D.), 



41 votes. 
4 " 



FOR SECRETARY.— 

Albert P. Langtry of Springfield (R.) 
Arthur B. Reed of Abington (D.), 



41 votes. 
4 ft 



40 votes. 


4 


a 


13 


votes. 


4 


tt 


27 


a 


35 votes. 


3 


a 


4 


a 



32 

FOR TREASURER.— 

Charles L. Burrill of Boston (R.), 
Humphrey O'Sullivan of Lowell (D.), 

FOR AUDITOR.— 

Charles Bruce of Everett (R.)> 

Elzear H. Choquette of New Bedford (D.) 

Alonzo B. Cook of Boston (R.), 

FOR ATTORNEY-GENERAL.— 

Henry C. Attwill of Lynn (R.), 
Conrad W. Crooker of Brookline (R.), 
Josiah Quincy of Boston (D.), 



FOR COUNCILLOR, Sixth District.— 

James G. Harris of Medford (R.), 36 votes. 

FOR SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex District.— 

Charles S. Smith of Lincoln (R. & D.), 39 votes. 

FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 

Thirteenth Middlesex District. — 

David G. Sheehan of Concord (D.), 6 votes. 

Benjamin Loring Young of Weston (R.), 41 " 

FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, Middlesex.— 

Walter C. Wardwell of Cambridge (R.). 40 votes. 

FOR STATE COMMITTEE (Fifth Middlesex Dis- 
trict).— 

Adelbert B. Messer of Concord (R.)> 35 votes. 

John F. Mitchell of Marlborough (D.), 8 " 



33 

FOR DELEGATES TO STATE CONVENTION.— 

FOR DELEGATES TO REPUBLICAN STATE CON- 
VENTION.— 

John F. Farrar of Lincoln, 35 votes. 

Robert D. Donaldson of Lincoln, 36 " 

William C. Rebus, 1 " 

FOR DELEGATE TO DEMOCRATIC STATE CON- 
VENTION.— 

Martin M. Welch, 2 votes. 

Anthony J. Doherty, 2 

FOR REPUBLICAN TOWN COMMITTEE.— 

John F. Farrar of Lincoln, 35 votes. 

Robert D. Donaldson of Lincoln, 32 

Harold S. Cousins of Lincoln, 30 " 

Chester H. Sherman of Lincoln, 30 " 

Charles S. Smith of Lincoln, 36 " 

FOR DEMOCRATIC TOWN COMMITTEE.— 

Martin M. Welch, 5 votes. 

Patrick F. Corrigan, 6 " 

Thomas J. Dee, 6 " 

Anthony J. Dohertv, 5 

C. Lee Todd, 3 " 

Attest: 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



34 



JURY LIST FOR 1917 
As prepared by the Selectmen of Lincoln 



Name P. 0. Address 

Adams, John, So. Lincoln 
Bamforth, Fred J., Jr., So. Lincoln 
Brooks, Lorenzo E., Concord, R. F. D. 
Calkins, James T., So. Lincoln, R. F. D. 
Clark, Charles E., Lincoln 



Occupation 



Corrigan, Patrick F., So. Lincoln 
Crook, Russell G., So. Lincoln 
Cunnert, Fritz, Lincoln 
Doherty, Andrew J., Jr., Lincoln 
Farnsworth, Charles P., So. Lincoln 
Farrar, Herbert W., So. Lincoln 
Farrar, John F., So. Lincoln 
Flint, Ephraim B., Lincoln 
Giles, Thomas L., So. Lincoln 
Gordon, Donald, So. Lincoln 
Johnson, Walter W., Lincoln 
Kelliher, John J., So. Lincoln 
Koch, Richard, So. Lincoln 
Laird, Ludwig \ T . A., Lincoln 
Lennon, James W., So. Lincoln 
McHugh, John E., Concord, R 
Xelson, John W., Lexington, R. 
Neville, James M., Lexington, R. F. D. 
Rice, Edwin B., So. Lincoln, R. F. D. 
Simms, John W., So. Lincoln 
Snelling, Howard, So. Lincoln 
Wheeler, Abner S., So. Lincoln 



Farmer 

Farmer 

Gateman 

Carpenter 

Clerk 

Sculptor 

Laborer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Carpenter 

Lawyer 

Farmer 

Tree Warden 

Mechanic 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Painter 

Farmer 

•Clerk 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



F. D. 

F. D. 



35 



Proceedings of the National and State Elections, 
held November 6, 1917 

WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To any Constable in the Town of Lincoln, in said Count} : 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants 
of the Town of Lincoln, duly qualified to vote in the elec- 
tion of State and County Officers, to assemble at Town 
Hall, on Tuesday, November 6th, at seven o'clock in the 
forenoon, to give in their votes for the following officers, 
viz. : Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, Secretary, Treasurer, 
Auditor, Attorney-General, Councillor (one), Senator 
(from the Fifth Middlesex District); (one) Representa- 
tive in General Court (from the Thirteenth Middlesex 
District) ; County Commissioner, and any other officer re- 
quired by law to be chosen in the month of November of 
the current year. 

All officers enumerated above are to be designated and 
voted for on one ballot, and also the following questions : 

QUESTIONS. 

Acceptance of the following Articles of Amendment 
submitted bv the Constitutional Convention : 



36 

Article of Amendment No. 1. 

The General Court shall have power to provide by law 
for voting by qualified voters of the Commonwealth who, 
at the time of an election, are absent from the city or town 
of which they are inhabitants in the choice of any officer 
to be elected or upon any question submitted at such elec- 
tion. 

Article of Amendment No. 2. 
ARTICLE XVIII. 

Section 1. No law shall be passed prohibiting the free 
exercise of religion. 

Sect. 2. All moneys raised by taxation in the towns 
and cities for the support of public schools, and all moneys 
which may be appropriated by the Commonwealth for the 
support of common schools, shall be applied to, and ex- 
pended in, no other schools than those which are conducted 
according to law, under the order and superintendence of 
the authorities of the town or city in which the money is 
expended ; and no grant, appropriation or use of public 
money or property or loan of public credit shall be made 
or authorized by the Commonwealth or any political divi- 
sion thereof for the purpose of founding, maintaining or 
aiding any school or institution of learning, whether under 
public control or otherwise, wherein any denominational 
doctrine is inculcated, or any other school, or any college, 
infirmary, hospital, institution, or educational, charitable 
or religious undertaking which is not publicly owned and 
under the exclusive control, order and superintendence of 
public officers or public agents authorized by the Common- 
wealth or Federal authority, or both, except that appropri- 
ations may be made for the maintenance and support of the 
Soldiers' Home in Massachusetts and for free public 



37 

libraries in any city or town, and to carry out legal obliga- 
tions, if any, already entered into; and no such grant, 
appropriation or use of public money or property or loan 
of public credit shall be made or authorized for the purpose 
of founding, maintaining or aiding any church, religious 
denomination or society. 

Sect. 3. Nothing herein contained shall be construed 
to prevent the Commonwealth, or any political division 
thereof, from paying to privately controlled hospitals, in- 
firmaries, or institutions for the deaf, dumb or blind not 
more than the ordinary and reasonable compensation for 
care or support actually rendered or furnished by such 
hospitals, infirmaries or institutions to such persons as may 
be in whole or in part unable to support or care for them- 
selves. 

Sect. 4. Nothing herein contained shall be construed 
to deprive any inmate of a publicly controlled reformatory, 
penal or charitable institution of the opportunity of reli- 
gious exercises therein of his own faith ; but no inmate of 
such institution shall be compelled to attend religious 
services or receive religious instruction against his will, or, 
if a minor, without the consent of his parent or guardian. 

Sect. 5. This amendment shall not take effect until 
the October first next succeeding its ratification and adop- 
tion by the people. 

Article of Amendment No. 3. 

The maintenance and distribution at reasonable rates, 
during time of war, public exigency, emergency or distress, 
of a sufficient supply of food and other common neces- 
saries of life and the providing of shelter are public 



38 

functions, and the Commonwealth and the cities and towns 
therein may take and may provide the same for their in- 
habitants in such manner as the General Court shall 
determine. 

The polls to be opened at seven o'clock A. M., and may 
be closed at four o'clock P. M., and you are directed to 
serve this Warrant by posting an attested copy thereof in 
each of the Post Offices and one of the churches, or in 
>ome other public place, seven days at least before the day 
appointed for said meeting, and to make seasonable return 
thereof with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk. 

HEREOF FAIL XOT. 

Given under our hands, this twenty-seventh day of 
October, in the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred and 
seventeen. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHX F. FARRAR, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON. 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

Lincoln, October 29, 1917. 

I have served this Warrant by posting an attested copy in 
each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad Station 
seven days before date of said meeting. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Constable of Line o hi. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant the meeting was called 
to order by the Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, who 
read the Warrant and administered the oath to Thomas J. 
Dee and Thomas L. Giles as Tellers and to William H. 



39 



Costello as Ballot Clerk. The polls were opened at seven 
o'clock A. M. and remained open until 6:30 P. M. A total 
of 152 votes was cast and this total agreed with the counter 
of the ballot box and the check lists of the Tellers. After 
counting the ballots were sealed and the result of the ballot 
read in open meeting. It was voted that the meeting do 
then adjourn. 

The result of the Ballot was as follows: — 

FOR GOVERNOR.— 

James Hayes of Plymouth, Socialist-Labor, 
Chester R. Lawrence of Boston, Prohibition, 
Frederick W. Mansfield of Boston, Dem., 
Samuel \Y. McCall of Winchester, Rep.. 
John McCarty of Abington, Sociali-t. 
Blank. 



FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR.— 

Calvin Coolidge of Northampton, Rep., 93 votes, 

Matthew Hale of Boston, Dem.-Proh.-Prog., 44 " 
Sylvester J. McBride of Watertown, Socialist, 1 
Fred E. Oelcher of Peabody, Socialist-Labor, 1 
Blank, 13 



FOR SECRETARY.— 

Herbert S. Brown of Greenfield, Prohibition, 4 votes. 

Albert P. Langtry of Springfield, Republican. 96 

Ingvar Paulsen of Boston, Socialist-Labor, 1 

Arthur B. Reed of Abington, Democratic. 43 

Marion E. Sproule of Lowell, Socialist, 2 

Blank, 6 






votes 


1 


tt 


42 


tt 


105 


a 


1 


" 


3 


<• 



40 

FOR TREASURER.— 

Charles L. Burrill of Boston, Republican, 98 votes. 

Solon Lovett of Beverly, Prohibition, 1 

Joseph A. Murphy of Lowell, Socialist, 2 

Humphrey O' Sullivan of Lowell, Democratic, 43 

Mary E. Peterson of Somerville, Soc. -Labor, 3 

Blank, 5 

FOR AUDITOR.— 

Elzear H. Choquette of New Bedford, Dem. 43 votes. 

Alonzo B. Cook of Boston, Republican, 88 

David Craig of Milford, Socialist-Labor, 1 " 

Walter S. Peck of Stockbridge, Socialist, 3 
Henry G. Smith, Jr., of Somerville, Prohibition, 3 

Blank, 14 " 

FOR ATTORNEY-GENERAL.— 

Henry C. Attwill of Lynn, Republican, 91 votes. 

Frank Auchter of Belmont, Prohibition, 3 

William R. Henry of Lynn, Socialist, 2 
Thomas J. Maher of Medford, Socialist-Labor, 

Josiah Quincy of Boston, Democratic, 49 

Blank, 7 " 

FOR COUNCILLOR, Sixth District.— 

James G. Harris of Medford, Republican, 106 votes. 

Blank, 46 " 

FOR SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex District.— 

Charles S. Smith of Lincoln, Republican, 132 votes. 

Blank, 20 " 



41 

FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 

Thirteenth Middlesex District. — 
David G. Sheehan of Concord, Democratic, 43 votes. 
Benjamin Loring Young of Weston, Rep., 101 
Blank, 8 " 

FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, Middlesex County.— 
Walter C. Ward well of Cambridge, Rep., 101 vote^. 

Blank, 51 " 

"Shall the following Article of Amendment relative to 
absentee voting, submitted by the Constitutional Conven- 
tion, be approved and ratified'" 

Yes, 95 votes. 

No, 22 " 

Blank, 35 " 

"In place of Article 18 of the Articles of Amendment of 
the Constitution, shall the following Article of Amendment 
relative to appropriations for educational and benevolent 
purposes, submitted by the Constitutional Convention, be 
approved and ratified ?" 

Yes, 92 votes. 

No, 45 " 

Blank, 15 " 

"Shall the following Article of Amendment relative to 
the taking and distribution by the Commonwealth and its 
municipalities of the common necessaries of life, submitted 
by the Constitutional Convention, be approved and rati- 
fied?" 

Yes, 97 votes. 

No, 18 " 

Blank, 37 " 

Attest : 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Tozvn Clerk. 



42 

At a meeting of the Town Clerks of the Thirteenth 
Representative District of Middlesex County, held at 
Concord, November 16, 1917, the vote for Representative 
in the General Court was determined as follows : — 



David J. Sheehan (D.) of Concord 251 43 17 85 24 420 

Benjamin Loring Young (R.) of Weston. 490 101 104 213 294 1202 

Blanks, 52 8 5 17 13 95 

Totals ■ 793 152 126 315 331 1717 



Two certificates of the election of Benjamin Loring 
Young of Weston were prepared and signed by the Clerks 
for transmission to the Secretary of the Commonwealth 
and to the Representative-elect. 

William D. Cross, Town Clerk of Concord. 
Arthur F. Chapin, Town Clerk of Lincoln. 
Frank F. Gerry, Town Clerk of Sudbury. 
Warren L. Bishop, Town Clerk of Wayland. 
Alfred L. dishing, Town Clerk pro tern of Weston. 

Attest: 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIX, 

Tozvn Clerk. 

Lincoln, Dec. 6, 1917. 

William H. Sherman was this day sworn Weigher for 
the remainder of the current year by 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



43 



There have been recorded during the year ending 
December 31, 1917, 20 Births, 13 Marriages, 23 Deaths. 

Births Registered 



Date 


of 


Birth 


Name of Child 


Names of Parents 


Feb. 


11. 


1912 


Andrews Clark. 


John T. and Zaidee F. Haines. 


Max- 


2, 


1916 


Doris Vadon. 


Marshall E. and Stella L. Cooper. 


May 


13, 


1916 


Richard Wheeler Baker. 


Richard W. and Doris Newberry. 


Aug. 


4, 


1916 


Eleanor Corrigan. 


Martin and Anna Dempsey. 


Sept. 


11, 


1916 


Richard Briggs. 


Richard. lr., and Alice E. Bi-bee. 


Nov. 


11, 


1916 


William Edward Costello. 


William H. and Ellen E. Gill. 


Nov. 


30, 


1916 


Ehha Pauline Nelson. 


Charles and Ada Peterson. 


Mar. 


6, 


1917 


Dorothea Howard. 


William L., Jr., and Rena Munder. 


Mar. 


22, 


1917 


Leo Lennon. 


Patrick J. and Mary J. MacDonald. 


June 


5, 


1917 


Fiari di Meo. 


Sam and Marie Granfelicio. 


June 


26, 


1917 


Entione Cook. 


George and Marian Buched. 


Fune 


28, 


1917 


Maria Santedicola. 


Nicassia and Francasco Diadoti. 


July 


11, 


1917 


Tony Campobasso. 


Dominico and Maria N. Sarino. 


July 


21, 


1917 


Clifford Norman Pederson 


Andrew and Sarah Holmes. 


Auk. 


25, 


1917 


Crawford Gordon. 


Donald and Louise R. Ayer. 


Auk. 


29, 


1917 


Emmons Malcolm Bowles 


William and Delia Davidson. 


Sept. 


18, 


1917 


Henry Rice Flint. 


Edward F. and Josephine If. Ritchie. 


Sept. 


22, 


1917 


William Michael Dean 


Harold S. and Emma Winnefred. 


Oct. 


7, 


1917 


Randolph Kelso Foreman 


Charles F. and Annie Limond. 


Nov. 


30, 


1917 


Thomas William Coan. 


Thomas F. and Anna A. Crowley. 



44 



Marriages Registered 



Date 


of Marriage 


Names 


Residence. 


Tan. 


1, 


1917 i 


John A. Laurie. 

Mrs. Louise Hardy (nee Harper). 


Lincoln. 
Lexington. 


June 


7, 


1917 t 


John Francis Kenna. 
Joannah Henri Walsh. 


Lincoln. 
Attleboro 


June 


9, 


1917 S 


Edward Mellen Stone. 
Edith Caroline Snelling. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


June 


12, 


1917 S 


Matthew Henry Doherty. 
Elizabeth Cannon Hunter. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


June 


18 


, 1917 S 


Robert Weir. 

Rose Harvey (nee Shaw). 


Lincoln. 
Arlington. 


June 


20, 


1917 1 


Alvin Bernard Carruth. 
Emma Fleming. 


Barrie 
Lincoln. 


June 


21, 


1917 S 


Earl Wainwright Kingsbury. 
Elsie Burgess Davis. 


Boston 
Lincoln. 


Aug. 


31, 


1917 f 


Clarence A. Doten. 
L. Letitia Ebbs. 


Lincoln. 
North Easton. 


Oct. 


17. 


1917 S 


Tames Francis Meyers. 
Mary Catherine Coan. 


Jamaica Plain. 
Lincoln. 


Oct. 


20, 


1917 ( 


Sumner Smith. 
Alice Paul Wiggin. 


Lincoln. 
West Acton. 


Nov. 


21, 


1917 J 


George William Page. 
Lucy Margaret Harvey. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


Nov. 


28. 


1917 S 


Sedric Herbert Massi. 
Theresa Geraldine Cahill. 


Natick. 
Lincoln. 


Dec. 


15, 


1917 j 


Richard Keith Conant 
Lily Roberts. 


Gloucester. 
Lincoln. 



45 



Deaths Registered 













Age 




Date of 


Death 


Name 






















Y. 


M. 


D. 


Jan. 


6, 


1917 


Nancy Loker (Moulton) Husted. 


84 


9 


1 


Jan. 


26, 


1917 


Francis Weston. 


78 


9 


16 


Mar. 


7. 


1917 


Elizabeth Cook. 


— 


7 


7 


Mar. 


S. 


1917 


Irene Alberta Elbert. 


40 


3 


5 


Mar. 


11, 


1917 


Ruth Howes Weston. 


82 


9 


20 


Mar. 


22, 


1917 


James Roach. 


? 


— 


— 


April 


1, 


1917 


— Kennedy. 


— 


— 


1 


April 


21, 


1917 


Gertrude Elizabeth Harris. 


6 


7 


26 


April 


21, 


1917 


William Harris. 


4 


5 


24 


April 


21, 


1917 


Mildred Ida Harris. 


3 


9 


24 


April 


21, 


1917 


Robert Harris. 


1 


10 


4 


April 


21, 


1917 


Ralph Norman Harris. 


— 


5 


22 


May 


3, 


1917 


Anna Hazen (Farrar) Giles. 


51 


8 


12 


May 


24, 


1917 


Ann E. (Stearns) Cousins. 


82 


3 


19 


May 


26. 


1917 


Anna Lothrop (Rodman) Snelling. 


76 


2 


20 


June 


14, 


1917 


Louis E. Cook. 


17 


3 


2 


July 


7. 


1917 


Richard T. Hennessey. 


24 


3 


2 


July 


28, 


1917 


George B. T. Cunningham. 


77 


3 


24 


Aug. 


19, 


1917 


Warren Kaiser Daley. 


17 


8 


19 


Sept. 


19, 


1917 


Grace E. (Brown) Beckett. 


68 





14 


Oct. 


10, 


1917 


Doris Cook. 


1 


4 


21 


Oct. 


30, 


1917 


Petronella (MacDonald) MacDonald. 


24 


5 


— 


Dec. 


22, 


1917 


Mary B. (Wells) Brooks. 


76 


3 


13 



46 



EXTRACT FROM THE REVISED LAWS, CHAP. 29, 
AS AMENDED BY CHAP. 280, ACTS OF 1912. 

Sect. 1. Physicians and midwives shall, within forty- 
eight hours after the birth of every child in cases of which 
they were in charge, mail or deliver to the clerk or registrar 
of the city or town in which the birth occurred a notice 
stating the date and place of the birth, giving the street 
number, if any, the number of the ward in a city, and the 
family name. Failure to mail or deliver the said notice 
shall be punished by a fine not exceeding twenty-five dollars 
for each offence. The notice required by this Section need 
not be given if the notice required by the following Section 
is given within forty-eight hours after the birth occurs. 

Sect. 6. Parents, within forty days after the birth of a 
child, and every householder, within forty days after the 
birth of a child in his house, shall cause notice thereof to 
be given to the clerk of the City or Town in which such 
child is born. 

Sect. 8. A parent, keeper, superintendent or other per- 
son who is required by Section 6 to give or cause to be 
given notice of a birth or death, who neglects so to do for 
ten days after the time limited therefor, shall forfeit not 
more than five dollars for such offence. 



47 



DOGS LICENSED IN 1917. 

There have been 113 Dog Licenses as follows: 93 Males, 
12 Females, 6 Spayed Females, 2 Kennels, for which the 
sum of $335.40 has been paid to the County Treasurer. 

There have been nine licenses issued since December 1, 
1917, and these will be included in the return made to the 
County Treasurer in June. 

There have been 35 Resident Hunters' Licenses issued, 
for which $29.75 has been paid to the Commissioners on 
Fisheries and Game. 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIX, 

Town Clerk. 



48 



Men in the Military Service of the United States 
from Lincoln, Mass. 



Bamforth, Ralphi 

Bradley, Phillips' 

Brooks. George \\ '. 

Cobb, Yeranusv 

Collins, Joseph . 
(Martin Coan ) 

Connair, John J. ' 

Crowell. Wendell DJ 

Cunnert, Charles* 

Danner, John » 

Davis, Edmund Russell- 

Eldredge. Arthur S., Jr.* 

Fleming. Irving R. | 

Foster. Percival Hy 

Farquhar. Robert. 

Giles. John F. 

Goodnow, Ralph H* 

Hart. Joseph S. 

Kenna, John F., 

Marston. Wilder F. 

Xash, Rev. Xorman B, 

Rocks. Charles' 

Rocks. Frederick AJ 

Ryan. Edward HJ 

Russell, George H* 

Seeckts, Albert* 

Snelling, Howard > 

Snelling, Samuel Wi 

Snelling, Harry Courtney 

Stevens. Harold R.« 

Tarbell. George G.- 

W'etherbee. Charles F. 

Chapin. Arthur F. 

*YVistrand. Corp. Clifford E. 
(Age 25 years. Came to 
Lincoln May, 1909. Regis- 
tered as a voter in Lin- 
coln. 1913. Left Lincoln 
Tune, 1915. Enlisted May, 
1917 in 71st Inf. X. V. 
X". G. Transferred at Spar- 
tanburg. S. C. to the 
105th U. S. A. Inf., Octo- 
ber. 1917.) 



U. S. Navy 

U. S. Navy 

104th Inf., Co. 1, 26th Div. 

Transport F592, English Service 

115th Engineers. Co. B. 

104th Inf., Co. I, 26th Div. 

104th Inf., Co. D. 26th Div. 

101st Inf., Co. M, 26th Div. 

U. S. Navy 

U. S. Xaval Reserves 

101st F. A., Bat. C, 51st Brig., 26th Div. 

101st U. S. Eng., Co. C, 26th Div. 

Camp Upton Aviation Field 

Canadian Mil. Hospital, English Service 

102nd Inf., Co. C. 26th Div. 

104th Inf.. Supply Co. 

Transportation Dept. 

Military Police, Co. B, 26th Div. Headq. 

104th Inf.. Co. D, 26th Div. 

American Army, Y. M. C. A. 

104th Inf.. Co. D, 26th Div. 

Military Police, Co. B, Headquarters 

119th Ambulance Corps. 105th San. Tr. 

Battery C, 317. F. A. 

U. S. Navy 

Y. M. C. A. 

101st F. A.. Bat. A, 51st Brig., 26th Div. 

U. S. Balloon Squad. Co. C. 

101st Supply Train, Co. C, 26th Div. 

U. S. Engineers. 26th Div. 

104th Inf., Co. I. 26th Div. 

Certified for Draft 

Enlisted after leaving Lincoln 



49 



COMMITTEE ON WAR EFFICIENCY 

Jan. 4, 1918. 
To the Board of Selectmen, 
Town of Lincoln, Mass. 

Gentlemen — 

1. The Committee on War Efficiency of the Public 
Safety Committee of Massachusetts is addressing this letter 
to all of the Boards of Selectmen of the towns within this 
Commonwealth. We desire to call to your attention as the 
responsible financial heads of your town, the general situa- 
tion arising out of the war. 

2. If you will call this matter to the attention of the 
Voters at the annual meeting, we believe it would serve a 
useful purpose in that it would bring to the attention of the 
citizens of your town the changed financial conditions oc- 
casioned by the financial needs of the National Govern- 
ment, emphasizing the fact that our real business from now 
on is to win the war, and even at great inconvenience all 
other matters must be made secondary to that one great 
object. 

3. Massachusetts must bear her share of the National 
burden, and under the apportionment of subscriptions for 
loans Massachusetts is expected to subscribe for her ap- 
portionment, which on the last two loans aggregated 
$369,000,000. She has over-subscribed for the portion of 
the first and second Liberty loans, and another war loan is 
expected to be offered within the next few months. 

4. W r ar taxation and Liberty Loans have had a pro- 
found effect upon the market for municipal bonds, and with 
further Government issues impending, municipalities will 
be confronted with the fact that they must pay much higher 
rates of interest than before. 



50 

5. It would not be wise for cities and towns to suspend 
at once the issue of bonds for every purpose, but we do 
urge that a conservative policy be adopted at the very be- 
ginning of the year in order that the competition between 
National Government and Municipal Bonds be reduced to 
a minimum, and that material and labor needed for war 
purposes may be utilized for this most pressing need. 

6. Money should be borrowed for construction pur- 
poses only to meet pressing necessities, and towns should 
avoid creating a demand for steel and other materials 
needed for war purposes. 

7. The heavy burden on the taxpayers is to be con- 
sidered as well as the burden on your town finances, but 
the main thing is to win the war, and we are confident 
your citizens will patriotically support your courageous 
American stand if the matter is made plain to them. 

8. We hope all the cities, towns and counties will act 
together in this important matter. 

9. At this time it is not possible to do more than sug- 
gest the general policy of conservatism in the matter of 
loans, but if the Committee can be of any assistance to 
you in bringing before your Town Government or your 
citizens the importance of this subject, we are at your 
service. 

10. The Committee would be glad to know the amount 
of town securities issued for the fiscal year 1917, with your 
best estimate of the minimum amount which you must 
issue during the year 1918. 

Yours very truly, 

WILLIAM A. GASTON, 

Chairman. 



51 



REPORT OF THE SELECTMEN 



The Selectmen present the following report for the fiscal 
year ending December 31st, 1917. 

The Board was organized by the choice of Charles S. 
Smith, Chairman, and R. I). Donaldson, Secretary. 

On the previous page von will find an up-to-date record 
of the men from Lincoln who are in the United States Mil- 
itary service. A splendid representation and proof that 
Lincoln is assuming her full share of responsibility in con- 
nection with the world war. 

Lincoln is an agricultural community, and we are re- 
minded by the cancellation stamp put on every Government 
letter that food will win the war. It is therefore the duty 
of those who are on the farm at home to spare no effort to 
produce all the food products possible. 

The Selectmen are glad to notice that there is this co- 
operative spirit, not only among the farmers, but also 
among all the ladies in the community, who are doing their 
full share in trying to make the soldier more comfortable. 
May we all during the progress of the war be minded to 
increase this work if possible. 

The following table gives the appropriations made by 
the Town during the year 1917, and the appropriations 



52 

recommended by the Board to be made at the next Annual 
Meeting: — 



The Selectmen 
recommend the 
following appro- 
Appropriations priations for the 
for 1917 ensuing year 


For Schools, $11,500.00 $11,000.00 


Transportation for Children, 


4,000.00 


4,000.00 


Support of Poor, 


500.00 


500.00 


Highways and Bridges, 


12,000.00 


11,000.00 


Library, the Dog Tax and 


500.00 


500.00 


Interest, 


500.00 


500.00 


Cemeteries ( from 


500.00 


500.00 


Board of Health, 


200.00 


200.00 


Tree Warden, 


500.00 


500.00 


Suppression of Gypsy and 






Brown Tail Moths, 


2,000.00 


2,000.00 


Miscellaneous Expenses, 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


Hydrant and other Water 






Service, 


2,400.00 


2,400.00 


Waltham Hospital, Free Bed, 


250.00 


250.00 


Street Lamps, 


1,800.00 


1,600.00 


Fire Department, 


100.00 


100.00 


Payment of Schoolhouse Bonds, 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


Interest, Schoolhouse Bonds, 


360.00 


840.00 


Payment of Water Bonds (to 






be taken from Water Works 






Income), 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


Water Works Sinking Fund (to 






be taken from W r ater Works 






Income), 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 



53 

Appointments 

The following appointments have been made during the 
year : 

Sealer of Weights and Measures, Matthew H. Doherty. 

Weighers of Coal, Hay, Grain and other Commodities, 
Roger Sherman, S. Rodman Snelling. 

Inspector of Animals, Martin M. Welch. 

Special Police, Lorenzo E. Brooks, Herbert G. Farrar, 
John F. Farrar, C. S. Wheeler, Isaac Langille. 

Forest Warden, John J. Kelliher. 

Ballot Clerks and Tellers at State and Annual Election, 
James W. Lennon, Thomas L. Giles, Herbert G. Farrar, 
Thomas J. Dee, Charles E. Clark. 

Janitor of Public Buildings and Caretaker of Public 
Grounds, Edward Bannon. 

At the last Annual Meeting the Town voted to have the 
Selectmen investigate in connection with the moving or 
otherwise disposing of the old schoolhouse in the center of 
the Town. From the investigation made, the Selectmen 
are of the opinion that the old schoolhouse should by no 
means be sacrificed by sale; but that the Town should take 
steps to increase its school facilities and conserve the value 
of this building. The Selectmen believe it would cost at 
the present time to build a building as good as the old 
school building can be made by thorough repair, $12,000 to 
$15,000. 

The Selectmen feel confident that the building can be 
moved to some location on the schoolhouse lot near enough 
to the present school building to be heated by the same 
plant, and that the total cost, except extensive changes are 
made in the interior arrangement, will not exceed $5,000. 
When so moved and renovated, the Selectmen think the 



54 

building will be practically as good as when it was first 
constructed, and therefore recommend that the Town au- 
thorize the Selectmen to have the building moved and put 
in condition for use by the School Committee. 

Finances 

The Town is in excellent financial condition at the pres- 
ent time, something which should occasion at least great 
satisfaction on the part of all tax-payers and citizens. 
Towns and cities that are obliged to do financing outside 
of what the tax levy will provide at the present time, are 
certainly in an unfortunate position, as evidenced by the 
appended letter from William A. Gaston. 

The issue of bonds on account of the construction of the 
new schoolhouse, which was originally $55,000, has been 
reduced by the annual payment of said bonds and by special 
appropriations which have been made to retire the bonds, 
to $6,000, and on account of the accumulated interest on 
$15,000, # which was appropriated in 1915 for the payment 
of said bonds, the net indebtedness on account of this 
issue is now about $5,600. 

It has been impossible for the Sinking Fund Com- 
missioners to purchase any of the schoolhouse bonds with 
the $15,000 appropriated up to date, as the holders of the 
bonds are unwilling to sell them at par. Nevertheless the 
fund is kept intact, drawing interest at the present time at 
4%, so that the Town has the money on hand for the re- 
tirement of the bonds, and their purchase will be made as 
soon as conditions are sufficiently favorable. 

For the last few years, such appropriations as have been 
made for the care of the Cemeteries have been made from 
funds in the hands of the Treasurer of the Cemetery Fund. 



55 

The Treasurer apparently has not taken the money from 
the Special Fund and transferred it to the General Fund, 
thus there has been an accumulation of the Cemetery funds, 
which amount to $1,821.22. The Selectmen recommend a 
vote by which a large part of this fund will now be trans- 
ferred from the Special Cemetery Fund to the General 
Treasury, in order that the votes of the Town heretofore 
made directing appropriations to be taken from that Fund 
may be re-imbursed to the Treasury. 

The outstanding bonded indebtedness on account, of the 
Water Works is, as reported by the Treasurer, $68,000. 
There is, however, a sinking fund of $21,706.75, which 
leaves a net indebtedness on January 1st on account of the 
Water Works of $46,293.25. The Treasurer reported 
cash in the Water Works treasury of $3,006.24, and un- 
collected water rates of $2,457.18, or a total available cash 
for the Water Works treasury of $5,463.42. 

If in the opinion of the Water Commissioners, part of 
this sum can be used, the Selectmen recommend that such 
part as is available for the present should be transferred to 
the General Treasury to reimburse the treasury for funds 
advanced to the Water Works a few years since and re- 
ported by the Treasurer, without interest as of January 1st, 
as $4,787.51. Apparently the finances of the Water Board 
are in better condition than at any time heretofore re- 
ported to the Town. 

The Treasurer reports cash in the treasury January 1st, 
$8,278.06, and uncollected taxes of $1,644.55, or a total of 
$9,922.61. 

There is, therefore, available cash in all departments in 
the hands of the Treasurer, $17,207.25. 



56 

Support of Poor 

Mother's Aid has been continued as during the previous 
year and also aid, as reported, to Andrew Kilfoy, a total 
expenditure of $405.00. 

Fire Department 

The Fire Department has been conducted during the year 
as heretofore. For a more detailed report, reference is 
made to the Report of the Fire Engineer. 

Tree Warden 

Report of the Tree Warden gives a full account of the 
work his department has accomplished during the year, 
with recommendations for the future. 

Silent Poor Fund 

The Silent Poor Fund has been drawn on for $10 dur- 
ing the year. 

Highways 

The highways during the year have been under the 
charge of the same Superintendent as in former years, Mr. 
William H. Sherman, and reference is made to his report 
for further information. 

The changes in the By-Laws which have been voted at 
previous meetings, have not been published for the reason 
that the Town apparently seems to be getting along very 
well with its present By-Laws, and the Selectmen think that 
no change at the present time is necessary or desirable. 

In conclusion, the Selectmen believe that all of the busi- 
ness of the Town has been conducted in an economical, and 
in the main, in a business-like manner; that the results 
obtained for the money expended have been as good or 
better than has been the case in previous years. 



57 

The citizens have all of the necessities and most of the 
luxuries that any community has; the tax rate has been 
low; the health of the people has been good, and the gen- 
eral conditions under which we live in this community are 
comparable with any similarly situated. 

The financial affairs of the Town are in excellent con- 
dition. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



58 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 

I have examined the Treasurer's Report, also the securi- 
ties of the town, held by the Treasurer, the securities of the 
town, held by the treasurer of the Sinking Fund, and exam- 
ined all vouchers held by same. I find all correct. 

Following is an account of the money paid by the Treas- 
urer on the Selectmen's approval. 

JAMES W. LENNON, 

Auditor. 



59 



SCHOOLS 



Payments 

Thomas Benner, Superintendent, $520.00 
C. S. Lyman, Superintendent, 360.00 
Hattie B. Heath, Teacher, 700.00 
Helen M. Bowker, Teacher. 700.00 
Helen C. Strong, Teacher, 670.00 
Helen P. Jones, Teacher, 360.00 
Letitia Ebbs, Teacher, 385.00 
Elaine Poole, Teacher, 270.00 
( iladys Tyler, Teacher, 420 . 00 
Georgianna F. Keith, Teacher, 220.00 
Jennie Wheaton, Teacher, 118.80 
Walter F. Bracket, Instructor, 275.00 
Abbie P. Smith, Sewing Teacher, 150.00 
Bertha Wilson, Cooking Teacher, 150.00 
Mrs. Letitia Doten, Substitute Teacher, 9.00 
Laura Hope, Substitute Teacher, 6.00 
Fannie Cutler, Substitute Teacher, 23 . 00 
Town of Concord, High School Tuition, 2,443.60 
Town of Concord, High School Tuition, Agri- 
cultural Department, 520.18 
City of Waltham, High School Tuition, 390.00 
Boston & Maine R. R., Student Tickets, 715.20 
L. E. Brooks, Student Tickets, 17.50 
Tames Farrar, Student Tickets, 2.16 



60 

John F. Farrar & Son, Driving School Barge, 

Herman T. Wheeler, Driving School Barge, 

Thomas J. Dee, Driving School Barge, 

Martin Sherman, Driving School Children, 

Doherty Garage, Transportation of Children, 

National Express Co., Express, 

Boston & Maine R. R., Freight, 

H. A. Wood, M. D., Professional Services, 

Hattie B. Heath, Taking School Census, 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co., Services of Telephone, 3.35 

Waltham District Nursing Assn., Nurse, 

Lincoln Water Commissioners, Water Service, 

C. S. Smith, Coal, 

Roger Sherman, Removing Ashes, 

E. R. Farrar, 1 Cord Wood, 

T. J. Dee, Taking Barge to Concord, 

Thomas Benner, Postage, 

Helen P. Jones, Carfares to Waltham, 

William Costello, Carfares, 

William E. Chute, Janitorship of South School, 

M. L. Snelling, Coal, 

M. H. Doherty, Truant Officer, 

W. C. Peirce, Vegetables, 

Dorothy B. Marsh, Teaching Garden Work, 

C. S. Lyman, Expenses, 

E. Howard Clock Co., Repairs on Clock, 

John Macomber, Repairs on Barge, 

John A. Burgess, Repairs on Barge, 

Daniel McAskill, Repairs on Barge, 

T. J. McGann, Repairs on Barge, 

I. N. McRae, Labor and Supplies, 
R. D. Donaldson, Labor and Supplies, 
Langille Bros., Labor and Supplies, 

II. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 



372 


.50 


798 


.20 


652 


.50 


119 


.00 


1,472 


.63 


3 


.24 


2.25 


200.00 


10.00 


e, 3 


.35 


2 


.00 


55 


.00 


417.35 


10.45 


7 


.00 


5 


.00 


12 


.89 


41 


.70 




.70 


106 


.20 


23 


.75 


15 


.00 


1 


.35 


3. 


00 


9.46 


7. 


00 


13. 


50 


30. 


00 


28.00 


1. 


50 


66. 


70 


54. 


54 


4. 


46 


3. 


10 



61 



South Lincoln Dairy Co., Supplies, 9.70 

A. R. McLeod, Supplies, 40.61 

Chandler & Barber, Supplies, 20.38 

National Survey Co., Supplies, 2.50 

E. E. Babb Co., Supplies, 196.44 

Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 50. 11 

Palmer & Barber, Supplies, 43 . 76 

Jordan Marsh Co., Supplies, 42.60 

Lincoln Dillaway Co., Supplies, 13.63 

Rosins Talking- Machine Co., Supplies, 8.25 

Wright & Ditson, Supplies, 18.09 

Curtis Standard Research Co., Supplies, 4.34 

George Crosby Co., Supplies, 7.25 

Board of Education, Supplies, 2.70 

Ideal School Supply Co., Supplies, 1.69 

World Book Co., Supplies, 18.12 

Bertha Wilson, Supplies, 3.90 

Asahel Wheeler Co., Supplies, 6.50 

Robert S. Osterhault, Supplies, 3.20 

H. I. Dalliman Co., Supplies, 9.00 

Edward Bannon, Janitorship of Center School, 500.00 



$14,981.53 



62 
HIGHWAYS 

Payments 

William H. Sherman, Services as Superinten- 
dent of Streets, $1,269.70 

Timothy A. Hearn, Labor, 823 . 50 

Joseph Mahan, Labor, 621.25 

William H. Ryan, Labor, 615.75 

Patrick Cra\ r en, Labor, • 354.13 

J. W. Rooney, Labor, 572.75 

T. J. Crowley, Labor, 560.50 

M. J. Rooney, Labor, 182.50 

C. P. Farnsworth, Care of Horses at Stable, 260.00 

Daniel McAskill, Shoeing and Repairing, 89.05 

J. A. Burgess, Shoeing and Repairing, 319.35 

William Stearns, Repairs, 2.50 

Boston & Maine R. R., Freight, 427.65 

National Express Co., Express, 2.03 

Ashley Cousins, Labor, 11.00 

Daniel Holman, Labor, 25.25 

John D. Fleming, Labor, 5 . 00 

John Macomber, Repairs, 48.00 

Winchester Crushed Stone Co., Stone, 351.63 

Daniel E. Sherman, Hay, 145.23 

B. W. Brown Co., Grain, 1,175.48 

F. H. Cunningham, Labor with men and team, 282.27 
John F. Farrar & Son, Labor with Men and Team, 22.50 

Howard Snelling, Labor with Men and Team, 5 . 00 
George E. Cunningham, Labor with Men and Team, 25.00 

E. J. Hunter, Labor with Men and Team, 5.00 

Frank O'Brien, Labor with Men and Team, 21.00 
Hermon T. Wheeler, Labor with Men and Team, 3 .00 



63 



Andrew J. Dougherty, Labor with Men and Team, 37.25 

Moth Department, Wagon, 78 . 00 

James E. Baker, Hay, 187.15 

John F. Farrar & Son, Straw, 14.62 

John A. Finigan, Standing Grass, 71.75 

J. S. Hart, M. D., Rent of Stable, 1917, 125.00 
Estella Brooks, Rent of Land for Crusher, 1917, 25.00 

Town of Maynard, Use of Steam Roller, 192.00 

Lincoln Water Works, .Water at Barn, 12.00 

Lincoln Water Works, Water at Crusher, 10.00 
Barrett Mfg. Co., Tarvia, 2,901.28 

Mass. Broken Stone Co., Crushed Stone, 620.82 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 13.74 

New England Road Machine Co., Supplies, 35.40 

Lexington Lumber Co., Supplies, 119.52 

B. B. McKinn Co., Supplies, 14.16 

Benjamin Pike, Supplies, 8.75 

David Farquhar, Sign, 2.50 

Edson Mfg. Co., Supplies, 2.60 

Xew England Metal Culvert Co., Supplies, 68.00 

Peter Berry, Supplies, 32.45 

Standard Oil Co., Road Oil, 462.59 

Mrs. M. A. Sherman, Sand and Gravel, 54.85 

Mrs. Morrissey, Gravel, 48.00 

Herbert W. Farrar, Gravel, 7.50 

Flint Bros., Gravel, 65.00 

George Hill, Gravel, 26.25 

Leo Gaffey, Sand, 7.00 

George L. Cousins, Sand and Gravel, 9.50 

M. L. Snelling, Teaming Gravel, 10.00 

$13,488.70 



64 
WATER 

Payments 

Jas. T. Laird, Services as Supt. and Engineer, 

1917, $1,144.00 

Jas. T. Laird, Services of Truck, 84.70 

Jas. T. Laird, Storing Wagon, 20.00 

Jas. T. Laird, Collecting Water Tax, 183.00 

National Express Co., Express, 5.82 

Boston & Maine R. R., Freight, 2.45 

Edison Electric Ill'g Co., Power and Light, 1,280. 50 

Town of Concord, Pipe, 318.36 

Waltham Coal Co., Coal, 12.00 
New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Services of Telephone, 36.24 

D. L. Hamilton, Framing Pictures, 3.75 

William Johnson, Professional Services, 26.00 

W. F. Shackley & Son, Supplies, 21 .76 

Sumner Smith, Gasolene, 1.20 

Sumner Smith, Rubber Boots, 4.00 

Sumner Smith, Cash Paid to Laborers, 113.70 

Sumner Smith, Cash Paid to Fritz Cunnert, 16.40 

Sumner Smith, Labor at Pumping Station, 2.45 

Sinking Fund Commrs., Sinking Fund, 1,500.00 

C. S. Wheeler, Treas., Coupons due March 1, 797.50 

Sumner Smith, Services as Water Commr., 75.00 

Wm. H. Sherman, Services as Water Commr., 75.00 

Town Treas., Coupons, due Nov. 1st, 87.50 

Town Treas., Coupons, due Dec. 1st, 402.50 

Town Treas., Coupons, due May 1st, 87.50 

Town Treas., Coupons, due June 1st, 602.50 

Thomas E. Coburn Est, Labor, 4.00 

William C. Peirce, Rent of Land to July, 1918, 5 . 00 

Daniels Printing Co., Printing, 9.50 



65 



State Treas., Interest on Bonds, 

State Treas., Coupons, 

State Treas., 2 $500 Bonds, 

P. H. Graves & Son, Furniture, 

Martin M. Welch, Trimming Shrubs, 

Waltham Forge, Repairs, 

Frank Cunningham, Labor of Men and Truck, 

J. A. Higgins, Supplies, 

C. S. Forristall, Supplies, 

Wilson Lumber Co., Supplies, 

Thomas Groom & Co., Supplies, 

Wadsworth Howland Co., Supplies, 

Langelle Bros., Labor and Supplies, 

Chapman Valve Co., Supplies, 

Walworth Mfg. Co., Supplies, 

National Meter Co., Supplies, 

Chad wick Boston Lead Co., Supplies, 

Fagle Oil & Supply Co., Supplies, 

Rumsey Pump Co., Supplies, 

Edson Mfg. Co., Supplies, 

E. D. Gregorio, Labor, 

Dan McAskill, Labor, 

George Winslow, Labor and Supplies, 

Water Commrs., Box Rent, 

Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 

Doherty Garage, Auto Hire, 

Andrew J. Dougherty, Reading Meters, etc., 

Isaac X. McRae, Labor and Supplies, 



52 


.50 


745 


.00 


• 1,000 


.00 


13 


.50 


2 


.50 


1 


.25 


494.28 




.95 


62 


.76 


1 


.75 


3 


.33 


1 


.80 


6.44 


151 


.54 


237 


.58 


24.95 


15, 


.38 


27.78 


43.95 


2.93 


94. 


.15 


8, 


.15 


11. 


86 




75 


2. 


57 


5.99 


54.00 


69. 


17 


$10,059. 


14 



66 
MOTH 



Payments 

John J. Kelliher, Services as Superintendent, $910.00 

John J. Kelliher, Use of Truck, 137 . 00 

James Ryan, Labor, 666.00 

Fritz Cunnert, Labor, 326.00 

John Connair, Labor, 263 . 75 

Ashley Cousins, Labor, 371.01 

Byron Lunt, Labor, 111.25 

J. J. Moynihan, Labor, 301.13 

M. Connors, Labor, 42.00 

Andrew Doherty, Labor, 40.00 

Frank O'Brien, Labor, 48.00 

George Burrows, Labor, 26.00 

Frank Curran, Labor, 14.00 

Henry Sullivan, Labor, 26.00 

Frank Sullivan, Labor, 24.00 

Harold Rocks, Labor, 7 . 50 

Highway Dept., Storing Sprayer, 25.00 

John Macomber, Repairs, 2 . 50 

Xew Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Telephone Service, 17.08 

National Express Co., Express, 2.97 

Boston & Maine R. R., Freight, 1.15 

Torrey & \ alii, Repairs, 1.40 

Frost Insecticide Co., Supplies, 2.66 

Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 1.17 

State Forestry Office, Supplies, 137.07 

Standard Oil Co., Supplies, 80.00 

Doherty' s Garage, Supplies, 14.58 

Langelle Bros., Filing Saws, 1.14 

Andrew Dougherty, Teaming, 175.50 

John F. Farrar & Son, Teaming, 104.00 



67 

M. L. Snelling, Teaming, 35.50 

II. S. Cousins Co., Supplies, 1.19 



$3,916.55 
Credit Private Work, 2,178.99 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Payments. 

Edward Bannon, Care of Public Buildings, 

New Erig. Tel. & Tel. Co., Services of Telephone, 

Charles S. Wheeler, Abatement of Poll-lax, 

1916, 
Thomas Groom & Co., Supplies, 
W. & L. E. Gurley, Supplies, 
Leroy Basley, Labor, 
George J.. Chapin, Insurance, 
Doherty Garage, Auto Hire, 
C. S. Wheeler, Collecting Taxes, 1915, 
Edison Electric Ill'g Co., Light, Hall, 
Martin M. Welch, Inspecting Cattle, 
Herbert G. Farrar, Services at Elections, 
Thomas G. Giles, Services at Elections, 
Thomas J. Dee, Services at Elections, 
Charles Clark, Services at Elections, 
George Cunningham, Services as Constable, 
John J. Kelliher, Services as Constable, 
William Costello, Services at Election, 
Thomas L. Giles, Services at Enrollment, 
George E. Crosby Co., Printing, 
P. B. Murphy, Printing, 
L. E. P>rooks, Special Police, 1916, 



$508 


.26 


41 


.25 


50.40 


36 


.75 


22 


.15 


1 


.80 


39 


.79 


13 


.50 


923 


.07 


69 


.75 


17 


.96 


8.00 


20.00 


20.00 


12.00 


8, 


.00 


4 


.00 


8, 


.00 


6.00 


486, 


.50 


2, 


.70 


10 


.00 



68 

John J. Kelliher, Services as Constable, 106.00 

John Connair, Labor at Fire, 2.80 

J. J. Moynihan, Labor at Fire, 2.80 

Matthew F. Dougherty, Labor at Fires, 2.40 

Herman T. Wheeler, Labor at Fire, 1 . 00 

William C. Robus, Labor at Fire, 2.40 

S. Wheeler, Abatement of Taxes — F. 

•O'Brien, 2.16 

Lexington Flag Pole Co., Labor on Flag Pole, 75.00 

John J. Kelliher, Court Fees, 11.45 

C. S. Wheeler, Cash Paid Discount on Note, 50.81 

George Cunningham, Services as Constable, 

1916, 28.00 

J. O. Tilton, M. D., Returning Birth, .25 

Johnston & Xorth, Legal Service, Town-via- 

Bradstreet, 150.00 

A. J. Dohertv, Legal Service, Town-via-Brad- 

street, 50.00 

W. H. Sherman, Services as Assessor, 1917, 50.00 

W. C. Peirce, Services as Assessor and Copy- 
ing, 75.00 
C. S. Wheeler, Services as Assessor and 

Postage, 
Xational Express Co., Express, 
Thomas J. Dee, Labor at Fires and Storing 

Apparatus, 
Isaac McRae, Labor at Fires, 
C. S. Smith, 44y 4 Tons Coal @ $7 . 50, 
Arthur F. Chapin, Services as Clerk, Registrar 

and Postage, 
Waltham Publishing Co., Printing, 
Isaac Langelle, Services as Special Police, 1916, 
C. S. Wheeler, Insurance, Town Teams, 
Hobbi & Warren, Supplies, 
Library Bureau, Supplies, 



51 


.50 


2 


.86 


18 


.60 


72 


.56 


331 


.88 


120.00 


4 


.75 


33 


.00 


12, 


. 50 


7, 


.19 




.75 



69 

C. S. Wheeler, Premiums on Bonds, 

C. S. Smith, 45.45 Tons Coal @ $7.60, 

C. S. Forristall, Labor on Hall, 

C. S. Forristall, Labor on School House, 

C. S. Smith, Services as Selectman, Overseer, 

Registrar and Postage, 
John F. Farrar, Services as Selectman, Over- 
seer and Registrar, 
Robert Donaldson, Services as Selectman, 

Overseer and Registrar, 
John F. Farrar, Special Police, 1917, 
William C. Peirce, Services of Truck Wagon, 
John Tasker, Expenses Paid, May 30, 
C. S. Wheeler, Abatement of Taxes — Veteran 

Act, 22.00 

C. S. Wheeler, Abatement of Taxes — J. P. 

Brennan, 105.50 

C. S. Wheeler, Services as Treasurer, 310.95 

Highway Department, Teaming Coal, 100.00 

AT. H. Doherty, Services as Sealer of Weights 

and Measures, 40.00 

Edwin Bannon, Cutting Wood, 3.30 

Jas. W. Lennon, Services as Auditor, 1917, 125.00 



165 


.00 


345 


.42 


163 


.09 


192 


.74 


217 


.75 


200.00 


200 


.00 


10 


.00 


5, 


.00 


2. 


97 



Total, $5,897.56 



LINCOLN LIBRARY 



John F. Farrar, Treas., Appropriation, $500.00 

John F. Farrar, Dog Tax Returned, 300.00 

Total, $800.00 



70 



STREET LIGHTS 









Payments 




Edison 


Electric 


Co., 


Light for Dec, 1916, 


$144.02 


Edison 


Electric 


Co., 


Light for Jan., 1917, 


148.81 


Edison 


Electric 


Co., 


Light for February, 


136.63 


Edison 


Electric 


Co., 


Light for March, 


136.51 


Edison 


Electric 


Co., 


Light for April, 


137.25 


Edison 


Electric 


Co., 


Light for May, 


133.21 


Edison 


Electric 


Co., 


Light for June, 


129.65 


Edison 


Electric 


Co., 


Light for July, 


129.65 


Edison 


Electric 


Co., 


Light for September, 


133.71 


Edison 


Electric 


Co., 


Light for October, 


140.87 


Edison 


Electric 
Total, 


Co., 


Light for November, 


145.80 




$1,516.11 



INTEREST ON SCHOOLHOUSE BONDS, 1917 



Payment 

Cbas. S. Wheeler, Treas., Semi-Annual Int., 

due Jan. 1, $900.00 



PAYMENT ON SCHOOLHOUSE BONDS, 1917 



Payment 

Chas. S. Wheeler, Treas., Payment of Three 

Bonds, $3,000.00 



71 
MOTHERS' AID AND SUPPORT OF POOR 



Payments 



Mrs. Agnes Gilbert, Mothers' Aid, from Jan. 

15 to Dec. 15, $180.00 

Jos. B. Hart, M. D., Attendance to James 

Roach, 10.00 

State Board of Charity, Care of Andrew 

Kilfov. 215.00 



$405.00 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Payment 
M. M. Welch. Inspecting Meat, $125.25 



[NTEREST ACCOUNT, 1917 



Payments 

First Xat'l Bank, Interest, $26.29 

Estabrook & Co., Interest on $20,000, 544.44 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Certificates, 

Two Notes, 4.00 

$574.73 



72 
PAYMENT OF BORROWED MONEY 



Payment 
First National Bank, Payment, 3 Notes, $25,000.00 



HYDRANTS AND OTHER WATER SERVICE 



Payments 

Lincoln Water Commrs., 124 Hydrants, $1,860.00 

Lincoln Water Commrs., Water Service, Hall, 50.00 

Lincoln Water Commrs., Watering Troughs, 572.81 



$2,482.81 



CEMETERY 



Payments 

Robert D. Donaldson, Labor and Supplies, $13.97 

New England Nurseries Co., Shrubs, 4.70 

Lincoln Water Commrs., Water Service, 20.00 

John F. Farrar & Son, Labor, 9 . 00 

Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 20.45 

Roger Sherman, Labor, 223.50 

Fritz Cunnert, Labor, 1 1 7 . 00 

Fritz Cunnert, Sharpening Lawn Mower, 1.25 

Fritz Cunnert, One Bag Fertilizer, 2.60 

$412.47 



73 



WALTHAM HOSPITAL 



Payment 
Waltham Hospital, Appropriations, $250.00 



FIRE DEPARTMKXT 



Payments 



American La France Fire Engine Company, 

Supplies, 
H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 
Winslow Eaton, Care of Hose, etc., 
Langelle Bros., Labor and Supplies, 
National Express, Express, * 
Doherty Garage, Storing Truck, 
Doherty Garage, Labor and Supplies, 
Badger Fire Extr. Co., Supplies, 
Salary of 33 Firemen, 



Total, $376.45 



$29.19 


59.06 


8.00 


7.28 


.72 


100.00 


95.80 


10.60 


66.00 



74 



RECAPITULATION 



Payments 

Schools. $14,981.53 

Highways, 13,488.70 

Water, 10,059.14 

Borrowed Money, 25,000.00 

Miscellaneous, 5,897.56 

Moths, 3,916.55 

Payment of Schoolhouse Bonds, 3,000.00 

Hydrants and Other Water Service, 2,482.81 

Street Lights, 1,516.11 

Interest. 574.73 

Interest on Schoolhouse Bonds, 900.00 

Lincoln Library, 800.00 

Mothers' Aid and Support of Poor, 405.00 

Waltham Hospital, 250.00 

Board of Health, 125.25 

Fire Department, 376.65 

Cemetery, 412.47 

Total, $84,186.50 



75 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

Jan. 12, 1918. 
To the Hoard of Health: — 

I herewith submit the following report for the year end- 
ing December 31st, 1917: — 

Number of herds of cows, 81 

Number of milch cows, 492 

Number of dry cows. 

Number of young stock. 135 

Number of hulls. ■ 24 

Number of pigs, 535 

Number of sheep, 51 

Number of goats, 

Number of cows quarantined, 6 

Number of cows taken for tuberculosis, fi 

Number of cows quarantined and released, 

Number of horses quarantined, 

MAR/TIN M. WELCH, 

Inspector of Animals. 



76 



REPORT OF ANIMALS SLAUGHTERED 

Jan. 12, 1918. 
To the Board of Health: — 

I herewith submit the following report of animals 
slaughtered for the year ending December 31st, 1917 : — 

Pigs, 213 

Calves, 31 

Cattle, 15 

Pigs Condemned, 6 

Calves Condemned, 3 

Cattle Condemned, 

MARTIN M. WELCH, 
Member of the Board of Health. 



77 



REPORT OF FIRE ENGINEERS 

To the Board of Selectmen: — 

The Board of Fire Engineers herewith submit their tenth 
annual report, ending December 31, 1917. 

Force 

Thirty-three men belong to the department: one chief, 
six engineers and twenty-six call men. There are three 
organized companies. 

Apparatus 

The apparatus belonging to the Department is as 
follows : — Three wagons, one reel, one combination truck, 
twenty-five extinguishers, three ladders, one harness, hose, 
axes and plaster hooks. 

Location of Apparatus 
Xo. 1. Hose house, old schoolhouse, Lincoln Center. 
No. 2. Combination truck at Doherty's garage, So. 

Lincoln. 
Xo. 3. Hose house , John Dee farm, Virginia Road, 
Xorth Lincoln. 

Fires 

During the past year the truck has been called out as 
follows : — 

Two house fires and one barn, with a loss of about 
$15,750.00. 

One shed, four chimney and fifteen forest fires. 

ISAAC N. MACRAE, Chief, 

THOMAS DEE, 

HERBERT FARRAR, 

H. S. COUSINS, 

J. J. KELLIHER, 

ANDREW DOUGHERTY, 

M. H. DOHERTY, Engineers. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF 
STREETS 

To the Board of Selectmen: — 

I herewith submit the following report for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1917. Last winter was not so bad for 
the roads as it has been for some years previous. During 
the months of January, February, and the first part of 
March, the teams were hauling stone to different parts of 
the town for filling ruts, and breaking out roads when they 
needed it. The last part of March and the month of April 
was spent on filling ruts, and scraping the roads. The 
first part of May the roads were patched with patching 
material, and the last part of the month the teams were 
plowing and harrowing for the different farmers. The 
months of June and July were spent in putting out Tarvia 
B, covering it with sand, doing some patching, etc. The 
first part of August we worked making gravel roads near 
the Merrill Hunt place and on the Old County Road. The 
last of the month we worked on the Turnpike. During the 
month of September I built about 2,000 feet of Tarvia 
macadam road, about 12 feet wide, near the house of 
Winslow Eaton, on the AYaltham Road, and worked the 
rest of the month on the Turnpike. Also the months of 
October and November were spent widening, grading and 
blasting out ledge on the Turnpike, for which the State 
paid one-half the cost. The first part of December we 
patched the roads again where they needed it, built some 
new fence side of the road where it was dangerous, and 
repaired some of the old fence. The last of the month the 
teams have been hauling sand for next year's use. 

I have used the past year about 1,400 loads of sand and 
gravel, 30 carloads of crushed stone, besides what stone 
we had at the crusher. Most of this stone was used for 



79 



filling ruts and holes in the road. I also used for dust 
laying, etc., over 40,000 gallons of Tarvia and 6,000 gal- 
lons of oil. 

The following payments have been made during the 
year : — 

Hay, Grain, Straw, etc., approximately, $1,540.00 

Stone, Gravel, Sand, " 1.200.00 

Tarvia and Oil, " 3,358.00 

Supplies, etc., " 425.00 

Rent and Water, " 172.00 

Freight and Express, 415.00 

Shoeing and Repairing, 440.00 

Steam Roller, " 192.00 
Superintendent's Salary : 

Labor, Snow Work, etc. " 5,760.00 

Total, $13,502.00 

The sum total of which has been paid into 
the Town Treasury, and what is still due 
for labor, material, etc., is approxi- 
mately 1.904.00 



Amount expended for the year, 



$11,598.00 



1 have no list of where the money has been expended 
other than what is given in the first part of this report, 
except to say that I have put in several culvert pipes, 
scraped most of the roads and cleaned out the gutters. I 
have no crushed stone on hand for next year, and but a few 
hundred tons of stone at the crusher to be crushed. 

The Highway Department is in about the same condition 
as last year, except there has been added one two-horse 
sled and one platform wagon. I shall have to recommend 
not less than $12,000 for the highways for next year, as 



80 

the prices of all kinds of road material and grain have ad- 
vanced, and it will be hard to keep the expenditure down 
to that amount. 

I have had several new sign boards painted and put up 
in places where they were needed, and there are some more 
that will have to be repainted the coming year, but the guide 
boards as a whole are in fairly good condition. 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



81 



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srss 

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82 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF 
SINKING AND TRUST FUNDS 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

1917 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $3,140.89 

Coupons, Town of Lincoln 3ls 105.00 

Coupons. Town of Lincoln 3is, 1917 40.00 

Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s (Serial) 140.00 

Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s, 1936 560.00 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. 4s 160.00 

$500 Town of Lincoln Serial 4s due 500.00 

Cash. C. S. Wheeler, Treasurer 1,500.00 

$2000 Town of Lincoln 4s. due June, 1917 2,000.00 

$4000 American Tel. & Tel. 4s, sold 3,529.44 

Interest on deposit 31 .42 

$11,706.75 



1917 Cr. 

Dec. 31. Cash paid C. S. Wheeler, Treasurer $10,000.00 

Balance 1,706.75 



$11,706.75 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

$3,000 Town of Lincoln 4s. Serial Bonds, due 1912 to 1923. 
$14,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due September, 1936. 
$3,000 Town of Lincoln 3is, due September, 1932. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



83 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

FUND FOR PURCHASE OF SCHOOLHOUSE 
BONDS 

1917 Dr. 

Jan. 12. Balance $15,000.00 

Interest 481 . 17 

$15,481.17 

1917 Cr. 

Dec. 31. Cash on deposit $15,481.17 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



84 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

GEORGE G. TARBELL LEGACY TO THE LINCOLN 

LIBRARY 

1917 Dr. 

Tan. 1. Balance $29.60 

Dividends, West End St. Ry. common 3.50 

Dividends, American Tel. & Tel. Co 32.00 

Dividends, West End St. Ry. preferred 52.00 

Dividends, Boston & Lowell R. R. Co 64.00 

Coupons, United Fruit 4is. 1923 22.50 

Interest on deposit 4.46 



$208.06 



1917 O. 

Dec. 31. Cash, J. F. Farrar. Treasurer, Lincoln Library... $178.46 
Balance on deposit, principal account 29.60 



$208.06 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

8 shares Boston & Lowell Railroad Co. 
13 shares West End Street Railway Co. preferred. 
8 shares New York. New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 
4 shares American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
1 share West End Street Railway Co. common. 
$500 United Fruit Co. 4is, 1923. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



85 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

GEORGE RUSSELL LEGACY TO THE LINCOLN 
LIBRARY 



1917 D 



Jan. 1. Balance $33.02 

Dividends, Fitchburg Railroad Co 35.00 

Interest 1.60 

$69.62 



1917 Cr. 

Dec. 31. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treas. Lincoln Library $36.60 

Balance on deposit, principal account 33.02 

$69.62 

The Fund is invested as follows : 

7 shares Fitchburg Railroad Co. preferred. 

2 shares New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad I 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



86 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

JULIA A. BEMIS FUND FOR BENEFIT OF 
LINCOLN LIBRARY 

1917 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $7.25 

Dividends, West End St. Ry. common 7.00 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. Co 40.00 

July 25. $1,000 American Tel. & Tel. 4s. sold 891 .42 

Interest .40 



$946.07 



1917 Cr. 

Dec. 31. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treas. Lincoln Library $47.40 

$1,000 United States Rubber 5s, 1947 863.33 

Balance on deposit, principal account 35.34 



$946.07 

The Fund is invested as follows : 

2 shares West End Street Railway Co. common. 
$1,000 United States Rubber 5s, 1947. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY TO THE LINCOLN 
LIBRARY 

1917 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $18.33 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 5s 50.00 

Dividends, West End St. Railway common 3.50 

Interest 7.15 

$78.98 



1917 Cr. 

Dec. 31. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treas. Lincoln Library $60.65 

Balance, principal account 18.33 

$78.98 

The Fund is invested as follows : 

1 share West End Street Railway common. 

$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 5s, 1946. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



88 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR LINCOLN 
LIBRARY 

1917 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $89.62 

Dividends, West End St. Railway common 17.50 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. Co 80.00 

Sept. 12. $2,000 American Tel. & Tel. 4s, sold 1,721 . 25 

Interest 4.48 



$1,912.85 

1917 Cr. 

Sept. 12. $2,000 United States Rubber 5s, 1947 $1,740.00 

Dec. 31. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treas. Lincoln Library 101.98 

Balance on deposit, principal account 70.87 



$1,912.85 

The Fund is invested as follows : 

$2,000 United States Rubber 5s, 1947. 

5 shares West End Street Railway common. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



89 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR SILENT POOR 

1917 Dr. 

Jan. ,1. Balance $459.02 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. 4s 80.00 

$2,000 American Tel. & Tel. 4s. sold 1,773.72 

Interest 10.98 

$2,323.72 



1917 C 



June 15. Cash, Selectmen's order $10.00 

$2,000 United States Rubber 5s, 1947 1.727.78 

Dec. 31. Balance on deposit, income account 424.78 

Balance on deposit, principal account 161 . 16 



$2,323.7 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

$2,000 United States Rubber 5s. 1947. 



Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD. Treasurer. 



90 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account zuith 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR TOWN HEARSE 

1917 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance 184.89 

Dividend, Pennsylvania Railroad Co 33.00 

Interest on deposit 4.37 

$222.26 

1917 Cr. 

Nov. 2. 4 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co $194.50 

Dec. 31. Balance on deposit 27.76 

$222.26 

The Fund is invested as follows : 

15 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



91 

THE BEMIS LECTURE FUND TRUSTEES 

In Account with 

THE BEMIS LECTURE FUND 

1917 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $347.16 

Dividends. Pennsylvania Railroad Co 150.00 

Boston & Providence R. R 100.00 

Fitchburg Railroad pfd 50.00 

Old Colony Railroad 70.00 

Boston & Albany R. R 87.50 

American Tel. & Tel. Co 480.00 

Boston & Lowell R. R 240.00 

West End St. Ry. pfd 40.00 

Great Xorthern Ry. pfd 131.25 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. 5s 50.00 

Southern Railway 4s 120.00 

New York Railways 4s 40.00 

American Tel. & Tel. 4s 40.00 

Gain — American Tel. stock sold rights bought... 109.11 

$1,000 American Tel. & Tel. 4s, sold 883.61 

Interest on deposit 9. 14 



$2,947.77 



1917 Cr. 

Feb. 6. Cyrus E. Dallin, Lecture $63.20 

9. Doherty Garage to December 30th 6.75 

22. Campanian Entertainers, Concert 125.00 

27. P. A. Carter, Postals and Labor 2.85 

Mar. 2. Gen. George W. Goethals, Lecture 250.00 

9. Pe-Ahm-E-Squeet 77.40 

29. Powell Printing Co., Programs 9.00 

17. Boston Glee Club, Concert 121.00 

Apr. 4. W. C. Robus, Labor and Lantern 6.00 

W. C. Robus, Labor and Wire Lecture Hall 3.00 

Waterman S. C. Russell, Lecture 61 .00 

12. Christobel W. Kidder, Dramatic Reader 50.70 

May 7. Doherty Garage to April 12th 18.50 

Aug. 24. $1,000 United States Rubber 5s. 1947 866.39 



92 



Sept. 13. P. A. Carter, Postals and Labor 3.70 

16. John M. C. Wilson, Lecture 25.00 

Nov. 15. Boston Quintette & Carmine Fabrizio 147.25 

P. A. Carter, Postals and Labor 3.00 

22.. Mary Boyle O'Reilly, Lecture 75.00 

30. Adamsky Recitals & Hacques Hoffman 102.25 

Railroad tickets 3.50 

Dec. 11. H. Charles Wood, Lecture •. 115.00 

20. Ye Bradford Players 125.00 

29. Edwin M. Whitney 50.00 

Doherty Garage to December 29 16.50 

31. Balance 620.78 



$2,947.77 



The Fund of $30,000 is invested as follows : 

50 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 

30 " Boston & Lowell Railroad Co. 

10 " Boston & Providence Railroad Co. 

10 " Boston & Albany Railroad Co. 

10 " Fitchburg Railroad Co. 

10 " Old Colony Railroad Co. 

10 " West End Street Railway pfd. 

10 " New York, Xew Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 

10 " Boston & Maine Railroad Co. 

60 " American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 

50 " Northern Idaho & Montana Power Co. pfd. 

25 " Great Northern Railway Co. pfd. 

$4,000 New York Railways Co. 5s. 1942. 

$1,000 New York Railways Co. 4s, 1942. , 

$3,000 Southern Railway Co. 4s, 1956. 

$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 5s, 1946. 

$1,000 United States Rubber Co. 5s, 1947. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD. Treasurer. 



93 
ASSESSOR'S REPORT 



The Board of Assessors submit the following report : — 

Number of residents assessed on property, 233 

non-residents assessed on property, 80 

assessed on polls only. 155 

acres of land assessed, 8,740 

dwelling houses assessed, 269^ 

horses assessed. 2(A 

cows assessed, 422 

neat cattle other than cows assessed, 60 

swine assessed, 121 

sheep assessed, 189 

Value of land exclusive of buildings, $599,042.00 

buildings exclusive of land. 1,026,850.00 

real estate, 1.625,892.00 

personal estate, 262,122.00 



Total valuation, $1,888,014.00 

State tax, 10,340.00 

County tax, 4,728.95 

State Highway tax 1,030.00 

Town grants, 44,660.00 

Number of polls, 323 
Rate, $10.00 per $1,000.00 

Deduct for Income tax, $41,154.41 

Overlayings, 78.40 

CHARLES S. WHEELER, 
WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAX, 

Assessors, 



94 



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109 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH FOR 
THE YEAR ENDING FEBRUARY 1, 1917 

Lincoln, Feb. 1, 1918. 

Contagious diseases treated during the year 1917, with 
no deaths : — 

Chickenpox, 6 

Pulmonary, 1 

Measles, 1 

Scarlet Fever, 1 

Phthisis, 1 

CHAS. E. CLARK, 
Member of the Board of Health, 



110 

REPORT OF BOARD OF WATER 
COMMISSIONERS 

The Water Commissioners herewith present their annual 
report : — 

The first meeting of the Board was held March 10, 
1917. The full board, consisting of Dr. J. S. Hart, W. H. 
Sherman and S. Smith, was present, and organized with 
Or Hart as chairman and S. Smith as secretary. For the 
remainder of the year the Board, with the exception of its 
chairman, who is away with the army, has met regularly 
every month. Of the two extensions voted at the last 
town meeting, the Board has laid a two-inch pipe from the 
main opposite Miss C. B. Chapin's to Mr. Donaldson's, 
instead of laying from I. X. McRae's to the main, as voted. 
The same purpose was gained, but the expense was less. 
( Concerning the North Lincoln extension, no formal de- 
mand has ever been made before the Board, and the Board 
has attempted nothing toward starting it. However, when 
the state road was torn up, it was thought advisable to lay 
a pipe under it on the line where this extension may some 
clay go, thereby saving some expense later. In consequence, 
sixty feet of four-inch pipe was laid and a diagram of its 
position (corner State- Road and Virginia Road) is in the 
water works records. 

Another extension of about 300 feet of two-inch pipe 
was made for Mr. Donald Gordon. The matter of this 
extension came up suddenly, and the Board undertook it 
without an appropriation, and has paid for it from earn- 
ings. 

Few leaks have appeared the past year, but one serious 
leak occurred on the Station Road, near the culvert at Mrs. 
Hilliard's. where the pipe is 12 feet below the road surface. 
Twice before a part of this old cement pipe had to be dug- 
out at abnormal expense, and it undoubtedly is only a 



Ill 

question of a few years before all the cement pipe must be" 
replaced; therefore the Board, not forgetting the present 
high cost of materials and labor, thought it advisable to 
renew at a normal depth a section of this pipe from a gate 
near the center corner to the Brick house service, rather 
than search for a leak 12 feet underground, which at no 
point showed on the surface, and could not with any cer- 
tainty have been located within many feet. 

Hie electric pump has done very good service the past 
year, pumping more water at a lower cost of power than 
the steam pump did, besides the saving in oil, labor, smoke 
dust, and noise. The steam pump is practically in the 
same condition as a year ago, but the boilers are deterior- 
ating and probably could not be used much, if at all, with- 
out considerable expense. If the steam pump were needed 
in an emergency, it could no doubt be started within a day, 
but how long the boilers might last would be a matter of 
luck. However, the Board has not thought best to spend 
any money on them, thinking that in the not very distant 
future the Town might determine to swap the steam pump 
and boilers for another electric pump. If this comes about, 
there will be a valuable space available in the present boiler 
room which the Town could well put to some use. 

The profit and loss sheet shows the financial condition 
of the water works. On account of discontinued connec- 
tions last year, $63 was abated from the taxes. 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, 
SUMNER SMITH, 

U^atcr Commissioners of Lincoln. 



112 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS FOR YEAR 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1917 



Lincoln Water Works, Lincoln, Middlesex County, Mass. 

General Statistics 

Population by census of 1915, 1310. 

Date of construction, 1874. 

By whom owned, Town of Lincoln. 

Source of supply, Sandy Pond, Lincoln, Mass. 

Mode of supply, Pumping. 

Pumping Statistics 

Rumsey Triplex Pump, \0 l / 2 " x 12" 25 horse-power motor. 

Power, electricity. 

Power furnished by the Edison Electric Illuminating 

Company of Boston. 
Total water pumped for the year, 80,072,533 gallons. 
Average static head against which pump works, 148.5 feet. 
Average dynamic head against which pump works, 160 

feet. 
Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses 

(including salaries and fuel), $3,048; per million 

gallons pumped, $37 . 94. 
Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, 

power, salaries, interest, repairs and renewals, and 

depreciation, $199 per million gallons pumped. 
Rainfall, 36.06 inches. 



113 



Statistics Relating to Distribution System 



1. 



2. 
3. 

4. 

5. 
6. 



10. 



11 



Mains 




Services 


Kind of pipe used, 


12. 


Kind of pipe, galvan- 


cement lined, cast iron, 




ized iron and cement 


wood stave, galvanized 




lined. 


iron. 


13. 


Sizes, y A " to 4". 


Sizes, \y 2 " to 12". 


14. 


Discontinued, none. 


Extended during the 


15. 


Number of service taps 


year, 300 ft. 




added during the year, 


Discontinued during 




4. 


the year, none. 


16. 


Number now in use, 


Total now in use, 




332. 


26,571 miles. 


17. 


Average length of ser- 


Number of hydrants 




vice, 12' +. 


added during the year, 


18. 


Number of meters now 


none. 




in use, 40. 


Number of hydrants 






(public and private) 






now in use, 123. 






Number of stop-gates 






added during the year, 






none. 

Number of stop-gates 






now in use, 133. 






Number of blow-offs, 






30. 






Range of pressure on 






mains, 40 pounds to 






102 pounds. 







114 








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115 



WATER WORKS DEPARTMENT 



OUTSTANDING BONDS 

[ssue of 19C0, due 1930, SJ3.000.00 

Issue of 190J, due 1932, 9,000.00 

Issue of 1903, due 1933, 5,000.00 

[ssue of 1904, due 1934, 5,000.00 

Issue of 1906, due 1936, 14,000.00 

Issue of 1907, due 1937, 4,000.00 

[ssue of 1907, due one each year, 5,000.00 

[ssue of 1911, due one each year, 3,000.00 



$68,000.00 



Water Receipts 

Domestic, $9,327.44 

Meter, 2,275.17 

Uncollected, 2,457.18 

$14,059.79 



116 



REPORT OF CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

The Commissioners have not attempted to do more at 
the cemeteries than to keep them neat and attractive and 
preserve all the natural features of beauty. Xothing arti- 
ficial, extensive or intensive has been attempted, although 
the general appearance of the cemeteries from year to year, 
especially the newer cemetery, is much improved. 

JULIUS E. EVELETH,- 
CHARLES S. SMITH, 
FRITZ CUNNERT, 

Cemetery Commissioners. 



117 



THE TOW'S TREASURER 

In Account with 

THE LIXCOLX CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Cash of George L. Chapin for lot $20.00 

George G. Tarbell for lot 20.00 

Edward F. Flint for lot 20.00 

Clifford B. Whitney for lot 20.00 

" Francis Flint Fund 250.00 

Union Pacific R. R. Co., 2 dividends 12.00 

Fitchburg R. R. Co., 4 dividends 10.00 

" American Sugar Refining Co.. 4 dividends 28.00 



Total $380.00 

Deposited in Middlesex Institution for Savings 380.00 



The following is a list of Securities held by the Lincoln Cemetery 
Commissioners : — 

Four Shares American Sugar Refining Co., preferred stock. 
Three Shares Union Pacific R. R. Co., preferred stock. 
Two Shares Fitchburg R. R. Co., preferred stock. 

Also the following funds for the care of lots in cemetery, all of 
which are deposited in the Middlesex Institution for Savings: — 

(Villa J. Flint Fund, $300.00, interest accrued $80.36 

Samuel Hart well Fund. $300.00, interest accrued 80.36 

John H. Pierce Fund, $500.00, interest accrued 127.80 

Maria L. Thompson Fund, $500.00, interest accrued 133.82 

Annie A. Ray Fund, $300.00. interest accrued 80.36 

George F. Harrington Fund, $100.00, interest accrued 3.02 

Francis Flint Fund. $250.00, interest accrued ' 5.00 

Also 
General Fund deposited in Middlesex Institution for Savings, 

amounting to 930 . 48 



(Signed) CHARLES S. WHEELER, 

Town Treasurer. 



118 



TREE WARDEN'S REPORT 

The Tree Warden submits to the Town his report for 
the year 1917 : 

The work of this department has been carried on as in 
previous years, removing dead trees, dead limbs and limbs 
obstructing the highways. The brush has also been cut 
along a good many of the highways, where it interfered 
with public travel, — as we have a good many miles of very 
narrow roads in Lincoln, our work cannot be confined to 
any one section, but we do try to keep our highways pass- 
able and safe for the general public. Spraying operations 
were very late this year on account of the very late spring 
which we had, and was held up considerably on account of 
wet weather and also the scarcity of men to do the work. 
The trees on all the highways were sprayed, going over 
some of them a second time with very good results, and 
also the spraying on private property where we were asked 
to do same. The Town now owns a good spraying equip- 
ment, two large sprayers and one small or orchard sprayer 
which will do the work for years to come. 

Considering the Gypsy-Moth infestation as a whole, there 
has been no decrease during the past year ; the weather con- 
ditions have been unfavorable for the work of the parasites 
and natural enemies, and, on the average, an increase in 
infestation is noticeable in many sections. The Calosoma 
Beetle has not been as abundant this year as heretofore ; in 
some cases heavy mortality among the beeetles has been 
caused by skunks, squirrels and crows. This species has, 



119 

however, maintained its good reputation as a foe of Gypsy 
and Brown-Tail Moths. In the case of the Brown-Tail 
Moth, the infestation has been greatly reduced during the 
past two years. This has been brought about by several 
agencies, but the natural enemies have undoubtedly con- 
tributed materially. The total expenditure of this depart- 
ment, including the tree-work, was $3,916.55, of which 
there has been returned to the Town Treasurer $2,178.99 
on account of private work, leaving a net cost of $1,737. 56. 
I recommend that $2,500.00 be appropriated for Moth and 
Tree work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Tree Warden. 



120 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

The Trustees herewith submit the reports of the Treas- 
urer and Librarian for the year ending Dec. 31, 1917. 

At a meeting of the Trustees in December, the following 
vote was unanimously passed and spread upon the records. 

VOTED, That while the trustees regret the enforced 
absence from their meetings of George G. Tarbell, one of 
its members, they consider it an honor to be associated with 
one who as 2nd Lieutenant, 101st Engineers, American 
Expeditionary Forces in France, is doing his duty as a 
soldier in every respect. 

They ask for an appropriation of $500 and the Dog Tax. 

C. LEE TODD, 

Chairman of the Trustees. 



121 



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122 



STATISTICAL REPORT OF THE LINCOLN 

PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR THE YEAR 

ENDING FEBRUARY 1, 1917 

Number of volumes in Library, Feb. 1, 1917, 10,483 

Increase by purchase, 200 

Increase by gift, 1 

Xumber of volumes rebound, 47 
Xumber of volumes withdrawn, replaced by 

new copies, 11 

Xumber of volumes in Library, Feb. 1, 1918, 10,684 

Total delivery of books for year, 7,477 

Largest delivery in one day, 149 

Smallest delivery in one day, 23 

Xumber of days Library was open, 102 

Gifts of books, periodicals, etc., have been received from 
the following persons : — Miss Annie E. Bartlett, Miss 
Addie Campbell, Mr. Arthur Chapin, Mr. William A. 
Cheney, Mr. W. Hilliard, Miss Bertha Scripture, Mr. J. 
Waldo Smith, Mr. Moorfield Storey. 

Gifts of reports, catalogues, bulletins, from Public 
Libraries and other institutions, as follows : — Chambre de 
Commerce de Paris, United States Food Administration, 
Boston Public Library, Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Free 
Public Library Commission, Carnegie Hero Fund Com- 
mission, Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station, 
State Board of Agriculture, State Board of Health, Massa- 
chusetts Total Abstinence Society, Soldiers' Home in 
Massachusetts, Woman's Education Association, Woman's 



123 

Peace Party, Woman's Municipal League, Library of 
Congress, Groton Public Library, Hartford Public Library, 
Worcester Public Library, Springfield Public Library. 
Brookline Public Library, Xewton Public Library, Wal- 
tham Public Library, Concord Public Library, Friends' 
Free Public Library, Xewark New Britain Institute, 
Concord Christian Science Literature Committee, Latin 
Xews Association, W T orld Peace Foundation, Yedanta 
Centre, Home Market Club, H. W. Wilson Co. 



124 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 
Accessions to the Library for 1917 

FICTION 

Abbott, Eleanor Hallowell. The stingy receiver 768.21 

Aldrich, Mildred. Told in a French garden, August, 

1914 931.22 

Altsheler, Joseph A. Eyes of the woods: story of the 

ancient wilderness 769 . 2 

Bacheller, Irving. Light in the clearing 756.25 

Bailey, Temple. Mistress Anne 755.25 

Barr, Amelia E. Christina : a Fife fisher girl 769 . 1 

Beith, Ian Hay, Major. "Pip," a romance of youth 922.24 

Benjamin, Rene. Private Gaspard: soldier of France... 912.23 

Bennett, Arnold. The lion's share 714.32 

Benson, E. F. The tortoise 769.25 

Bottome, Phyllis. The derelict: and other stories 768.23 

Brown, Alice. Bromley neighborhood 769.6 

Brown, Katharine Holland. Wages of honor; other 

stories 769.21 

Buchan, John. Green mantle 922.25 

Conrad, Joseph. The shadow line: a confession 713.31 

Cholmondeley, Alice, pseud. Christine 769 . 13 

Daviess, Maria Thompson. Out of a clear sky 768.25 

Day, Holman. Where your treasure is 765.26 

De Maupassant, Guy. The necklace; and other stories. 768.22 
Doyle, Arthur Conan. His last bow: a reminiscence of 

Sherlock Holmes 769.26 

Eastman, Rebecca Hooper. The big little person: a 

romance 769 . 24 

Ervine, St. John G. Changing winds 713.30 

Farnol, Jeffrey. Definite object 765 . 25 

Ferber, Edna. Fanny herself 769 . 14 

Fester, Maximilian. Shoestrings 912.26 

Fox, Edward Lyell. The new Gethsemane 769.18 

Grayson, David. Great possessions: a new series of 

adventures ' 769.17 

Grey, Zane. Lone Star ranger: romance of the Border. 921.25 

Wild Fire 714.29 

Hall, Gertrude. Aurora the magnificent 768.26 



125 

Harben, Will X. Second choice 

Hardy, Arthur Sherburne. Helen 

Harris, Garrard. Trail of the Pearl 

Irwin, Florence. The mask 

Johnston, William. "Limpy." the boy who felt neglected 

King, Basil. The lifted veil 

Kipling, Rudyard. Diversity of creatures 

Leacock, Stephen. Literary lapses 

Moonbeams from the larger lunacy 

Lee, Jennette. The green jacket 

Lincoln, Joseph C. Cap'n Dan's daughter 

Extricating Obadiali 

London, Jack. The sea wolf 

McFee, William. Casuals of the sea: voyage of a soul. . 

Marsh, Richard. The beetle: a mystery 

Marshall, Archibald. The old order changeth 

Montgomery, L. II. Anne's house of dreams 

Norris, Kathleen. Martie the unconquered 

Oemler, Marie Conway. Slippy McGee 

Oppenheim, E. Phillips. Kingdom of the blind 

Pier, Arthur Stan wood. Jerry 

Poole, Ernest. His family 

Porter, Eleanor H. The road to understanding 

Richmond, Grace S. Red Pepper's patients 

Rinehart, Mary Roberts. Altar of freedom 

Bab, a Sub- Deb 

Seton, Ernest Thompson. Preacher of Cedar mountain: 

a tale of the open country 

Sewell, Ford. Wilt thou, Torcliy 

Sidgwick, Ethel. Hatchways 

Sinclair, Upton. King Coal 

Snaith, J. C. The coming 

Stern, E. G. My mother and I: with a foreword by 

Theodore Roosevelt 769 . 4 

Tagore, Sir Rabindranath. Hungry stones; and other 

stories 714.33 

Van Loan, Charles S. Old man Curry 769. 19 

Ward, Mrs. Humphrey. Missing 769. 10 

Wawn, F. T. The joyful years 769 . 15 

Webster, Jean. Daddy Long-Legs 922 . 27 

Wells, H. G. Mr. Britling sees it through 754.25 

Soul of a bishop 769 . 3 



714.37 


714.31 


714.35 


769.20 


922.26 


713. 


.33 


768.27 


918.29 


912. 


.24 


769 


16 


768.20 


769.9 


918.28 


714. 


.34 


713 


.32 


912 


.25 


745. 


.25 


769.8 


769.7 


714.36 


713 


.26 


713 


.27 


713 


.25 


769 


.12 


713 


29 


768 


19 


713 


,24 


713. 


28 


714.30 


769. 


22 


769. 


23 



612. 


16 


612. 


17 


645.6 


645. 


15 


645. 


12 


645. 


13 


547. 


.17 


645.5 



126 

BIOGRAPHY 

Burr, Agnes. Russell H. Conwell and his work; one 

man's interpretation of life '. . 646. 1 

Chapman,. John Jay. William Lloyd Garrison 645.9 

Carpenter, Edward. My days and dreams: being auto- 
biographical notes 531 . 25 

De Hegermann-Lindencrone, Lillie. In the courts of 
memory. 1858-1875. From contemporary letters, il- 
lustrated with portraits, facsimiles, etc 

De Hegermann-Lindencrone, Lillie. Sunny side of dip- 
lomatic life. 1875-1912 

Eastman, Charles A. (Ohiyesa). From the deep woods 
to civilization. Chapters in the autobiography of an 
Indian 

Elson, Louis L. Great composers and their work 

Evans, Beriah Gwynfe. Life romance of Lord George. 

Fuller, Margaret. A New England childhood 

Garland, Hamlin. Son of the middle Border 

Gilder, Rosamond. Letters of Richard Watson Gilder. 

Hobson, Elizabeth Christopher. Recollections of a 

happy life 645 . 7 

Johnston, Charles H. L. Famous cavalry leaders: 
through the ages with the heroes of sabre, spur and 
saddle, with faithful accounts of their dashing raids 
and glorious charges 645 . 14 

Laughlin, Clara E. James Whitcomb Riley 531.26 

Livingstone, W. P. Mary Slessor of Calabar: Pioneer 

missionary to Africa 645 . 1 1 

Ravage, M. E. An American in the making: life-story 
of an immigrant 

Richards, Laura E. Abigail Adams and her times 

Elizabeth Fry: the angel of the prisons 

Singmaster, Elsie. Martin Luther 

Stowe, Lyman Beecher and Scott, Emmett J. Booker 
T. Washington: builder of a civilization 

Tagore, Sir Rabindranath. My reminiscences 

Whitlock, Brand. Abraham Lincoln 

USEFUL ARTS 

Bailey, L. H. Manual of gardening: a practical guide 
to the making of home grounds and the growing of 
flowers, fruits and vegetables for home use 214.11 



634.22 


612.15 


645.8 


612.18 


642.1 


646.2 


645.10 



214 


.13 


145 


,29 


135 


.28 


125.33 


135.27 


125.32 


131 


10 



127 

Morrison, Edward, and Brues, Charles Thomas. How 
to make the garden pay: a manual for the intensive 
cultivation of home vegetable gardening 214. 12 

Bitting, A. \V. and A. G. Canning, and how to use 
canned foods 

Fabre, J. Henri. Life of the caterpillar 

Green, Mary. Better meals for less money 

Kinne, Helen. Foods and household management; a 
text-book of the household arts 

Powell, Ola. Successful canning and preserving 

Rose, Mary Swartz. Feeding the family 

Rorer, Mrs. Sarah Tyson. Key to simple cookery 

DESCRIPTION AM) TRAVEL 

Child, Richard Washburn. Potential Russia 447.14 

Emerson, Walter. Latchstring to Maine woods and 

waters , § 442 l .27 

Gleason, Arthur. Inside the Hritish Isles 423.17 

Mackenzie, Jean Kenyon. An African trail 447.15 

Muir, John. Thousand mile walk to the Gulf 442.26 

Patton, Cornelius H. Lure of Africa 447.16 

Souiny, Baroness. Russia of yesterday and tomorrow 423. IS 

EUROPEAN WAR AND ALLIED SUBJECTS 

Aldrich, Mildred. On the edge of the war zone: from 
the battle of the Marne to the entrance of the Stars 

and Stripes 1331 . 17 

Atherton, Gertrude. The living present 1331.15 

Bairnsfather, Bruce. Bullets and billets 1317. 12 

Beaufort, J. M. de. Behind the German veil 1322.27 

Bowser, Thelka. Britain's civilian volunteers: author- 
ized story of British voluntary and detachment 

work in the great war 1335.26 

Bullitt, Ernesta Drinker. An uncensored diary from the 

Central Empires 1331 . 8 

Curtin, D. Thomas. Land of deepening shadows: Ger- 
many at war 1 322 . 23 

Dawson, Coningsby. Carry on: letters in war time.... 1322.26 
Empey, Arthur Guy. "Over the top": an American 

soldier who went; together with Tommy's dictionary 1335.25 
Fernau, Hermann. The coming democracy 1331.19 



128 

Gallishaw, John. Trenching at Gallipoli: personal nar- 
rative of a Newfoundlander with the ill-fated Dar- 
danelles expedition 1322.24 

Gerard, James W. My four years in Germany 634.21 

Gibson, Hugh. Journal from our Legation in Belgium. 1331.18 

Hankey, Donald. Student in arms. (2nd series) 1331.10 

Student in arms. (1st series) 1332.22 

Huard, Francis Wilson. My home in the field of honor. 1317.14 

My home in the field of mercy 1331 . 14 

Kipling, Rudyard. Sea warfare 1317.15 

Priestman, E. G. With a B. P. Scout in Gallipoli: a 

record of the Belton bulldogs 1331.11 

Rolland, Romain. Above the battle 1317.8 

Stanton, Theodore (Translator). Soldier of France to 
his mother: letters from the trenches on the West- 
ern front 1331 . 13 

Swope, Herbert Bayard. Inside the German veil: in the 

third year of the war 1325.30 

Waddington, Mary King. My war diary 1331. 16 

Ward, Mrs. Humphrey. Towards the goal 1331.9 

Wells, H. G. Italy, France and Britain at war 1317.11 

POETRY, DRAMA 

Oxenham, John. Bees in amber: a little book of 

thoughtful verse 1423. 11 

'All's well" 1435.23 

The vision splendid 1436.24 

Chapman, Arthur. Out where the West begins: and 

other Western verses 1423 . 10 

Zangwill, I srael 1435 . 22 

RELIGION, PHILOSOPHY 

Wells, H. G. God, the invisible King 1137. 13 

Hodges, George. Religion in a world at war 1137.14 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Baring, Gould. Outline of Russian literature 1536.28 

Batchelder, Roger. Watching and waiting on the Bor- 
der 1536.26 

Clemens, Samuel L. (Mark Twain). What is man? and 

other essays 1536.27 

Forbush, William Byron. Child study and child training 1317.9 



129 

Franks, Thetta Quay. Margin of happiness: reward of 

thrift 1317 . 16 

Lindsay, Yachel. Guide to beggars, especially those of 
the poetic fraternity; being sundry explorations 
made while penniless and afoot in Florida, Georgia, 
North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, New Jersey, 
and Pennsylvania. These adventures convey and il- 
lustrate the rules of beggary for poets and some 

others 1317.7 

Sabin, Edwin L. How are you feeling now? 1536.29 

Schwab, Charles M. Succeeding with what you have... 1332.27 

Stciner, Edward A. Nationalizing America 1534.29 

Tarbell, Ida M. New ideals in business: an account of 

their practise and their effects upon men 1317.6 

HISTORY 

Nicolay, Helen. Our nation in the building 365.3 

Kellogg, Louise Phelps. Early narratives of the North- 
west. 1634-1699 352. 14 

REFERENCE 

Eleventh annual report of the Board of Water Supply 
of the City of New York. Accompanied by the re- 
port of the Chief Engineer, Dec. 31st, 1916 Ref. R. R. 

Seabury, Joseph Stowe. Old homes under new roofs... Ref. R. R. 

CHILDREN'S BOOKS 

Altcheler, Joseph A. Horsemen of the plains 1217.22 

Austin, Oscar Phelps. Uncle Sam's boy at war 817.27 

Barbour, Ralph Henry. Hitting the line 1227.26 

Blaisdell, Albert F., and Ball, Francis K. American his- 
tory for little folks 827.30 

Browne, Francis. Granny's wonderful chair, and its 

tales of Fairy times 1211.22 

Burgess, Thornton W. Adventures of Danny Meadow 

Mouse 1234 . 25 

Adventures of Sammy Jay 1234.26 

Boy scouts on Swift river 817.26 

Mother West Wind "When" stories 1225 . 25 

Mother West Wind "Why" stories 1217.30 

Canfield, Dorothy. Understood Betsy 1227.27 

Cave, Edward. Boy scout's hike book 1217.25 



130 

Cowles, Julia Darrow. Our little Saxon cousin of long 
ago: being the story of Twigar, a boy of the Anglo- 
Saxons in the time of Alfred the Great 1228.15 

De Groot, Cornelia. When I was a girl in Holland 1225.24 

Deland,' Ellen Douglas. The Waring girls 1238.18 

Dickenson, Asa Don, and Dickenson, Helen Winslow. 

Children's book of patriotic stories 812.30 

Dimock, A. W. Be prepared: or, the Boy Scouts in 

Florida 1217.23 

Gaines, Ruth. Treasure flower 1216. 17 

Grey, Zane. Last of the Plainsmen 1217.29 

Grover, Eulalie Osgood. Over all boys in Switzerland.. 825.28 
Howard, Margaret. '"Truly stories from the Surely 

Bible 1213.30 

Caine, Ralph D. College years 1217 . 24 

Pier, Arthur Stanwood. The Plattsburgers 1228. 14 

Porter, Stratton Gene. Morning Face 1211.23 

Poulsson, Emilie and Laura E. Top of the world stories 1216.19 

Rhoades, Nina. Plucky little Patsy 1238.19 

Richards, Lela Horn. Blue Bonnet: Debutante 1217.27 

Rolt-Wheeler, Francis. Boy with the U.S. weatherman 812.31 

The Polar hunters 1227 .2'^ 

Wonder of war in the air 826.28 

Sabin, E. L. Opening the West with Lewis and Clark. 812.24 
Theiss, Lewis E. Lumber Jack-Bob: a story of a lum- 
ber camp in the Alleghenies 1216. 18 

Tomlinson, Everett T. Tecumseh's young braves 1234.25 

Trail of the Mohawk chief 1211.24 

Warde, Margaret. Nancy Lee 1238.20 

Webster, Jean. Just Patty 1217.26 

Wells, Carolyn. Story of Betty 1217.29 

Yard, Robert Sterling. Top of the continent: story of a 

cheerful journey through our National parks 812.23 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE 



SCHOOL YEAR 1917 




132 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

ANTHONY J. DOHERTY, Chairman, Term expires 1919 
AMOS R. LITTLE, Secretary, Term expires 1920 

MRS. ELIZABETH W. BLODGETT, Term expires 1918 

Superintendent of Schools 
THOMAS E. BENNER 

Supervisor of Manual Training and Drawing 
WALTER F. BRACKETT 

Supervisor of Seztnng 
MRS. ABBIE P. SMITH 

Supervisor of Cooking 
MRS. BERTHA A. JOSLIN 

Teachers 

Grammar Grades VII-VIII 
HELEN C. STRONG 

Grammar Grade VI 
ANNA STRID 

Grammar Grade V 
GLADYS TYLER 

Grammar Grade IV 
GEORGIANNA F. KEITH 

Primary Grades 1 1 -1 1 1 
JENNIE WHEATON 

Primary Grade I 
HATTIE B. HEATH 

Attendance Officer 

j MATTHEW H. DOHERTY 

Janitor 

WILLIAM COSTELLO 



133 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

During the year it became necessary to make several 
changes, the most important, perhaps, being in regard to 
superintendence. It seemed to the committee advisable to 
appoint as superintendent a man who could devote his 
entire time to the Lincoln schools. Our former superin- 
tendent had given one day only. Mr. Thomas E. Benner 
was therefore appointed, and the committee feel very 
strongly that the change has been of marked benefit to the 
schools and pupils. We are very sorry to have to announce, 
however, that Mr. Benner has enlisted and is now only 
waiting to be called. During his absence we may have to 
temporarily return to our previous custom of only having 
a superintendent for one day a week. 

It has been a great advantage to the cause of education 
in Lincoln that having a superintendent during the entire 
time he has been able to keep oversight of our pupils attend- 
ing the high schools in Concord and Waltham. He has thus 
been able to keep the committee very freely informed as to 
the progress of various high school scholars. 

Under our previous method of high school education the 
Lincoln scholars after graduation from the Lincoln school 
passed to a very large extent out of the supervision of the 
Lincoln school committee. The committee feel that the 
changes which it has been necessary to make in the teaching 
force, during the year, have been so managed as to cause 
the least possible handicap on efficient work. 

As the grades at the South School had been very small, 
the committee deemed it advisable as a matter of economy 



134 

to close the school. At the beginning of the school term 
the children were taken to the Centre School. This change 
was found to have other benefits in that it brought all the 
children to one building where they could be at all times 
under direct supervision. 

An important matter which should be brought to the 
attention of the town at the present time is the question of 
providing further accommodations that may be necessary 
owing to crowded conditions of the present grades. Al- 
though the matter is taken care of conveniently at this time, 
it is quite evident that conditions may be such in the future 
that the present school building will not meet the full needs. 
Although the manual training department is taken care of 
for the present, the quarters are not the most desirable and 
should not in any sense become permanent. 

A more detailed account of the school work and its 
various problems will be set forth in the report of the 
superintendent annexed hereto. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ANTHONY J. DOHERTY, 

ELIZABETH W. BLODGETT, 
AMOS R. LITTLE. 



135 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Winter 'Term begins Monday, January 7, 1918, ends 
March 22; eleven weeks. 

Spring Term begins Monday, April 1, ends Friday, June 
14 ; eleven weeks. 

Fall Term begins Tuesday, September 3, ends Friday, 
December 20; sixteen weeks. 

Winter Term begins Monday, January 6, 1919, ends 
March 21 ; eleven weeks. 

Spring Term begins Monday, March 31, ends Friday, 
June 13; eleven weeks. 

Recess from Wednesday before Thanksgiving to Mon- 
day following. 

Holidays: Xew Year's Day, Washington's Birthday, 
Patriots' Day, Memorial Day, Columbus Day. 

Length of school year, thirty-eight weeks. 



136 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

To the School Committee of the Town of Lincoln: — 

The following letter from our State Commissioner of 
Education, Payson Smith, will serve as introduction to this 
first "war report" from your school executive : 

January 2, 1918. 

With the approach of the annual town meetings, 
when the question of appropriations is to be taken 
up, our people should give thoughtful attention 
to the unusual conditions confronting the schools. 
Increased costs in every direction bring the towns 
and cities face to face with the necessity of in- 
creasing school appropriations for the coming 
year. The schools have never before required 
more thoughtful attention to their needs, and it 
will not be safe to handicap them with a policy 
of retrenchment. 

It is worthy the attention of the American 
people that, in spite of enormous expenditures for 
war purposes, France is giving unprecedented at- 
tention to her public schools, and England, for 
the current year, increased her expenditures for 
public education 30 per cent, over that for any 
preceding year. 

In the school year 1915-16, Massachusetts ex- 
pended approximately $27,000,000 for public edu- 
cation. This amount was increased to $28,500,000 
for the school year 1916-17. This increase of 
approximately 6 per cent, shows the serious 
intention of our people to maintain a vigorous 
educational policy. In view of the present situa- 
tion, Massachusetts cannot afford to relax in any 
degree her efforts to carry on her schools at 
highest efficiency. 



137 

Education is a long-time investment. Its pur- 
pose is to protect democracy through the right 
training of the youth. Even temporary interfer- 
ence with this purpose, through inadequate 
financial support, may seriously impair the quality 
of our future citizenship. In the present crisis, it 
is imperative that towns and cities give careful 
consideration to the needs of the schools. 

Sincerely yours, 

PAYSON SMITH. 
Commissioner of Education. 

Numerous bulletins issued by the United States Bureau 
of Education have emphasized the same point, — namely, 
that the present situation demands expansion of the educa- 
tional system. Xo war-time economy of dollars and cents 
at the expense of the greatest possible educational efficiency 
is either wise or patriotic. Reduced man power throughout 
the world after the war must be answered by the increased 
efficiency of the meager forces available. It is through the 
schools largely that this increased efficiency may be 
achieved. 

What This Report Has to Say 

It is the purpose of this report to answer the following 
questions : 

1. What have been the physical accomplishments and 
what are the physical needs of the elementary school pupils 
of Lincoln? 

2. What have been the mental accomplishments and what 
are the mental needs of the elementary school pupils of 
Lincoln ? 

3. What have been the accomplishments and what are 
the needs of the high school pupils of Lincoln? 

4. How have the Lincoln school interests been made Lin- 
coln home interests? 



138 

5. How many teachers have we? What changes have 
taken place among their number? Who are they? 

6. In what way has the Lincoln Center school building 
presented problems and how have they been met? 

7. How does Lincoln compare with surrounding cities 
and towns in resource^ appropriations for school purposes, 
and apportionment of school funds? 

Elementary School Pupils 

In answering the first question the physical accomplish- 
ments and physical needs of the elementary school pupils 
of Lincoln are the subject of investigation. Dr. H. A. 
Wood of Waltham has kept the health and cleanliness of 
these children under surveillance in his weekly visits. 
CHART I, below, shows the findings of his examinations 
at the beginning of the present school year compared with 
his findings in the previous year. 

Chart I 

Results of Physical Examination of Elementary 

School Pupils by School Physician 



1917 1916 






Total Number Examined 163 173 

Cases of Pediculosis 15 9.2 12 6.9 2.3 

Cases of Bad Teeth 101 62.0 67 38.7 23.3 

Cases of Bad Tonsils or Adenoids. 40 24.5 40 23.1 1.4 

Cases of Glands Needing Attention . 59 36.2 21 12.1 24.1 

Cases of Bad Posture 64 39.3 79 45.7 6.4* 



Decrease. 



139 



Although there is undoubtedly variation from year to 
year in the standards set, these figures are near enough the 
facts to be worth heeding. They show the need of a "fol- 
low up" of the examination. To carry this out propeily 
the services of a school nurse who could devote at least 
one' full day each week to visiting the homes of those chil- 
dren who required attention would be necessary. 

From CHART I it may be seen that one pupil in every 
eleven attending the Lincoln Center school was suffering 
from pediculosis. To cure these cases and prevent their 
recurrence requires also the cure of the other members ^i 
the family and their instruction in the cleanliness necessary 
to avoid further difficulties. It would he a duty of the 
school nurse to see to this. 

Il may also be seeen from CHART 1 that three children 
in every five have teeth needing a dentist's attention, one in 
every four has tonsil> or adenoids which hinder his mental 
and physical efficiency, and one in every three has gland- 
needing attention. 

It can do little good to pay $2l annually for the >erv- 
ices of a physician to detect these faults and recommend for 
their cure unless we make sure that hi- recommendations 
are carried out. An expenditure of $200 annually for the 
services of a school nurse who would do this ''follow up" 
work would to a great extent remedy the present ineffi 
ciency. 

The one encouraging feature of CHART I is the im- 
provement in posture of 1917 over 1916. During his 
examination of the children. Dr. Wood commented on the 
fact that in 1916 they had not known how to breathe deeply 
when told to do so, but had learned how since that time. 
This he attributed to the fifteen-minute physical exercise 
period which has preceded the second recess during the 



140 

past year. It is probable that this physical exercise period 
is also responsible for the improvement in posture. 

Girls Need Out-of-door Exercise 

One of our greatest needs is some form of out-of-door, 
play exercise that will interest all the girls. It has been 
quite easy to find this for the boys. In the fall, baseball 
gave almost every one of them the vigorous play-activity 
which recesses should provide. An adaptation of soccer 
football later supplied this need. The younger made use 
of the swings and teeter-boards. 

Miss Georgianna Keith, in charge of the fourth grade, 
has organized a class for folk dancing from the girls of the 
first four grades. This has given these pupils. both the 
needed exercise and the necessary concomitant of enjoy- 
ment. But for the older girls there has been little or 
nothing. 

If a section of the playground could be levelled and put 
in proper condition the girls of the upper four grades could 
play field hockey, — a game so well adapted to girls that 
many girls' schools have made it their principal out-door 
pastime. It has the advantage of being easily adapted to 
a large number of players, of not being so strenuous, as to 
endanger the health of the girls, and of teaching the ''team 
play" which women need especially to learn. 

The Three R's 

Turning to the second question which this report under- 
takes to answer, the "Three R's" are traditionally the first 
mental accomplishment which comes to our minds. Read- 
ing is a subject of which it is difficult to say much worth 
saying. The question is : Is reading being correctly and 
efficiently taught to the Lincoln elementary school pupils? 



141 

We think it is. Probably 99 per cent, of all our reading 
as adults is silent reading, — reading for our own instruction 
or entertainment. Good silent readers may read aloud 
poorly. We cannot, then, judge how efficient a pupil's 
reading ability will be in his adult life simply by having him 
read aloud. It was the intention of your superintendent 
to use, later, some of the methods which have been devised 
for testing the efficiency of a pupil's silent reading. Mean- 
while the teachers have enthusiastically "aided and abetted" 
the circulation of library books among the pupils. This 
means, in fact, home work in silent reading which the pupil 
is not only willing but eager to do. It means, also, the 
obvious values which acquaintance with books and the 
acquisition of the reading habit contribute. 

Of 'Riting we can speak more concretely. Standards 
have been devised for measuring with greater accuracy than 
was obtainable before, the quality of samples of penman- 
ship. On September 18, last, tests were given in penman- 
ship under standard conditions which made it possible to 
compare them with similar tests in other towns or cities. 
CHART II, below, shows the result of these tests to have 
been most complimentary to Lincoln. Speed is in terms of 
letters per minute. Quality is in terms of the Ayres Scale 
for measuring the quality of handwriting. The median 
is the middle score. That is: the eighth grade median 
would be the score of the eighth grade pupil than whom 
there were just as many poorer as better. It is the score 
of the pupil who was in the middle of the class in that 
particular test. 

In considering CHART II, it should be remembered that 
the same tests were given, in the same length of time, and 
under the same conditions in all these schools. Speed rep- 
resents the average of the number of letters per minute 
written in a one-minute and a four-minute speed test. 



142 



Average quality represents the average of the quality of a 
sample written from dictation, the one-minute speed sample, 
and the lines written during the last minute of the four- 
minute speed sample. It is natural that during the last 
minute of the four-minute speed test, the quality of the pu- 
pil's handwriting would be poorest. I have included the 
rank of this poorest quality for the Lincoln pupils in 
CHART II simply to show that even their poorest writing, 
in the two upper grades at least, was superior to the average 
quality of all those other schools for which I have figures. 

Chart II 

Quality and Speed of Penmanship of Lincoln 

Grammar School Pupils Compared 

With Those of Other Cities 



Lincoln 

Brookline .... 

Newton 

Missouri Training 
Schools .... 



Grade V 


Medians 










be >> 


v >> 


T3 


rt.t; 


u .ti 












o « 




> 3 


O 3 


m 


<ot 


ChC* 


69 


46 


43 


76 


44 




73 


48 




80 


41 





Grade VI 
Medians 



K. ^ « 



Grade VII 
Medians 



— v u~~ v. — - i « h •— «- — 



> 3 §3 



85 51 45 
87 46 . . 
85 51 .. 









Tfl 


tf.ti 


U.- 










w rt 






> 3 


5 3 


tn 


<o> 


cua 



92 42 



88 63 57 

90 47 . . 

94 50 .. 

92 45 .. 



Grade VI TI 
Medians 



C > 3 o 3 



95 66 63 

98 49 .. 

102 53 . . 

102 47 . . 



It is to be noted, however, that though the Lincoln pupils 
excel in quality of handwriting in all but the fifth grade, in 
no grade is their speed up to the standard reached else- 
where. By emphasizing greater speed and at the same time 
striving to guard against any back-sliding in quality we 
lrope to approximate the standards attained in these other 
cities. The value of these tests in diagnosing the needs in 
the subjects to which they apply is, I think, self-evident. 



143 

Of 'Rithmetic, the last of the three R's, it is also possible 
to speak in fairly concrete terms. On October 18, last, tests 
in the four fundamental operations (addition, subtraction, 
multiplication, and division) were given in all our grades 
above the third. These were so-called "standard" tests 
which have been given to many thousands of pupils 
throughout this country under conditions as nearly as pos- 
sible the same. * Their values, like those of the penmanship 
tests mentioned above, lie in the facts that they afford com- 
parison with the accomplishments of other communities and 
that they serve to diagnose the pupils' difficulties to a cer- 
tain extent. 

After giving the standard tests on October 18, daily prac- 
tice in these fundamental processes was given the pupils, 
using a new and very efficient system recently devised which 
permits each child to progress at his own rate in competi- 
tion with his own record as well as the records of his class- 
mates. This practice was followed on December 20 by 
another rating of the class by means of the standard tests. 
CHART III, below, gives the results of these two tests as 
well as the standards which the results in other cities and 
towns show we should strive to reach, ft is explained as 
follows : — 



144 



Chart III 

Graphic Presentation of Standings of Upper Five 
Grades in Four Fundamentals in Arithmetic 
on' October 18 and on December 20, With 
Standings We Should Strive to Reach 

Arithmetic 



—ADDITION- 



GRADE V 



GRADE VIa 




Sorrect 

—SUBTRACTION— 




Correct 




Orrect 



GRADE VII 




GRADE VIII 






• i 


! ! 


^B 




• 

Pi 


I 




■^^^CorreVt 


0) 

r 


■ 
* % Correct 









• MULTIPLICATION - 
"1 









—DIVISION— 



I 
t.-J 



$3mm 





Black areas show results of Oct. 18th test. Shaded 
areas show results of Dec. 20th test. Dotted line indicates 
standard expected of grade. 

Height shows number of problems done. Width shows 
number of problems correct. If all were done correctly, 
then, the figures would be squares,— that is, as wide as they 
are tall. 



145 

The first row shows the results in addition in the five 
grades in -the October 18 and the December 20 tests, as well 
as the results we should strive to obtain. The figure in the 
first column of the top row should be interpreted as fol- 
lows : In addition, the fourth grade on October 18 had 
reached only about half the speed which it should strive for, 
as shown by comparing the height of the black area with the 
height of the area surrounded by the dotted line. Even this 
work was lamentably inaccurate as shown by comparing 
the width of the black area with its height. On December 
20 the work of this grade in addition had improved in speed, 
as shown by the greater height of the shaded area, and in 
accuracy, as shown by the better proportion of width to 
height in the shaded area. It was still so far from the 
standards for which the grade is striving that it is prac- 
tically hopeless to try to reach them this year. 

The important question is : Why is this true and how 
can it be remedied ? It is unlikely that it is the fault of any 
single inefficiency. It is certain that it is not the fault of the 
present teacher of the class, who is doing her work splen- 
didly in the face of the handicap which so great a defi- 
ciencv presents. A contributing factor is doubtless the 
sacrifice of the pupil's welfare which must result when two 
grades are combined under the instruction of one teacher. 
The corrective for this is a teacher for each grade the mo- 
ment the number of pupils reaches the point to make this 
practical. Another factor is the isolation of the Lincoln 
school, which makes it difficult to compare the standard 
reached by a given grade with that reached in other schools. 
The use of such "standard" measures as have already been 
described will serve to remedy this difficulty. 

When it is stated that at the beginning of the present year 
these fourth graders did not even know their "table of 
two's," it will not be surprising to observe in CHART III 



146 



that they were still unable to do long division to the extent 
of taking the standard tests in that subject as late as De- 
cember. 20. 

More encouraging conditions are found in some of the 
other grades, — excepting addition, in which all are seen to 
be rather weak. The work of the seventh grade may partic- 
ularly be noted as showing excellent progress in all opera- 
tions but multiplication where speed has been increased 
without corresponding increase in accuracy. 

Chart IV 

Standings of Upper Five Grades in Four Funda- 
mentals in Arithmetic on October 18 and on 
December 20, With Standings We Should 
Strive to Reach 



Addition 

Speed Oct. 18 3.9 6.5 

Speed Dec. 20 4.7 7.4 

Standard Speed 7.3 8.6 

Accuracy Oct. 18 26% 43% 

Accuracy Dec. 20 40 40 

Standard Accuracy 63 70 

Subtraction 

Speed Oct. 18 4.2 7.0 

Speed Dec. 20 4.9 7.9 

Standard Speed 7.3 9.0 

Accuracy Oct. 18 32 c /c 62% 

Accuracy Dec. 20 40 55 

Standard Accuracy 80 84 



7.6 
9.2 
9.8 

45% 

40 

73 



10.2 
10.2 
10.3 

65% 

70 

86 



7.2 

9.7 

10.9 

52% 

55 

75 



9.3 
11.0 
11.7 

77% 

75 

87 



8.0 

8.8 

11.6 

50% 

65 

77 



9.0 
11.5 
12.9 

70% 
84 



147 



Multiplication 

Speed Oct. 18 2.9 6.5 

Speed Dec. 20 3.4 7.2 

Standard Speed 6.2 7.5 

Accuracy Oct. 18 30' i 53% 

Accuracy Dec. 20 40 57 

Standard Accuracy 67 75 

Division 

Speed Oct. 18 4.4 

Speed Dec. 20 

Standard Speed 4.7 6.1 

Accuracy Oct. 18 68%> 

Accuracy Dec. 20 53 

Standard Accuracy 57% 77 



8.0 


9.0 


9.6 


8.7 


10.0 


11.2 


9.1 


10.2 


11.5 


56% 


67% 


73% 




60 


75 


78 


80 


81 


5.8 


8.2 


8.5 


7.6 


11.5 


10.5 


S.2 


9.7 


10.7 


80%, 


77% 




60 


85 


87 


87 


90 


91 



Speed=Xumber of problems completed in given time. 

Standard Speed = Xumber of problems we should strive to complete 

in given time. 
Accuracy=Per cent, of problems completed which were right. 
Standard Accuracy=Per cent, of problems completed which we should 

have right 



CHART IV gives the same information as CHART III 
but in numerical form. Though not as striking of itself it 
will serve to supplement the impression obtained from the 
graphic presentation of the conditions. It should be re- 
membered, however, that the figures are only roughly ac- 
curate. 

These charts treat only of the standing of the five upper 
grades of the grammar school in the so-called "four funda- 
mental operations." But if properly instructed in these 
fundamentals it is fairly simple to teach their application 
in the problem work of the arithmetic of these grades. — 
more especially in these days when so many non-essentials 
of the old-fashioned catch-problem, mental-gymnastics type 
are being dropped from our requirements. 



148 

English — History — Geography 

At the opening of the present term on January 7 we were 
still awaiting outlines of a course in English prepared at 
Concord last year. These outlines map out the instruction 
from the first grade through the high school. They are 
being used in Concord High School; and since it is, of 
course, desirable that the pupils who go from Lincoln to 
that school have preparation which will meet the require- 
ments there, we are practically obliged to use these outlines. 
We do so, however, under protest for the following reason : 

They demand technical grammar, which, as most modern 
educators agree, has no place in the elementary school. 

The elementary school should teach how to speak and 
write correctly, and speaking and writing correctly are hab- 
its acquired by constant practice. The correct speaker does 
not say, 4 Tt is I," as the result of having thought before- 
hand that : "I" is a pronoun in the nominative case, follow- 
ing the copulative, intransitive verb, "is." He says, "It is 
I'" because that has become his habit, acquired by constant 
use of the correct form. Xo memorizing of rules for pred- 
icate nominatives after copulative verbs would ever have 
given him that accuracy. The "grammatical axioms" neces- 
sary to make children see why some of their usages are 
wrong are few and should be simple. 

Why, then, is technical grammar present in this outline in 
sufficient amount to call for protests? One answer is that 
the history of our school system, dating from the days when 
the grammar school was so-called because its major interest 
was Latin and Latin grammar, has caused us to accept tech- 
nical grammar as a tradition. Another reason is because 
high school teachers of foreign languages, ignoring the 
question of its suitability in the elementary grades, de- 
mand it because, thev sav, it will make their work easier. 



149 

Let me quote Prof. Burges Johnson of Vassar College on 
the last point : 

" 'But,' said a teacher only yesterday — a woman occupy- 
ing the position of assistant principal in a large elementary 
school — 'how are my pupils to study Latin later on if they 
have not learned English by the grammatical method?' In 
other words, if my baby does not learn to walk by means 
of a balancing-rod along a crack in the floor, how can I 
teach him later in life to advance on the tight- rope?" 

He says again in the same essay, Grammar, the Bane of 
Boyhood: "Here is a curious thing to contemplate: rules of 
technical grammar which are necessary for the mastery of 
Latin, because it is a dead language of fixed regularity, are 
not taught in Latin but in English." 

The fact remains that our situation will make it neces- 
sary to conform to the Concord outline as soon as copies 
are available to us. At present the outline used in the 
Toledo, Ohio, schools is being followed in the lower grades. 

In History we have been using the outline of the courses 
given in the model University of Chicago Elementary 
School. Slight changes have been made to adapt this to 
our requirements. 

Mr. Lyman's well-planned outlines in geography continue 
to guide our work in that field. 

Spelling — Drawing — Music 

There is need of standardization of Spelling throughout 
the school, in order that the instruction may progress sys- 
tematically. Your superintendent has had opportunity to 
make a bare beginning at this. Much still remains to be 
done. The Boston Spelling Lists which Miss Keith, on her 
own initiative, has been using in grade four, might serve as 
a beginning for this standardization. 



150 

The teachers have been instructed to permit children who 
were doing work for the Red Cross to devote the usual 
drawing periods to this service, if they wished. This was in 
no way intended as a substitute for more organized Red 
Cross activities. Plans for a Junior Red Cross chapter are 
now going forward in such a way that they will not be dis- 
turbed by my resignation. The conviction that Red Cross 
work well clone was as valuable to the pupil as his drawing 
caused the permission. 

In Music we have made big changes, this year. Using 
the phonograph to bring to us whatever we needed, your 
superintendent has personally taken charge of instructing 
the seventh and eighth grades in the appreciation of music. 
The purpose of this change was to substitute for at least a 
part of the "do-ra-mi-fa-sol" system for teaching "music," 
instruction in what good music was, what some of its forms 
were like, what it can say, how it says it, — or, in a phrase, 
how to like it. Such a change means more teaching of 
music and less teaching of hieroglyphics, it will be conceded. 

Cooking — Sewing — Manual Training 

Mrs. Joslin, formerly Miss Wilson, has adapted her 
instruction in Cooking to war conditions. In the fall em- 
phasis was laid on the various methods of canning. Since 
then war recipes calling for molasses instead of sugar; and 
corn meal, rye flour or graham flour instead of the more 
precious white flour, have been taught. 

The cooking has been greatly handicapped by the lack 
of proper stoves. The old-fashioned oil stoves with which 
the school is now equipped are hazardous and uncertain at 
best. Up-to-date stoves should be substituted for these. 

In the teaching of Sewing, Mrs. Smith has been able to 
include much work for the Red Cross without lowering the 
instructive value of the courses. The policy of supplying 



151 

to the pupils the materials they needed for their work in- 
stead of requiring them to buy it themselves was introduced 
this year and has proved more satisfactory to all concerned. 

Later pages dealing with changes in the building will 
speak of the removal of the Manual Training from the room 
formerly occupied to quarters in the basement. Mr. Brack- 
ett had on hand sufficient materials at the begining of the 
year to make large purchases unnecessary. As a result, the 
outlay for this department is less, this year, than normally. 
When a chapter of the Junior Red Cross has been organized 
at the school it is likely that much of the manual training 
work will be for the Red Cross, insofar as that may be done 
without lowering the instructive value of the work. 

Some Needs in the Near Future 

It had been one of our plans that we should have a mov- 
ing picture machine of the type which use non-inflammable 
films, need no special operator, and meet with the approval 
of the fire underwriters for use under those conditions, for 
increasing the efficiency of the instruction in geography, 
history, nature study, and to a more limited degree litera- 
ture. The favorable attitude of your committee and the 
great interest of parents and teachers convince me that this 
plan would have materialized were it not that my enlistment 
is soon to take me from Lincoln. The initial expense would 
be about $225, with an annual expense, thereafter, of $150 
for the rental of five films weekly. The films which have 
been prepared especially for school use number in the hun- 
dreds and are being used for bettering the instruction in 
many of the Boston schools as well as other schools through- 
out the state and country. The number available is increas- 
ing daily. It is your superintendent's hope that this form 
of visual instruction may soon be made available to the 
Lincoln pupils. 



152 

A great need of the Lincoln Center school which cannot 
be met by purchase in any market is school spirit. There 
is a lack of pride, a lack of feeling of personal responsibility 
and a general disinterest in the welfare of the school as 
a whole which not only lowers classroom efficiency but 
"playground and street efficiency." It means, in short, poor 
civic morale. We are a disunited school unit, and the chief 
reason is that we have no place of assembly as a school. 
We need badly an assembly hall. 

It was your superintendent's plan to use the room in 
which the manual training was formerly located for as- 
sembling the four upper grades on Monday mornings and 
the four lower grades on some other morning of the week. 
It would be necessary to secure benches of the type in use 
at the town hall to do this, however, and these are not 
now available unless we purchase. To gather the school in 
one room, opening the week with the reading of a short 
passage from the Bible, singing The Star Spangled Banner, 
repeating the Lord's Prayer, and then listening, perhaps, to 
a five or ten minute talk from some adult with something 
worth-while to say would do wonders in developing the 
esprit de corps we now lack. 

Our High School Pupils 

Interesting information regarding the comparative stand- 
ings of the Lincoln pupils at Concord High School and all 
other pupils attending there is given in CHART V below. 
This chart was completed from all marks issued at the Con- 
cord school for the month of November. From the total 
of all classes it is to be seen Lincoln pupils received a higher 
per cent, of passing marks during that month than did the 
other pupils at the school. 



153 

Chart V 

Graphic Presentation of Distribution of Scholar- 
ship Marks for November at Concord High 
School 



M 



* 


j 


» 
^ 


§ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


SB 


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154 

In the same manner, the freshmen and senior classes 
from Lincoln excel the freshman and senior classes attend- 
ing Concord High School from Concord and other towns. 
The sophomores, on the other hand, to . a lesser and the 
juniors to a greater degree fall behind their Concord 
classmates. 

In reading CHART V the black areas represent marks 
below passing. The white areas, then, contain the passing 
marks; and the town which has the greatest total of white 
area has the greatest per cent, of total passing marks. 
CHART VI below gives the actual percentages on which 
CHART V was based. 

Chart VI 

Distribution of Scholarship Marks for November 

at Concord High School 

V. P. F. G. E. 

Freshmen 

Lincoln 0.0% 4.3% 36.2% 48.9% 10.6% 

Concord 0.2 15.4 46.6 31.4 6.4 

Sophomores 

Lincoln 0.0 20.4 36.4 43.2 0.0 

Concord 0.6 18.8 43.4 34.3 2.9 

Juniors 

Lincoln 0.0 15.4 61.5 23.1 0.0 

Concord 0.0 8.9 45.2 42.2 3.7 

Seniors 

Lincoln 0.0 0.0 45.2 51.6 ■ 3.2 

Concord 0.0 5.7 35.6 54.5 4.2 

All Classes 

Lincoln 0.0 10.1 42.6 43.2 4.1 

Concord 0.2 12.6 43.2 39.5 4.5 

V=Very poor. P.=Poor. Both are below passing. 



155 

Your superintendent has, this year, endeavored to give 
the Lincoln pupils attending Concord and Waltham High 
Schools some supervision from their home town. This 
work early made it clear that even a very little encourage- 
ment and assistance would serve to help many of them 
greatly. Several have availed themselves regularly of help 
offered, stopping at the Lincoln Center School on their 
way home from Concord. A great handicap in this work 
was the absence of any lighting system in the Center School. 
Once or twice an attempt was made to light the blackboard 
in one of the rooms with an oil lamp, but this was given up. 
Thereafter your superintendent went to the home of the 
pupil who wished assistance when they could no longer 
see to work at the school. It is much to be regretted that 
a building otherwise comparatively up-to-date should be so 
antiquated in the detail of complete absence of an artificial 
lighting system. 

Transportation to and from Concord and Waltham has 
furnished a serious problem for our high school pupils, this 
year. With the railroad service so completely demoralized 
that it is not uncommon for trains to be two hours or more 
late, we must bear in mind the possibility or even the prob- 
ability that we shall have to furnish another form of trans- 
portation in the near future. It would not be much more 
expensive to purchase and operate an automobile bus -than 
it is now to pay railroad fares. Certainly the service would 
be better. The experience of the town of Chelmsford as 
reported by Superintendent Putney in the January number 
of the American School Board Journal will indicate what 
can be done even when it is necessary to hire a chauffeur on 
full time for the work. In Lincoln this would not be neces- 
sary as chauffeur, repair service and supply service could 
all be contracted for with the local garage. 



156 

Like the elementary school pupils, the Lincoln high 
school pupils are lacking in a feeling of unity. They re- 
gard themselves as Concord or Waltham students with no 
further responsibilities towards this town. The condition 
is, of course, the natural one in the circumstances of their 
attendance on Concord and Waltham schools. 

Perhaps the most effective way of combatting this is to 
organize them here at home into some sort of unit which 
will keep alive their sense of belonging to Lincoln and 
their interest and pride in Lincoln. It was your superin- 
tendent's plan to make an effort in this direction by initiat- 
ing a social organization backed by the parents which would 
meet regularly in an informal way and provide the social 
good times which are at present so rare among the young 
people of the town. He is obliged to leave this to the 
parents or to his successor, with the hope that its import- 
ance may be understood clearly enough to forbid its being 
pushed aside and forgotten. 

Over-Age Pupils 

In CHART VII, which appears below, the ages and 
grades of all Lincoln elementary and high school pupils are 
given. They deserve close attention for several reasons, 
chief of which is the high per cent, of over-age pupils 
which the figures reveal. 



157 





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First, a word of explanation. The numbers opposite any 
given grade indicate the number of pupils in that grade of 



158 

various ages. For instance : in Grade I there were on Sep- 
tember 1, one boy and four girls who were five years of 
age, 12 boys and eight girls who were six years of age, and 
four boys who were seven years of age. The letters B and 
G at the heads of the columns indicate respectively, Boys 
and Girls. The black lines enclose all pupils who are of 
what we may call normal age, for which two years are al- 
lowed in each grade. For instance, in the first grade pupils 
of five or six are classed as normal ; in the second grade pu- 
pils of six and seven ; and so on. 

Of the 162 elementary school pupils listed, 57 are over 
the normal age for their grade and one is below the normal 
age. This means 35.4% are over-age — better than one in 
three. The per cent, of over-age pupils in the city of Rock- 
land, Maine, last year was only 17.9%, — about one-half as 
great. Of these over-age Lincoln pupils, 32 were one year 
over the normal age, 20 were two years, four were three 
years, and one was six years. This means a wastage of 
90 pupil years in our little school. It means that if none 
of these pupils is held back further and if none is discour- 
aged and drops out of school as a result, a total of 90 
years of earning power has been completely lost and a total 
of 90 years of added expense for instruction in our schools 
put in its place. So important an item as this should be 
enough to convince us of the vital necessity of eliminating 
as much as possible of this wastage by the efficiency of our 
instruction and the closer adaptation of our school work to 
the personal needs of the pupil. We could reasonably ex- 
pect in time to cut this loss in half. 

Of the 38 high school pupils, 15 were over-age, which is 
39.5%, or two out of five. Nine of these were one year 
over-age, three were two years and three were three years. 



159 

The Homes and the School 

So far this report has answered the first three questions 
it set for itself. The fourth was : How have the Lincoln 
school interests been made Lincoln home interests? The 
answer is that only rudimentary progress has been made 
in that direction, but that this has been progress, we think, 
of the right sort. 

On Monday, November 19, the parents were invited to 
the school for an informal meeting with the teachers. This 
was preceded by a brief talk on the work in musical appre- 
ciation we are doing in the upper grades. Following this 
opportunity was given for conferences with the teachers on 
the work individual sons and daughters were doing. 

Again on Monday, December 17, the parents were in- 
vited to meet with the teachers. Most unfortunately this 
meeting could not be held at the school because of the 
absence of lighting there. It was held in the lower town hall, 
instead, and a motion picture machine for school use was 
demonstrated and explained. This meeting also included 
opportunity for conferences with tjie teachers. The fact 
that the school records were not at hand, as they would 
have been could the meeting have been held at the school, 
proved somewhat of a handicap. 

It is most desirable that these meetings be continued and 
their attendance increased. It is the parents who know 
the children, and only as they strive to impart this knowl- 
edge to the teacher are they doing their best for the school 
interests of the child. In the same way the teachers could 
give the parents interesting information Concerning the chil- 
dren as scholars. Such exchanges make for added efficiency 
both in school and in home by making these interests coop- 
erate rather than, as they often do, conflict. 

It would be well, too, if more fathers could be actively 
interested in the work of their children in the schools. 



160 

There should also be some effort to organize the fathers and 
mothers of pupils attending high school from Lincoln in 
the interests of closer cooperation with the teachers at 
Concord and Waltham. 

Our Teaching Staff 

It will be seen from CHART VIII that our situation in 
the Lincoln Center School as regards the average number 
of pupils per teacher is most favorable when compared with 
the situation in the 22 cities and towns located about us. 
In CHART VIII, "median," it will be remembered from 
the explanation of CHART II, means that score which 
stands in the middle with as many scores better as there 
are poorer. The quartile medians are the scores which 
stand in the middle of the better half and in the middle of 
the poorer half of the group. Lincoln, with an average of 
26 pupils per teacher, it will be observed, stands in the 
upper quarter of this group of cities and towns. 



161 

Chart VIII 

Pupils Per Teacher in Lincoln and Surrounding 
Towns, in Order of Their Rank 

Weston 23 

Carlisle 23 

Sudbury 25 

*Lincoln 26 

Wellesley 27 

Wayland Quartile Median 30 

Acton 31 

Waltham 32 

Concord 32 

Winchester 34 

Stow 35 

Billerica Median 36 

Bedford 37 

Belmont 37 

Framingham 37 

Wilmington 38 

Maynard 39 

Arlington Qnatrile Median 39 

W r atertown 40 

Medford 42 

Lexington 43 

Needham 43 

Natick 45 

*At opening of winter term, Jan. 7, 1918. 

It will be interesting in this and the charts which follow 
to compare the standings of Lincoln and Weston. Both are 
towns of unusual rank. Thev should be rivals for first 



162 

place among the towns of the state in their educational pro- 
visions as well as in their civic management. 

The current school year in Lincoln opened with five full- 
time teachers teaching eight grades. The seventh and 
eighth grades, numbering 30, were in one room under Miss 
Strong. The fifth and sixth grades, numbering 46, were in 
one room under Miss Tyler. The second and third grades 
were in one room under Miss Bowker and numbered 29. 
The fourth grade with 27 pupils and the first grade with 29 
were by themselves, in charge respectively of Miss Keith 
and Miss Heath. 

It was soon clear that the overcrowded condition of the 
fifth and sixth grades must be remedied if anything like 
efficient work was to be done. At a meeting of your com- 
mittee held Wednesday, October 24, the situation was pre- 
sented and the conclusion reached that the manual training 
must be removed to a basement room to make possible a 
division of the two grades. The employment of a new 
teacher was authorized to take the sixth grade pupils, Miss 
Tyler preferring to keep her fifth grade. 

On the afternoon of the same day the contractor was on 
hand to measure the basement room to be fitted for manual 
training. The following morning the lumber was at the 
school, and on Monday, October 29, three school days later, 
Miss Jennie Wheaton was teaching the sixth grade in their 
new room, and the manual training had been shifted. 

Our full-time teachers, in order of seniority of service in 
Lincoln, are as follows : 

Miss Hattie Heath, graduate of Quincy Training School, now teach- 
ing her 20th year in Lincoln, Grade I. 

Miss Helen Bowker, graduate of Fitchburg Normal Special and 
Concord Training School course, now since her resignation at Christ- 
mas, Mrs. Frank Burrill, teaching her fifth year at Lincoln at time of 
her resignation. Grades II and III. 



163 

Miss Helen Strong, graduate of Tilton Seminary and Framingham 
Normal, now teaching her third year at Lincoln. Grades VII and 
VIII. 

Miss Gladys Tyler, graduate of Bridge-water Normal, now teaching 
her second year in Lincoln. Formerly Grades V and VI ; now Grade V. 

Miss Georgianna Keith, graduate of Lowell Normal three-year 
course, teaching her first year in Lincoln. Grade IV. 

Miss Jennie Wheaton. graduate of Framingham Normal, teaching 
her first year in Lincoln. Began service October 29. Formerly Grade 
VI ; now Grades II and III. 

Miss Anna Strid, graduate of Bridgewater Normal and Palmer 
School of Penmanship, teaching her first year in Lincoln. Began 
service January 7. Grade VI. 

Special Problems Resulting from Building 

This brings us to question six of those which this report 
aims to answer : In what way has the Lincoln Center school 
building presented problems and how have they been met? 

Our first problem was lack of room. All of the six class- 
rooms in the building were in use at the beginning of the 
year, and another was necessary if we were to divide 
grades V and VI. How this problem was solved by pre- 
paring a basement room for the manual training and using 
the room formerly devoted to this work for grade VI has 
already been explained. We are still lacking in room, how- 
ever, and our present need i> an assembly hall. This prob- 
lem has already been discussed in our discussion of the 
needs of the elementary school children. 

Another problem was the poor system of lighting. All 
rooms are lighted by the unilateral system, — that is, the 
windows are placed in one wall of the room. In every 
case this wall is on the south. Direct sunlight, as a result, 
enters the classroom at all hours on clear days, and direct 
sunlight, unfortunately, causes serious strains when re- 
flected from desks and walls and books into the pupils' 
eves. The alternative, on clear davs, is to lower the cur- 



164 



tains enough to keep the direct rays from reaching these 
desks, walls or books, and again eye-strain results from 
the darkened condition of the room. 

It was not, of course, possible for us to correct this con- 
dition by adding windows at the back of the room or by 
making the unilateral lighting come from the north side 
where there would be less direct sunlight! Our solution 
had to accept conditions as they were and build upon them. 
After some experimenting, it was decided to apply a ma- 
terial known as "white frosting" to the upper halves of the 
windows. This gave a ground glass effect, admitting the 
light but diffusing it. It was thus possible to light the 
rooms properly on sunny days by raising the curtains from 
the bottom of. the windows to cut off the direct sunlight 
through the lower sash, while diffused light entered through 
the frosted upper sashes. To the teachers who had to 
partly face these windows the white glare proved especially 
trying. This was remedied as far as possible by lowering 
the curtains at the bottom of the windows as soon as the 
sun was high enough, and drawing the upper curtains over 
the frosted sash. 

Your superintendent has already told of his efforts to 
light the blackboard in one of the classrooms by means of 
an oil lamp in order to see while giving help to high school 
pupils. The same system of lighting is necessitated in his 
office on dark days and during the late afternoon, and in 
the boiler room in the early morning and the late afternoon. 
This has been another of our serious problems. We should 
have electricity put into the building at once. It is needed 
for the reasons mentioned above. It is needed if the build- 
ing, which must be heated 24 hours each day, is to be used 
for any other than the most limited classroom activities. 
And it is needed if we are to install the inexpensive, reliable 
type of clock which your committee has in mind to replace 



165 

those now in use which are frequently out of running order 
and which are rather expensive to repair. 

A change which it would be well to bear in mind to make 
at an early opportunity would be the removal of the glass 
now used in the doors of the various classrooms. An 
article in the December issue of the American School Board 
Journal says : "A glass door is objectionable for other 
reasons than its continual menace to the safety of teacher 
and child. It renders impossible the schoolroom privacy so 
essential to accomplishing the best work." The same article 
says a few lines further on, "Perhaps the most tantalizing 
of all the outside interruption, is the practice of acrobatic 
stunts in the corridor by the older boys." And such things, 
be it said, will happen in the best regulated families ! 

The best argument against the use of glass in the school- 
room door is the danger of injury to pupil or teacher if it 
is broken. Cases of the sort have occurred and have meant 
damage suits against the town. 

"When the need of light in a corridor," the article in the 
American School Board Journal concludes, "is imperative, 
it can be transmitted by means of frosted wire glass. Most 
of the new school buildings have their corridors lighted 
electrically." 

Lincoln was, unfortunately, no exception to the general 
rule that the unusual cold of the Christmas holidays was 
expensive to the schools through frozen plumbing. This 
was despite the fact that more coal was burned than during 
any similar period while school was in session during the 
current year. It would be wise, next year, in the interests 
of both coal and plumbing conservation to drain all pipes 
at the beginning of the Christmas vacation, empty the 
boilers and draw the fires. 

On September 20 of the current year all the fire hose 
with which each floor of the building is equipped was tested 



166 

under full pressure and found to be in good condition. It 
is urged that this hose should be tested yearly at the begin- 
ning of the year. The trial in September was the first 
which had been made since its installation. 

Fire drills were held without previous warning to pupils 
or teachers on the following dates, emptying the building 
completely in the times given : — 

October 8, 1 min. 5 sec. 
November 8, 50 sec. 
January 18, 45 sec. 

Pyrene extinguishers have been ordered for each floor 
for use, if needed, for smaller blazes when use of the large 
fire hose might cause unnecessary damage from water. 

Our Financial Situation 

The last of the seven questions which this report aims to 
answer relates to our financial situation. CHART IX will 
give a first impression of our financial ability in terms of 
actual assessed valuation per capita in Lincoln and sur- 
rounding towns. The median, it will be remembered again, 
is the mid-measure of the group, and the quartile medians 
are the mid-measures of the upper and lower halves of the 
group. 



167 

Chart IX 

Per Capita Wealth of Lincoln and Surrounding 
Towns, in Order of Their Rank 

Weston $5,446 

Wellesley 3,390 

Lincoln 3,233 

Winchester 1,974 

Lexington 1,845 

Billerica Quartile Median 1,781 

Wayland 1,671 

Belmont 1,581 

Bedford 1,568 

Concord 1,551 

Xeedham 1,485 

Sudbury Median 1,394 

Arlington 1,308 

Watcrtown 1,290 

Carlisle 1,238 

Framingham 1,219 

Acton 1,171 

Waltham Quartile Median 1.101 

Medford 1,093 

Stow 1,030 

Wilmington 940 

Xatick 864 

Maynard 631 

With a per capita wealth of $3,233 Lincoln stands third 
among the 23 cities and towns in this immediate vicinity. 
It is over five times as wealthy as Maynard with its $631 
per capita. Weston, with nine times the wealth of May- 
nard, stands at the head of the list. 



168 

Since school finances depend, however, on the wealth per 
pupil in the schools and since a large proportion of school 
children in the total population makes this sometimes differ 
widely from the situation shown by per capita wealth tables, 
CHART X will more accurately reveal our financial stand- 
ing for school purposes. CHART X shows these same 
towns arranged in the order of actual assessed valuation 
per pupil in grammar and high schools. 

Chart X 

Per Pupil Wealth of Lincoln and Surrounding 

Towns, in Order of Their Rank 

Weston $37,849 

Lincoln 26,804 

Wellesley 20,436 

Bedford 13,631 

Winchester 11,729 

Waltham Ouartile Median 11,022 

Wayland 10,517 

Carlisle 9,629 

Sudbury 9,605 

Belmont 9,016 

Lexington 8,602 

Acton Median 8,597 

Concord 8,522 

Watertown 8,410 

Billerica 8,365 

Needham 7,719 

Framingham 6,955 

Arlington .... Ouartile Median 6,667 

Medford 5,891 

Stow 5,607 

Natick 5,145 

Wilmington 4,219 

Maynard 3,537 



169 

In this chart Lincoln stands second as a result of the fact 
that its proportion of school children to the total popula- 
tion is smaller than Wellesley's. Compared with Maynard 
its position is also more favorable than as shown in 
CHART IX. Lincoln has over seven times as much tax- 
able property from which to provide for the education of 
each child in her schools as has Maynard. Weston has 
over 10 times as much as Maynard. 

Compare Lincoln, however, with Acton, — the median or 
middle city listed in CHART X, neither an extreme of 
wealth or of poverty. Lincoln is three times as wealthy, in 
terms of wealth per pupil. An appropriation for school 
purposes equal per thousand of valuation to that of Acton 
would, then, bring us three times as much money per pupil. 
The same is true as regards the comparison between Lin- 
coln and Lexington. 

Remembering these figures and turning to CHART XI, 
below, it will at once be clear why the schools of Lincoln 
have been so light a burden upon the tax-payers of Lincoln 
and how greatly that burden could be increased before we 
would be carrying the same load as Watertown, even, — the 
lower quartile median of the towns surrounding us. Lex- 
ington is an example of what the taxpayer is called upon 
to pay in the middle-ranking town of the 23 in this imme- 
diate vicinity. 

Since, then, we can expand our school appropriation 
$1.09 per thousand and still stand very near the bottom of 
the list of towns about us, we should be ready to listen 
favorably to any request for improvement in our school sys- 
tem which offered a reasonable educational return at least 
until compliance with such a request seemed more likely to 
take us out of this favorable group of towns having low 
tax rates for school purposes than at present. 



170 

Chart XI 

Tax for School Purposes Per $1,000 Actual Valu- 
ation in Lincoln and Surrounding Towns, 
in Order of Their Rank 

Maynard $8.91 

Wilmington 8 . 06 

Acton 6.98 

Xatick 6.51 

Arlington 6. 10 

Stow Quartile Median 6.05 

Medfofd 5.84 

Concord 5 . 50 

Xeedham 5 . 39 

Framingham 5 . 34 

Sudbury 5.31 

Lexington Median 5.17 

Wayland 5.12 

Billerica 4.82 

Bedford 4.74 

Carlisle 4.49 

Waltham 4.45 

Watertown Quartile Median 4.43 

Belmont 4.39 

Winchester 4.32 

Lincoln 3 . 34 

Wellesley 3 . 07 

Weston 2 . 47 

Our apportionment of school expenditures for the year 
ending June 30, 1917, compared with the eight Massachu- 
setts towns most nearly like Lincoln in population and not 
supporting high schools is shown in CHART XII, below. 
The items worth noting are the following : — 



171 

A smaller proportion of the Lincoln appropriation was 
applied to actual instruction than of the appropriations of 
any of these towns except North Reading. This is ex- 
plained by the fact that only one other devotes as large a 
per cent, of its appropriation to transportation as we do. 
That town is Sunderland and the per cent, is 30. Lincoln is 
also next to the highest in per cent, of appropriation de- 
voted to tuition in other schools, with 21 per cent. Geo- 
graphical conditions which cannot be met efficiently in any 
other way at present are responsible for this condition in 
Lincoln. 



172 



Chart XII 
Apportionment of School Funds in Lincoln and 
Towns of Approximately the Same Popu- 
lation Not Supporting High Schools 



<u o 

Westwood 4 r /r 

Bedford 5 

Southwick 10 

Mattapoisett .... 6 

Lincoln 4 

Middleton 4 

North Reading. . . 3 

West Brookfield. 7 

Sunderland 5 



Oc/2 



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437c 

41 

63 

53 

35 

40 

33 

41 

40 



14% 
19 

9 
20 
.9 
14 

9 
15 
14 



1% 



2% 
2 



16% 
12 
9 
19 
30 
23 
25 
20 
30 



20% 
21 

8 

21 
19 
29 
16 
10 



General Control=Sala"ries, expenses and business office of school com- 
mittee and superintendent's salary and office expenses. 

Instruction=Salaries of teachers, supervisors and principals, text 
books, stationery, supplies, etc. 

Operation of School Plant=Janitor service, fuel, repairs, replacements 
and upkeep, etc. 

Health promotion is self-explanatory. 

Transportation and tuition are total of all transportation and tuition 
charges, elementary and secondary school. 



We must remember, in noting this fact, then, that in 
appropriating for the schools about half of our .money is 
going to other expenses than tuition and instruction, that 
the scattered population of the town is responsible, that 
there is at present no remedy which would save money and 
at the same time give as efficient instruction, and finally that 
we must appropriate generously enough to provide for this 
condition. 



173 

The per cent, distribution of the Lincoln expenditures for 
school purposes during the year ending Dec. 31, 1917 are 
as follows : 

General control — 6 per cent. 
Instruction — 33 per cent. 
Operation of school plant — 9 per cent. 
Health promotion — 1 per cent. 
Miscellaneous — 1 per cent. 
Transportation — 27 per cent. 
Tuition — 22 per cent. 

In Conclusion 

The foregoing pages have, it is hoped, answered the 
seven questions set for them. It is hoped that they have 
also made it clear that we need, can afTord, and should 
have as early as possible : 

A school nurse. 

A properly levelled playground that the elementary 
school girls may be interested at recesses in some form of 
organized out-of-door activity. 

A teacher for each grade whenever the grades become 
large enough to make that practicable. 

New oil stoves for the cooking room. 

A moving picture machine for the teaching of geog- 
raphy, history, nature study and literature. 

An assembly hall, or benches with which to make an 
impromptu one of the present sixth grade room. 

Electric lights for the school building. 

I am glad to be able to sign myself, 

PRIVATE THOMAS E. BENNER, 
S. E. R. C, Aviation Section, U. S. Army, 
Superintendent of Schools. 



175 



WARRANT 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To cither of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln, in 
said County : 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
\<>u are hereby required to notify the legal voters of said 
Town of Lincoln, qualified to vote at Town Meeting for 
the transaction of Town affairs, to meet in the Town Hall, 
in said Lincoln, on Monday, the fourth day of March next, 
at 11 :30 o'clock A. M., by posting a copy of this Warrant 
by you attested, in each of the Post Offices and in some 
other public place in said Town, seven days at least before 
said fourth day of March, then and there to act upon the 
following Articles : 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot will be open at 
12 o'clock noon and may be closed at 6:30 o'clock P. M. 

ARTICLE 1. To choose a Moderator. 



176 

ART. 2. To bring in their votes for the following 
Town Officers, and any other officers required by law to be 
elected by ballot or otherwise, also any committees, com- 
missioners and trustees. 

Three Selectmen — one for three years, one for two years, 
and one for one year. 

One member of the Board of Assessors for three years. 

One member of the Board of Health for three years. 

One Treasurer for one year. 

One Collector for one year. 

One Auditor for one year. 

Two Constables for one year. 

One Tree Warden for one year. 

One member of the Trust Fund Commissioners for three 
years. 

One member of Trustees for Free Public Lectures for 
three years. 

One member of the School Committee for three years. 

One member of the Board of Water Commissioners for 
three years. 

One member of the Board of Cemetery Commissioners 
for three years. 

Also to vote "Yes" or "No" upon the following ques- 
tion : "Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in this Town?" 

ART. 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committee, Commissioners and Trustees. 



177 

ART. 4. To appropriate money for necessary and ex- 
pedient purposes of the Town and enact anything in rela- 
tion to the same. 



ART. 5. To determine the manner of collecting" taxes 
for the ensuing year. 



ART. 6. To determine the compensation of the Col- 
lector of Taxes for the ensuing year. 



ART. 7. To see if the Town will authorize the Treas- 
urer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow during 
the municipal year, beginning February 1, 1918, in antici- 
pation of the collection of taxes for the said year, such 
sums of money as may be necessary for the current ex- 
penses of the Town, but not exceeding the total tax levy 
for the said year, giving the notes of the Town in payment 
therefor payable in one year from the date thereof. All 
debts incurred under authority of this vote shall be paid 
from taxes of the present municipal year. 



ART. 8. To see if the Town will choose a Committee 
on Claims under the provisions of Section 3, Article 6 of 
the Bv-Laws. 



ART. 9. To see if the Town will take steps to discon- 
tinue the light on certain streets. 



ART. 10. To see what action the Town will take with 
reference to the old schoolhouse in the center of the Town. 



178 

HEREOF FAIL NOT 

And make due return of this Warrant, with your doings 
thereon," to the Town Clerk at or before the time for the 
meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this nineteenth day of February, 
in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and 
eighteen. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



179 



By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, ss 

At the Superior Court, within and for the County 

of Middlesex, Anno Domini, 1897. 



The following By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln, in said 
County, are presented to this Court for approval, to wit: — 

"ARTICLE I. 

Town Meetings. 

Section 1. The annual town meeting shall be held on 
the first Monday of March in each year. 

Sect. 2. Xotice of every town meeting shall be given In- 
posting copies of the warrant calling the same, attested by 
the officer making service thereof, in each of the post-offices 
within the town, and in one of the churches, or one other 
public place, within the town, not less than seven days be- 
fore the day appointed for such meeting. But when, in the 
judgment of the selectmen, the interests of the town require 
a meeting to be held without giving so long a notice, a 
meeting may be called by posting attested copies of the 
warrant in the places above mentioned, and by leaving a 
printed copy thereof at each dwelling-house within the 



180 

town, at least three days before the time appointed for the 
meeting; provided that in such cases the selectmen shall 
certify that, in their opinion, the interests of the town re- 
quire that a town meeting be called upon a notice of less 
than seven days, which certificate shall be made upon, or 
attached to, the original warrant, and shall be served as a 
part thereof. 



ARTICLE II. 

Finances. 

Section 1. The financial year shall commence with the 
first day of February and end with the thirty-first day of 
January annually. 

Sect. 2. The town treasurer shall have the custody of 
all funds belonging to the town except sinking funds, trust 
funds and funds for which other provision is made by law ; 
and he shall pay no money from the treasury except upon a 
draft signed by a majority of the selectmen, stating the 
account to which the same is chargeable. Such draft shall 
be sufficient authority to the treasurer to pay the same, and 
the payment thereof shall discharge him from all liability 
on account of the money so paid. 

Sect. 3. The water commissioners and all other boards, 
committees and officers shall, on the first day of each month, 
pay to the town treasurer all sums collected by them the 
month previous to the custody of which the treasurer is 
entitled. 

Sect. 4. A majority of the water commissioners, school 
committee, or of any board, or committee, and any officer 
having charge of the expenditure of an appropriation, shall 



181 

approve in writing all accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls 
properly chargeable to such appropriation, and shall trans- 
mit the same with his or their approval to the selectmen. 
All other accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls shall be ex- 
amined by the selectmen and, if proper, shall be approved 
by them. The selectmen shall label all accounts, claims, 
bills and pay-rolls which have been approved either by 
themselves or by the other officers before mentioned, and 
shall keep a record thereof in a book kept for the purpose, 
stating the persons to whom payable, the amounts and 
dates thereof, and the funds, or appropriations, from which 
the same are payable. 

Sect. 5. Drafts signed by a majority of the selectmen, 
stating the accounts to which the same are chargeable, 
shall be drawn upon the treasurer for the payment of all 
sums by law payable from the treasury to the common- 
wealth or county, final judgments of courts, bonds, notes, 
and scrip of the town and interest thereon and money pay- 
able to the commissioners of the sinking fund and to the 
trustees of the public library ; and also for the payment of 
all accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls which have been 
approved in the manner provided in the previous section. 
Such drafts shall not be negotiated, but shall be transmitted 
by the selectmen directly to the treasurer accompanied by 
the approved bills or other documents for the settlement of 
which the drafts are drawn. 

Sect. 6. The treasurer shall file and safely keep all ap- 
proved and receipted accounts, claims, bills, and pay-rolls, 
and all vouchers, cancelled bonds, notes, scrip, and other 
evidences of indebtedness of the town which have been paid 
from the treasury. 

Sect. 7. Xo draft shall be drawn by the selectmen unless 
there is sufficient appropriation to pay the same, except for 



182 

sums by law payable to the commonwealth or county, final 
judgments of courts, bonds, notes and scrip of the town and 
interest thereon, and money payable to the commissioners 
of the sinking fund. 

Sect. 8. The selectmen and treasurer respectively shall 
make a record, in a book kept for the purpose, of each ap- 
propriation, with a list of the drafts drawn against such 
appropriation, and shall make a record of all bonds, notes, 
scrip or other evidence of indebtedness of the town, signed 
or countersigned by them. 

Sect. 9. When the bills contracted or approved by any 
board, committee, or officer have exhausted the entire ap- 
propriation for such board, committee or officer, they shall 
incur no further expenditure, except in cases where such 
expenditure may be required by law ; and it shall be the 
duty of each board, committee or officer before the close of 
the- financial year to approve all accounts, claims, bills and 
pay-rolls chargeable to their appropriation. During the 
interval between the thirty-first day of January in each 
year and the time of making the next annual appropriations, 
the selectmen, school committee and water commissioners, 
in order to meet the liabilities of their several departments, 
incurred in the carrying on of the work entrusted to them, 
shall have authority to make expenditures and payments 
from the treasury from any available funds therein, and the 
same shall be charged against the next annual appropria- 
tion. Such expenditures and liability incurred for any 
purpose shall not exceed one-fourth the entire amount 
appropriated for that purpose in the previous year. 

Sect. 10. Unless the town shall expressly otherwise vote, 
no extension of water pipes shall be made unless before the 
work of construction is begun one or more of the persons 
whom it is proposed to supply with water by means of such 



183 

extension, shall file with the town clerk a bond with sureties 
satisfactory to the water commissioners, conditioned to pay 
to the town for five years next following the completion of 
such extension and the letting of water into the same, a sum 
sufficient, together with the net annual income from such 
extension, to amount annually to five per centum of the 
total cost thereof. 

ARTICLE III. 

Town Seal. 

Section 1. The design of the town seal shall be : a circle, 
in the border the words "Lincoln. Incorporated in 1746 as 
a precinct; in 1754 as a Town"; in the center, a shield, in 
the chief or upper part of which on a cross, gules, a fleur- 
de-lis, gold, from the old seal of Lincoln, England, and in 
the base of the shield a view of the present town hall; crest, 
the old chestnut tree standing upon the common in Lincoln ; 
in saltire two shepherd's crooks; the device thereof being as 
follows : 

Sect. 2. All deeds and other legal documents made, 
given or entered into by the town requiring a seal shall be 
sealed with the town seal, and signed in behalf of the town 
by a majority of the selectmen. 

Sect. 3. The town clerk shall have the custody of the 
town seal. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Records. 

Section 1. The town clerk shall record in full in a book 
kept for the purpose all written contracts, deeds and other 



184 

instruments to which the town is a party except such instru- 
ments as may by law be recorded in the Registry of Deeds ; 
and it shall be the duty of any board or officer executing or 
receiving such written contract, or other instrument, to 
deliver the same forthwith to the town clerk for the pur- 
pose of record. It shall be the duty of the town clerk to 
see that all conveyances of real estate to the town are prop- 
erly recorded in the Registry of Deeds. 

Sect. 2. The town clerk shall keep a file of all town 
reports, reports of all committees chosen by the town, and 
all original documents relating to the affairs of the town 
which may come into his possession. 



ARTICLE V. 

Books. 

Section 1 . Books, records and laws received by the town 
from the commonwealth shall be deposited in the public 
library building. 

Sect. 2. It shall be the duty of the town officer by whom 
any book mentioned in the preceding section is received, to 
cause the same to be at once deposited in the public library 
building. 

Sect. 3. Such books may be used by the inhabitants of 
the town within such building, and may be taken therefrom 
upon written receipt to the librarian for a period not ex- 
ceeding one day at any one time for use in any town meet- 
ing, or by or before any committee or official of the town. 



185 

ARTICLE VI. 
Suits and Controversies. 

Section 1. The selectmen may compromise claims and 
suits to which the town is a party, provided that they shall 
act upon the advice of counsel when the amount claimed by 
or against the town exceeds $200.00. 

Sect. 2. The selectmen shall have, unless it is otherwise 
voted by the town, full authority as agents of the town to 
institute and prosecute suits or other proceedings in the 
name of the town before any tribunal, to appear and repre- 
sent or defend the town before any tribunal in all suits and 
other proceedings against the town or in which the town 
has an interest, to employ counsel for the purpose aforesaid 
and for other purposes when it may be expedient to do so, 
and to take all necessary and proper measures for the 
protection of the interests and rights of the town. 

Sect. 3. If the town shall, at any meeting called for the 
purpose, choose a committee on claims, such committee shall 
have and exercise exclusively all the powers and duties con- 
ferred upon the selectmen by the two preceding sections. 

ARTICLE VII. 

Reports and Publications by the Town. 

Section 1. The annual reports of the town officers, 
boards and committees shall be prepared in form suitable 
for printing on or before the tenth day of February in each 
year. The selectmen shall cause such reports to be printed 
and distributed to the legal voters of the town seven days 
at least before the annual meeting. 



186 

Sect. 2. The selectmen shall cause to be printed and 
bound each year with the annual reports of the town offi- 
cers, boards and committees, a copy of the records of the 
town meetings during the preceding year; a statement of 
all devises, bequests and donations to the town during the 
preceding year; a list of all laws of the commonwealth 
accepted by the town during the year; all by-laws adopted 
by the town since the preceding annual report ; copies of 
the laying out, alteration, locating anew or discontinuance 
of any highway or townway within the limits of the town 
during the preceding year; and a statement of all outstand- 
ing bonds, notes and obligations of the town for the pay- 
ment of money. 

Sect. 3. The selectmen shall from time to time cause to 
be printed a sufficient number of copies of the by-laws of 
the town and shall incorporate therewith a list of the laws 
of the commonwealth which have been accepted by the 
town. 



ARTICLE VIII. 

Truants. 

Section 1. Any minor being an habitual truant, and any 
child between the ages of seven and fifteen years found 
wandering about the streets or public places within the town 
having no lawful occupation or business, not attending 
school, and growing up in ignorance, and such children as 
persistently violate the reasonable rules and regulations of 
the public schools, may upon conviction thereof be commit- 
ted to the Middlesex County Truant School at Chelmsford, 
Mass., or to any other place provided by the town within 
its limits, for confinement, instruction, and discipline. 



187 

ARTICLE IX. 

Public Regulations. 

Section 1. No person shall coast upon any public street 
or part thereof after the selectmen have posted a notice 
prohibiting coasting upon such street or part thereof. 

Sect. 2. No person, unless authorized by law, shall 
break or dig up any part of any street without a written 
permit therefor from the selectmen. Every person who 
after obtaining such permit shall obstruct or render unsafe 
any public street, shall guard the same by a proper fence or 
railing, and by lights during the night time, subject to the 
approval of the selectmen. Such permit may be revoked at 
any time. 

Sect. 3. Xo person shall be or remain in any doorway, 
or upon any stairs, doorstep, portico or other projection 
from any house or building, or upon or against any wall or 
fence on or near any street or public place, after having been 
requested by the owner or any occupant of the premises or 
by any constable or police officer to remove therefrom. 

Sect. 4. Xo person shall make, write, print, paint, cut or 
post any indecent or obscene marks, words, figures or signs 
upon any fence, building, post, tree or other object exposed 
to public view. 

Sect. 5. Xo person shall wilfully injure, mar, deface or 
destroy any fence, signboard, guideboard, lamp-post, lamp 
or lantern in any street or public place, nor extinguish any 
street light, nor extinguish or remove any light placed to 
denote an obstruction or a defect in any public street or 
way, without proper authority to do so. 



188 

Sect. 6. Any person who shall offend against any of the 
provisions of this article shall forfeit and pay, for each 
offense, a sum not exceeding twenty dollars." 

Which 'said By-Laws being seen and understood by the 
Court, are on this nineteenth day of June, A. D. 1897, 
approved. 

In testimony that the foregoing is a true copy 
of record, I hereto set my hand and affix the seal 
of said Court, this twenty-second day of June, 
A. D. 1897. 

RALPH M. SMITH, Ass't Clerk. 



189 



INDEX 



Page 

Town Officers, 1917 3-5 

Proceedings of Town Meetings, 1917 7-42 

Town Clerk's Report 43-47 

Men from Lincoln in Military Service 48 

Committee on War Efficiency 49-50 

Recommendations for Appropriations 51-52 

Selectmen's Report 51-57 

Auditor's Report 58 

Expenditures for the year 59-74 

Report of Assessors 93-108 

Report of Town Treasurer 81 

Report of the Cemetery Commissioners 116 

Report of Town Treasurer in account Cemetery Com'ssioners 117 

Report of Commissioner of Sinking Fund 82-83 

Report of Treasurer Commissioners Trust Funds . 84-90 

Report of Treasurer Bemis Lecture Fund 91-92 

Report of Water Commissioners 110-116 

Report of Tree Warden 118-119 

Report of Board of Health 109 

Report of Supt. of Streets 78-80 

Report of Inspector of Animals 75-76 

Report of Fire Engineers 77 

Report of Trustees of Lincoln Public Library . . . 120 

Library Statistics 122-123 

Report of Treasurer of Lincoln Library 121 

List of Accessions to Library 124-130 

School Reports 131-174 

School Expenditures 59-61 

Report of School Committee 131-134 

Report of Superintendent of Schools 136-173 

School Calendar 135 

Warrant. 1918 175-178 

By-Laws of the Town 179-188 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



OF THE 



Town of Lincoln 

FOR THE YEAR 1918 

ALSO 

THE REPORTS OF THE 

SCHOOL AND OTHER COMMITTEES 

FOR THE YEAR 1918 




BOSTON : 

DANIELS PRINTING COMPANY, PRINTERS 

77-79 WASHINGTON STREET NORTH 

1010 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 

OF THE 

Town of Lincoln 

FOR THE YEAR 1918 

ALSO 

THE REPORTS OF THE 

SCHOOL AND OTHER COMMITTEES 

FOR THE YEAR 1918 




BOSTON : 

DANIELS PRINTING COMPANY, PRINTERS 

77-79 WASHINGTON STREET NORTH 

1919 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1918-1919 



Town Clerk. 

♦ARTHUR F. CHAPIN 
tWILLIAM C PEIRCE 



Selectmen and Overseers of the Poor. 

CHARLES S. SMITH Term expires 1921 

ROBERT D. DONALDSON " "1920 

JOHN F. FARRAR " " 1919 



Boafd of Health. 

CHARLES E. CLARK Term expires 1921 

MARTIN M. WELCH " " 1919 

R. D. DONALDSON " " 1920 



Assessors. 

WILLIAM C PEIRCE Term expires 1919 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN " "1920 

CHARLES S. WHEELER " 192 1 



Treasurer 
C. LEE TODD. 

Collector of Taxes. 
THOMAS L. GILES. 



Resigned Sept. 14. 

Sworn Sept. 24. Appointed by the Selectment. 



Auditor. 
JAMES W. LENNON. 

Constables. 
JOHN J. KELLIHER. GEORGE E. CUNNINGHAM. 



Commissioners of Trust Funds. 

CHARLES S. SMITH Term expires 1921 

C LEE TODD " " 1919 

UULIUS E. EVELETH " " 1920 



Tree Warden. j 

JOHN J. KELLIHER. 

Trustees for Bemis Fund for Free Public Lectures. 

EDWARD F. FLINT Term expires 1921 

UULIUS E. EVELETH " " 1920 

C. LEE TODD " " 1919 

TrHistdcs of Grammar School Fund. 

CHARLES S. WHEELER. JGEORGE L. CHAPIN. 

tJULIUS E. EVELETH. 



Trustees of Lincoln Library. 

GEORGE G. TARBELL. JOHN F. FARRAR. 

CHARLES LEE TODD. 
CHARLES S. SMITH, Chairman, of Selectmen, ex-officio. 
ANTHONY J. DOHERTY, Chairman School Committee, ex-officio. 



^Deceased. 



5 

Registrars. 

CHARLES S. SMITH. ROBERT D. DONALDSON. 

JOHN F. FARRAR. WILLIAM C. PEIRCE. 

School Committee. 

ANTHONY J. DOHERTY Term expires 1919 

AMOS R. LITTLE " " 1920 

CONRAD P. HATHEWAY " " 1921 



Water Co m m issio >iv rs. 

JOSEPH S. HART Term expires 1919 

SUMNER SMITH " " 1920 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN " "1921 



Field Drivers. 
SUMNER SMITH. MATTHEW H. DOHERTY. 

Fence Viewers. 
JOHN F. FARRAR. WILLIAM H. SHERMAX. 

Surveyors of Lumber. 
SAMUEL FARRAR. 

Measurers of Wood and Bark. 
SAMUEL FARRAR. JOHN F. FARRAR. 



Cemetery Commissioners. 

CHARLES S. SMITH Term expires 1921 

tJULIUS E. EVELETH " " 1919 

FRITZ CUMMERT " " 1920 

^Deceased. 



TOWN CLERKS REPORT 



Proceedings of a Town Meeting held March 4, 1918 

WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln in said 
County : 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you 
are hereby required to notify the legal voters of said Town of 
Lincoln, qualified to vote at Town Meeting for the transaction 
of Town affairs, to meet in the Town Hall, in said Lincoln on 
Monday, the fourth day of March next at 11.30 o'clock A. M., 
by posting a copy of this Warrant, by you attested, in each of 
the Post Offices and in some other public place in said Town, 
seven days at least before the fourth day of March, then and 
there to act on the following Articles : 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot will be open at 
12 o'clock noon and may be closed at 6.30 o'clock P. M. 

ARTICLE 1. To choose a Moderator. 

ART. 2. To bring in their votes for the following Town 
Officers, and any other officers required by law to be elected 
by ballot or otherwise, also any committees, commissioners and 
trustees. 



One Town Clerk for one year. 

Three Selectmen, one for three years, one for two years, one 
for one year. 

One member of the Board of Assessors, for three years. 

One member of the Board of Health, for three years. 

One Treasurer, for one year. 

One Collector, for one year. 

One Auditor,for one year. 

Two Constables, for one year. 

One Tree Warden, for one year. 

One member of the Trust Fund Commissioners, for three 
years. 

One member of Trustees for Free Public Lectures, for 
three years. 

One member of the School Committee, for three years. 

One member of the Board of Water Commissioners, for 
three years. 

One member of the Board of Cemetery Commissioners, for 
three years. 

Also to vote "Yes" or "No" upon the following question: 
"Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors 
in this Town?" 

ART. 3. To hear and act upon the report of Town Officers, 
Committees, Commissioners, and Trustees. 

ART. 4. To appropriate money for necessary and expedient 
purposes of the Town and enact anything in relation to the 
same. 



ART. 5. To determine the manner of collecting taxes for 
the ensuing year. 

ART. 6. To determine the compensation of the Collector 
of Taxes for the ensuing year. 

ART. 7. To see if the Town will authorize the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow during the 
municipal year, beginning February 1, 1918, in anticipation 
of the collection of taxes for the said year, such sums of 
money as may be necessary for the current expenses of the 
Town, but not exceeding the total tax levy for the said year, 
giving the notes of the Town in payment therefore, payable 
in one year from the date thereof, all debts incurred under 
authority of this vote shall be paid from taxes of the present 
municipal year. 

ART. 8. To see if the Town will choose a Committee on 
Claims under the provisions of Section 3, Article 6, of the 
By-Laws. 

ART. 9. To see if the Town will take steps to discontinue 
the light on certain streets. 

ART. 10. To see what action the Town will take with re- 
lation to the old school house in the center of the Town. 



HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

And make due return of this Warrant with your doings 
thereon to the Town Clerk at or before the time for the meet- 
ing aforesaid. 



10 

Given under our hands this nineteenth day of February, in 
the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and eighteen. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



11 

The following return is on the back of the Warrant : 

I have served this Warrant by posting an attested copy in 
each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad Station seven 
days before date of said meeting. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Constable of Lincoln. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant, the meeting was called 
to order by the Town Clerk and the Warrant read. 

ARTICLE 1. Voted to choose Sumner Smith, Moderator 
of this meeting. (Sworn.) 

Moderator then appointed the following : Walter W. John- 
son (Sworn) ; Francis B. Sargent (Tellers) ; Thomas J. Dee, 
Charles E. Clark, Ballot Clerks, (Sworn). 

The polls were opened at 12 o'clock noon. Voted: That 
when this meeting adjourn, it do so to meet again in Bemis 
Hall, Saturday next at 1 o'clock P. M. 

Voted to adjourn at 6.45 P. M. 

ART. 2. The result of the Ballot was as follows : 

Town Clerk. — 

Arthur F. Chapin, sworn, 119 votes. 
Thomas L. Giles, 9 " 

Scattering, 3 " 

Blanks, 60 



12 



Selectman, for three years.- 

Charles S. Smith, sworn, 
Blanks 



178 votes. 
3 " 



Selectman, for two years. — 

Anthony J. Doherty, 

Robert D. Donaldson, sworn, 

Blanks, 



49 votes. 
127 " 

15 " 



Selectman, for one year. — 

John F. Farrar, sworn, 
Blanks, 



160 votes. 
31 " 



Assessor, for three years. — 

Charles S. Wheeler, sworn, 

Scattering, 

Blanks, 



124 votes. 

8 " 

59 " 



Treasurer. — 

Roderick B. Laird, 
C. Lee Todd, sworn, 
Scattering, 
Blanks, 



90 votes. 
97 " 

2 " 

2 " 



Collector of Taxes. — 

Thomas L. Giles, sworn, 
Roderick B. Laird, 
Blanks, 



92 votes. 

91 " 

8 " 



13 



Auditor. — 

James W. Lennon, sworn, 
Blanks 



167 votes. 

24 " 



Constables. — 

I ieorge E. Cunningham, sworn, 
John J. Kelliher. sworn, 



164 votes. 
164 " 



School Committee, for three years. — 

Elizabeth \V. Blodgett, 82 votes. 

Conrad P. Hatheway, sworn. Ill " 

Blank. 10 " 



Water Commissioner, for three years. — 

William H. Sherman, sworn. 136 votes. 
Scattering, 4 " 

Blank. 51 



Board of Health, for three years. 

Martin M. Welch. 
Charles E. Clark. 
Scattering. 
Blank. 



105 votes. 
37 " 
1 " 
48 " 



Tree Warden. — 

John J. Kelliher, sworn, 
Blank, 



164 votes. 

27 " 



14 

Cemetery Commissioner, for three years. — 

Charles S. Smith, sworn, 157 votes. 

Scattering, 7 " 

Blanks, 33 " 



Commissioner of Trust Funds, for three years. — 

Charles S. Smith, 118 votes. 

Scattering, 5 " 

Blanks, 68 " 



Trustee for Bemis Fund for Free Public Lectures, 
for three years. — 

Edward F. Flint, 162 votes. 

Blank, 29 " 

Question. — 

Shall License be granted for the sale of Intoxicating Liquors 
in the Town: 



Yes, 


19 votes. 


No, 


137 " 


Blank, 


35 " 


Regular Ballots, 


191 votes. 


Special School Committee Ballots, 


12 " 


Total Vote, 


203 " 



Meeting was called to order on the following Saturday 
at 1 o'clock P. M. by the Moderator, who read the result of 
the ballot. 



15 

The following officers were then chosen : 

Field Drivers. — 

Sumner Smith. 
Matthew H. Doherty. 

Fence Viewers. — 

John F. Farrar. 

William H. Sherman, sworn. 

Surveyor of Lumber. 

Samuel Farrar. 

Measurers of Wood and Bark. — 

« 

Samuel Farrar. 
John F. Farrar. 

ART. 3. Voted that all the reports of Town Officers ap- 
pearing in the printed Town Report be accepted. 

ART. 4. Voted and appropriated: 

For Schools $11,500.00 

Transportation of Children 4,500.00 

Support of Poor 500.00 

Highways and Bridges 11,000.00 

Library, the Dog Tax and 500.00 

Interest 500.00 

Cemeteries (from Cemetery Fund) 500.00 



16 

Board of Health $200.00 

Tree Warden 500.00 

Suppression of Gypsy and Brown Tail Moth. . . . 2,000.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses 5,000.00 

Hydrant and other Water Service 2,400.00 

Waltham Hospital, Free Bed 250.00 

Street Lamps 1,600.00 

Fire Department 200.00 

Payment of Schoolhouse Bonds 3,000.00 

Interest of Schoolhouse Bonds 840.00 

Payment of Water Bonds (from Water Works 

Income) 1,000.00 

Water Works Sinking Fund (from Water Works 

Income) 1,500.00 

Voted, That the sums already voted, $1,000, be taken from 
the Cemetery Fund, and $5,000 be taken from money now in 
the Treasury. 

ART. 5. Voted that the taxes be collected in the same 
way and manner as last year. 

ART. 6. Voted, That the Collector be paid the same 
rate of compensation as last year. 

ART. 7. Voted, That the Town authorize the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow during the 
municipal year beginning February 1, 1918, in anticipation of 
taxes for said year such sums of money as may be necessary 
for the current expenses of the Town, but not exceeding the 



17 



total tax levy for the said year, giving the notes of the Town 
in payment thereof, all debts incurred under authority of this 
vote shall be paid from taxes of the present municipal year. 



ART. 8. Voted, That this article lie on the table. 



ART. 9. Voted, That this matter be referred to the Select- 
men, with power to act. 

ART. 10. Voted, unanimously, That the Selectmen be au- 
thorized and directed to dispose of the old schoolhouse in the 
center of the town to the highest bidder at public auction on 
or before July 1, 1918. 

Voted, That this meeting do now dissolve. 

Attest : 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerks 

Lincoln, March 9, 1918. 

To the Town Clerk: — 

I hereby resign from my recent election for three years 
on the Board of Health. 

MARTIN M. WELCH. 
Attest : 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



18 

Lincoln, July 27, 1918. 

Isaac Langill was this day sworn Special Police for the 
remainder of the year by 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



Lincoln, September 6, 1918. 

Lorenzo E. Brooks was this day sworn Special Police for 
the remainder of the year by 

ARTHUR F. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



September 14, 1918. 

Arthur F. Chapin has this day resigned his office as Town 
Clerk. 



September 24, 1918. 
William C. Peirce was this day sworn as Town Clerk. 



19 



Proceedings of the State Primary, held September 

24, 1918 

WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required 
to notify and warn the inhabitants of said Town who are 
qualified to vote in Primaries to meet in Town Hall, Tues- 
day, the twenty-fourth day of September, 1918, at 3 o'clock 
P. M., for the following purposes : 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the 
Nomination of Candidates of Political Parties for the fol- 
lowing offices : 

Governor for this Commonwealth. 

Lieutenant Governor for this Commonwealth. 

Secretary of the Commonwealth for this Commonwealth. 

Treasurer and Receiver General for this Commonwealth. 

Auditor of the Commonwealth for this Commonwealth. 

Attorney-General for this Commonwealth. 



20 

U. S. Senators in Congress for this Commonwealth. 

Congressmen for 5th Congressional District. 

Councillor for 6th Councillor District. 

Senator for 5th Senatorial District. 

Representative in General Court for 13th Representative 
District. 

County Commissioner for Middlesex County. 

County Treasurer for Middlesex County. 

Register of Probate and Insolvency for Middlesex County. 

And for the Election of the following officers : 

District Member of State Committee for each Political 
Party. 

For the 5th Senatorial District. 

Five members of the Democratic Town Committee. 

Five members of the Republican Town Committee. 

Members of Socialist Town Committee. 

Delegates to the State Convention of the Democratic party. 

Delegates to the State Convention of the Republican party. 

Delegates to the State Convention of the Socialist party. 



21 

All the above candidates and officers to be voted for upon 
one Ballot. The Polls will be open from 3 P. M. to 8 P. M., 
and you are directed to serve this warrant by posting attested 
copies thereof seven days at least before the time of said meet- 
ing as directed by vote of the Town. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT, 

and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at 
the time and place of said meeting. Given under our hands 
this twelfth day of September, A. D., 1918. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

The following return was found on the back of the War- 
rant : 

I have served this Warrant by posting an attested copy in 
each of the Post Offices, and one in the Railroad Station 
seven days before the date of said meeting. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Constable of Lincoln. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant the meeting was called to 
order by John F. Farrar, Acting Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen, who read the Warrant and administered the oath to 
Thomas J. Dee, and James W. Lennon as Tellers, and to 
Thomas L. Giles as Ballot Clerk. The polls were opened at 
3 o'clock P. M. and were closed at 8 o'clock P. M. A total 



22 



of 43 votes was cast and this total agreed with the check list 
of the Tellers. After the counting of Ballots they were sealed 
and the result of the ballot read in open meeting. It was 
voted that the meeting do then dissolve. 



The result of the Ballot was as follows 
FOR GOVERNOR.— 

Calvin Coolidge, of Northampton (R.), 
William A. Gaston of Boston (D.), 
Blanks 

FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR.— 
Channing H. Cox of Boston (R.), 
Guy Andrews Ham of Milton (R.), 
Joseph H. O'Neil (D.), 
Blanks, 

FOR SECRETARY.— 

Albert P. Langtry of Springfield (R.), 

Charles H. McGlue (D.), 

Blanks, 

FOR TREASURER.— 

Charles L. Burrill of Boston (R.), 
Frank W. Thayer (R.), 
Charles Giddings (D.), 
Blanks, 

FOR AUDITOR.— 

Alonzo B. Cook of Boston (R.), 
Alonzo P. Grinnell of Lynn (R.), 
Francis M. Costello (D.), 
Blanks. 



36 


votes. 


6 


(< 


1 


(< 


27 


votes. 


10 


(< 


1 


. <( 


5 


a 


36 


votes. 


1 


t* 


6 


" 


32 


votes. 


3 


tt 


1 


(t 


9 


n 


29 


votes. 


6 


«< 


1 


t* 


7 


tt 



23 



FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL.— 

J. Watson Allen of Newton (R.) 
Henry C. Attwill of Lynn (R.), 
Joseph L. P. St. Coeur (D.), 
Blanks, 

FOR SENATOR IN CONGRESS.— 

John W. Weeks of Newton (R.), 
David I. Walsh of Fitchburg (D.), 
Blanks, 

FOR CONGRESSMAN FIFTH DISTRICT.— 

John Jacob Rogers of Lowell (R.) 
Blanks, 

FOR COUNCILLOR, SIXTH DISTRICT.— 

James G. Harris of Medford (R.)» 
Blanks, 



15 


votes. 


20 


" 


1 


It 


7 


« 


35 


votes. 


4 


<« 


4 


<< 


36 


votes. 


7 


ii 


35 votes. 


8 


« 



FOR SENATOR FIFTH MIDDLESEX DISTRICT.— 
Charles S. Smith of Lincoln (R.)> 33 votes. 



Blanks, 



10 



FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 
THIRTEENTH MIDDLESEX DISTRICT.— 



Benjamin Loring Young of Weston (R.) ; 
Blanks, 



36 votes. 

7 " 



FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, MIDDLESEX.— 



Alfred L. Cutting of Weston (R.), 
Blanks, 



37 votes. 
6 " 



24 



FOR COUNTY TREASURER, MIDDLESEX.— 

Charles Bruce of Everett (R.), 8 votes. 

Joseph O. Hayden of Somerville (R.)> 27 " 
Blanks, 9 

FOR REGISTER OF PROBATE AND 
INSOLVENCY, MIDDLESEX COUNTY.— 

William G. Andrews of Cambridge (R.)> 9 votes. 

Frederick M. Esty of Framingham (R.), 25 " 

Blanks, 9 " 



STATE COMMITTEE, FIFTH 
MIDDLESEX DISTRICT.— 

John F. Mitchell of Marlborough (D.), 
Blanks, 

DELEGATE TO STATE CONVENTION.— 

John F. Farrar (R.)> 
Charles S. Smith (R.), 
Robert D. Donaldson (R.), 
Martin M, Welch (D.), 

TOWN COMMITTEE.— 

Charles S. Smith (R.), 
John F. Farrar (R.), 
Robert D. Donaldson (R.), 
Scattering, 



3 


votes 


40 


u 


17 


votes. 


4 


u 


1 


a 


1 


(( 


15 


votes. 


14 


u 


11 


" 


19 


« 



FOR STATE COMMITTEE. 

John F. Farrar (R.)> 
Adelbert Messer (D.), 



7 votes. 



25 

Robert D. Donaldson (R.), 1 vote. 

Sumner Smith (R.), 1 " 

Attest : 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 

Town Clerk. 



October 21, 1918. 

Winslow Eaton was this day sworn as Special Police for 
the remainder of the year. 



27 



Proceedings of the State Election, held November 

5, 1918 

WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To any Constable in the Town of Lincoln in said County. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you 
are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of the 
Town of Lincoln duly qualified to vote in the election of State 
and County Officers to assemble at Bemis Hall on Tuesday, 
November 5, at 7 o'clock in the forenoon to give in their votes 
for the following officers, viz. : Governor, Lieutenant Gover- 
nor, Secretary, Treasurer, Auditor, Attorney-General, Coun- 
cillor, Senator, Representative in the General Court, County 
Commissioner, Register of Probate and Insolvency, and any 
other officers required by law to be chosen in the month of 
November of the current year. All officers enumerated above 
are to be designated and voted for on one ballot. The polls 
to be opened at 7 o'clock A. M. and may be closed at 4 o'clock 
P. M. 

Also to vote on the various amendments to the Constitution. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting an 
attested copy thereof in each of the Post Offices and one 



28 

other public place seven days at least before the day appointed 
for said meeting and make seasonable return thereof with 
your doings thereon to the Town Clerk. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

Dated at Lincoln this twenty-eighth day of October A. D. 
nineteen hundred and eighteen. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

The return on the Warrant is as follows : 

Lincoln, October 30, 1918. 

I have served this Warrant by posting an attested copy in 
each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad Station seven 
days before date of said meeting. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Constable of Lincoln. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant the meeting was called to 
order by the Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, who read 
the Warrant and administered the oath to Thomas L. Giles 
and Thomas J. Dee as Tellers, and to Charles E. Clark and 
James W. Lennon as Ballot Clerks. The polls were opened 
at 7 o'clock A. M. and remained open until 6.30 o'clock P. M. 
A total of 181 votes was cast and the total agreed with the 
counter on the Ballot Box and with the check list used by the 
Tellers. After counting, the Ballots were given to the Town 
Clerk and sealed. The result of the Ballot was read in open 
meeting, after which it was voted to dissolve the meeting. 



29 



The result of the Ballot was as follows 



FOR GOVERNOR.— 

Calvin Coolidge of Northampton (R.), 
Richard H. Long of Framingham (D.), 
Ingvar Paulsen of Boston (S. L.), 
Blanks, 

FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR.— 
Channing H. Cox of Boston (R.), 
Oscar Kinsalas of Springfield (S. L.), 
Joseph H. O'Neil of Boston (D.), 
Blank, 

FOR SECRETARY.— 

Albert P. Langtry of Springfield (R.), 
Charles H. McGlue of Lynn (D.), 
William Taylor of Worcester (S. L.), 
Blank, 

FOR TREASURER.— 

Charles L. Burrill of Boston (R.), 
Charles Giddings of Great Barrington (D.), 
Mary E. Peterson of Somerville (S. L.), 
Blank, 

FOR AUDITOR.— 

Alonzo B. Cook of Boston (R.), 
Francis M. Costello of Boston (D.), 
Fred E. Delcher of Peabody (S. L.), 
Blank, 

FOR ATTORNEY-GENERAL.— 
Henry C. Attwill of Lynn (R.), 
Morris I. Becker of Chelsea (S. L.), 
Joseph L. P. St. Coeur of Boston (D.), 
Blank, 



114 


votes. 


63 


a 


1 


a 


3 


tt 


115 


votes. 


3 


tt 


59 


<« 


4 


«< 


122 


votes, 


48 


«« 


1 


tt 


10 


a 


119 


votes, 


48 


«< 


3 


tt 


11 


(t 


117 


votes, 


58 


tt 


2 


<< 


14 


<< 


126 


votes 


3 


<« 


41 


<( 


11 


tt 



7 


votes 


63 


«« 


110 


<« 


1 


<< 


131 


votes, 


50 


«« 


126 


votes. 


55 


(t 


148 


votes. 


33 


«< 



30 



FOR SENATOR IN CONGRESS.— 
Thomas W. Lawson of Scituate (I.), 
David L Walsh of Fitchburg (D.), 
John W. Weeks of Newton (R.), 
Blank, 

FOR CONGRESSMAN, (Fifth District).— 
John Jacob Rogers of Lowell (R.), 
Blank, 

FOR COUNCILLOR, (Sixth District).— 

James G. Harris of Medford (R.)» 
Blank, 

FOR SENATOR, (Fifth Middlesex District). «- 
Charles S. Smith of Lincoln (R.), 
Blank, 



FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 
(Thirteen Middlesex District). — 

Benjamin Loring Young of Weston (R.), 131 votes. 

Blank, 50 " 

FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, (Middlesex County).— 

Alfred L. Cutting of Weston (R.), 124 votes. 

John F. Farrar of Lincoln (R.), 1 " 

Blank, 56 " 

FOR COUNTY TREASURER.— 

Joseph O. Hayden of Somerville (R.), 123 votes. 

Blank, 58 " 

FOR REGISTER OF PROBATE AND INSOLVENCY, 

(Middlesex County). — 

Frederick M. Esty of Framingham (R.), 124 votes. 

Blank, 57 " 



31 

Amendment No. 1. — 

Shall the Article of Amendment relative to the establish- 
ment of the popular initiative and referendum and the legis- 
lative initiative of specific amendments of the Constitution, 
submitted by the Constitutional Convention, be approved and 
ratified? 

Yes, 38 votes. 

No, 105 " 

Blank, 28 " 

Amendment No. 2. — 

Shall the following Article of Amendment Relative to the 
Public Interest in Natural Resources, submitted by the Con- 
stitutional Convention, be approved and ratified? 

Yes, 42 votes. 

No, 75 " 

Blank, 64 " 

Amendment No. 3. — 

Shall the following Article of Amendment to Provide for 
the Regulation of Advertising in Public Places, submitted by 
the Constitutional Convention, be approved and ratified? 

Yes, 62 votes. 

No, 48 " 

Blank, 71 " 

Amendment No. 4. — 

Shall the following Article of Amendment relative to the 
Preservation and Maintenance of Property of Historical and 
Antiquarian Interest, submitted by the Constitutional Con- 
vention, be approved and ratified? 

Yes, 60 votes. 

No, . 55 " 

Blank, 76 " 



32 



Amendment No. 5. — 



Shall the following Article of Amendment relative to Ad- 
journments of the General Court, submitted by the Constitu- 
tional Convention, be approved and ratified? 

Yes, 36 votes. 

No, 60 " 

Blank, 85 " 



Amendment No. 6. — 

Shall the Article of Amendment authorizing the General 
Court to prescribe, subject to certain restrictions, the manner 
of the appointment and removal of military and naval officers 
to be commissioned by the Governor, submitted by the Con- 
stitutional Convention, be approved and ratified? 

Yes, 37 votes. 

No, 61 " 

Blank, 83 " 



Amendment No. 7. — 

Shall the Article of Amendment defining the powers and 
duties of the General Court relative to the military and naval 
forces, and of the Governor as Commander-in-Chief thereof, 
be approved and ratified? 

Yes, 40 votes. 

No, 56 " 

Blank, 85 " 



Amendment No. 8. — 

Shall the Article of Amendment providing for the succes- 
sion, in cases of vacancies in the offices of Governor and Lieu- 
tenant Governor, by the secretary, attorney-general, treasurer 



33 

and receiver general, and auditor, in the order named, be ap- 
proved and ratified? 

Yes, 49 votes. 

No, 53 " 

Blank, 79 " 

Amendment No. 9. — 

Shall the Article of Amendment authorizing the Governor 
to return to the General Court with a recommendation for 
amendment bills and resolves which have been laid before him, 
be approved and ratified? 

Yes, 50 votes. 

No, 49 " 

Blank, 82 " 

Amendment No. 10. — 

Shall the following Article of Amendment providing that 
Women shall be Eligible to Appointment as Notaries Public, 
submitted by the Constitutional Convention, be approved and 
ratified? 

Yes, 48 votes. 

No, 55 " 

Blank, 78 " 

Amendment No. 11. — 

Shall the following Article of Amendment relative to the 
Retirement of Judicial Officers, submitted by the Constitutional 
Convention, be approved and ratified? 

Yes, 45 votes. 

No, 51 " 

Blank, 85 " 

Amendment No. 12. — 

Shall the following Article of Amendment relative to the 
Revocation or Alteration of Grants, Franchises, Privileges or 



34 

Immunities, submitted by the Constitutional Convention, be 
approved and ratified ? 

Yes, - 40 votes. 

No, 55 " 

Blank, 85 " 

Amendment No. 13. — 

Shall the following Article of Amendment relative to the 
Power of the General Court to Limit Buildings according to 
their Use or Construction to Specified Districts of Cities and 
Towns, submitted by the Constitutional Convention, be ap- 
proved and ratified? 

Yes, 37 votes. 

No, 59 " 

Blank, 85 " 

Amendment No. 14. — 

Shall the following Article of Amendment relative to Com- 
pulsory Voting at Elections, submitted by the Constitutional 
Convention, be approved and ratified? 

Yes, 31 votes. 

No, 74 " 

Blank, 76 " 

Amendment No. 15. — 

Shall the amendment of the Constitution limiting the power 
of the General Court to lend the credit of the Commonwealth 
and to contract loans, be approved and ratified? 

Yes, 40 votes. 

No, 60 " 

Blank, 81 " 

Amendment No. 16. — 

Shall the amendment to the Constitution providing for a 



35 

state budget and the veto by the Governor of items or parts of 
items in appropriation bills be approved and ratified? 

Yes, 49 votes. 

No, . 49 " 

Blank, 83 " 

Amendment No. 17. — 

Shall the amendment of the Constitution providing for bien- 
nial elections of state officers, councillors and members of 
the General Court, be approved and ratified? 

Yes, 44 votes. 

No, 60 " 

Blank, 77 " 

Amendment No. 18. — 

Shall the following Article of Amendment relative to Ser- 
vice on Certain Legislative Recess Committees and Commis- 
sions, submitted by the Constitution Convention, be approved 
and ratified? 

Yes, 45 votes. 

No, 51 " 

Blank, 85 " 

Amendment No. 19. — 

Shall the following Article of Amendment to provide for 
the more efficient administration of the business of the Com- 
monwealth, submitted by the Constitutional Convention, be 
approved and ratified? 

Yes, 42 votes. 

No, 55 " 

Blank, 84 " 

Attest : 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 

Town Clerk. 



36 



At a meeting of the Town Clerks of the Thirteenth Rep- 
resentative District of Middlesex County, held at Concord, 
November 15, 1918, the vote for Representative in the Gen- 
eral Court was determined as follows : 



Benjamin Loring Young of Weston. .. .554 131 132 248 278 1343 

George Albree of Concord 1 1 

Andrew Fisk of Weston 1 1 

Blank, 237 50 38 116 26 467 

Totals 792 181 170 365 304 1812 

Two certificates of the election of Benjamin Loring Young 
of Weston were prepared and signed by the Clerks for trans- 
mission to the Secretary of the Commonwealth and to the Rep- 
resentative-elect. 

William D. Cross, Town Clerk of Concord. 
William C. Peirce, Town Clerk of Lincoln. 
Frank T. Gerry, Town Clerk of Sudbury. 
Warren L. Bishop, Town Clerk of Wayland. 
Brenton H. Dickson, Jr., Town Clerk of Weston. 



Attest : 



WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 

Town Clerk. 



37 



JURY LIST FOR 1918 
As prepared by the Selectmen of Lincoln 



Xanie 

Adams, John 
Bamforth, Fred J. D. 
Brooks, Lorenzo E. 
Calkins, T. Alonzo 
Clark, Charles E. 
Corrigan, Patrick F. 
Crook, Russel G. 
Farnsworth, Charles P. 
Farrar, Herbert W. 
Farrar, John F. 
Flint, Ephraim B. 
Gordon, Donald 
Foreman, Charles F. 
Harding, William A. 
Johnson, Walter W. 
Laird, Ludwig V. A. 
Lennon, James W. 
Martin, Owen E. 
McAskill, Dan A. 
McHugh, John E. 
Nelson, John W. 
Neville, James M. 
Welch, Martin M. 
Wheeler, Abner S. 



P. 0. Address 


Occupation 


So. Lincoln 




Business Man 


Lincoln 




Farmer 


Concord, R. F. 


D. 


Farmer 


So. Lincoln 




Farmer 


Lincoln 




Carpenter 


So. Lincoln 




Clerk 


So. Lincoln 




Sculptor 


So. Lincoln 




Farmer 


So. Lincoln 




Farmer 


So. Lincoln 




Farmer 


Lincoln 




Farmer 


So. Lincoln 




Lawyer 


So. Lincoln 




Carpenter 


So. Lincoln 




Carpenter 


Lincoln 




Farmer 


Lincoln 




Clerk 


So. Lincoln 




Clerk 


So. Lincoln 




Farmer 


So. Lincoln 




Blacksmith 


Concord, R. F. 


D. 


Farmer 


Lexington, R. F 


. D. 


Farmer 


Concord, R. F. 


D. 


Farmer 


So. Lincoln 




Farmer 


So. Lincoln 




Clerk 


CHARLES S 


. SMITH 


JOHN F. 


FARRAR 


ROBERT D. 


DONALDSON 






Selectmen of Lincoln. 



38 



There have been recorded during the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1918, 7 Marriages, 19 Births, 20 Deaths. 

Births Registered 



Date 


of 


Birth 


Name of Child 


Name of Parents 


Dec. 


2, 


1917 


Stillborn Mason 


Perley James and Fannie Etta Moore 


Jan. 


1, 


1918 


Rocco Ciraso 


Michael and Amelia Marganella 


Mar. 


1, 


1918 


Philip Cahill Corrigan 


Patrick F. and Margaret M. Cahill 


April 


1, 


1918 


Emengarde de Vermandois 
Bosley 


Frederick A. and Emily S. Sawyer 


April 


4, 


1918 


Alfred Krumen 


Russel and Jennie Bosdar 


April 


23, 


1918 


Henry James Davis 


William Henry and Alice May 
MacPhee 


April 


24, 


1918 


Joseph Floyd Hayes 


John J. and Delia Halley 


May 


14, 


1918 


Rachel Stimpson 


Cleveland A. and Mabel E. Smith 


May 


27, 


1918 


Paul Edward Parker 


(Not given) Grace May Parker 


May 


27, 


1918 


Jane Patricia Lennon 


James W. and Frances M. Carey 


June 


15, 


1918 


Congettina Campobasso 


Jiose and Annina Dimeo 


June 


24, 


1918 


Tohn Catoni 


Nicholas and Caroline Monica 


July 


1, 


1918 


Mary Elizabeth Heald 


lay Morrill and Ethel Leroy Elliot 


July 


8, 


1918 


Swar Joseph Hallburg 


Swar and Eva Estell Welding 


Oct. 


1, 


1918 


Mary Julia Neville 


James Martin and Mary Agnes Molloy 


Oct. 


20, 


1918 


Ada Elizabeth Nelson 


Charles M. and Ada Elizabeth Peterson 


Oct. 


24, 


1918 


Tames Henry Doherty 


Matthew H. and Elizabeth C. Hunter 


Oct. 


30, 


1918 


Edna Frances Mann 


David and Iva S. Cleland 


Nov. 


2, 


1918 


John Bernard Lennon, Jr. 


John B. and Elizabeth MacDonald 



EXTRACT FROM THE REVISED LAWS Chap. 29 
AS AMENDED BY CHAP. 280, ACTS OF 1912 

Sect. 1. Physicians and midwives shall, within forty- 
eight hours after the birth of every child in cases of which 
they were in charge, mail or deliver to the clerk or registrar of 
the city or town in which the birth occurred a notice stating 
the date and place of the birth, giving the street number, if 
any, the number of the ward in a city and the family name. 
Failure to mail or deliver the said notice shall be punished by 
a fine not exceeding twenty-five dollars for each offence. The 
notice required by this Section need not be given if the notice 
required by the following Section is given within forty-eight 
hours after the birth occurs. 

Sect. 6. Parents, within forty days after the birth of a 
child, and every householder, within forty days after the birth 
of a child in his house, shall cause notice thereof to be given 
to the clerk of the City or Town, in which such child is born. 

Sect. 8. A parent, keeper, superintendent or other person 
who is required by Section 6 to give or cause to be given 
notice of a birth or death, who neglects so to do for ten days 
after the time limited therefor, shall forfeit not more than five 
dollars for such offence. 



39 



Marriages Registered 



Date o 


f Marriag 


e 


Marriages Registered 


Residence 


July 


15, 


1918 


{ 


Herbert Francis Higgins 
Audry Frances Brennan 


West Roxbury 
Lincoln 


July 


20, 


1918 


I 


Warren Adlington Sherman 
Marguerite Elizabeth Nutting 


Lincoln 
Waltham 


July 


29, 


1918 


{ 


Harry Russ 

Laura Addie Garlick 


Lincoln 
Dorchester 


Aug. 


21, 


1918 


{ 


Percy Chandler Chipman 
Beatrice Lillian Davis 


Portland, Me. 
Lincoln 


Aug. 


28, 


1918 


{ 


John Moran Cochran Wilson 
Ida Bigelow Eldredge 


Spring Hill, N. S. 
Lincoln 


Oct. 


5, 


1918 


{ 


Warren Augustus Rice 
Ruth Hulda Davis 


Lincoln 
Waltham 


Nov. 


18, 


1918 


{ 


Phillips Bradley 
Rebecca Pickering 


Lincoln 
Salem, Mass. 



40 



Deaths Registered 













Age 




Date 


of 


Death 


Name 








Y. 


M. 


D. 


Dec. 


2, 


1917 


Stillborn Mason 











Jan. 


12, 


1918 


Alice Killegrew Dee 


66 


— 


— 


Feb. 


9, 


1918 


Augusta Plumer Russ 


78 


3 


6 


Mar. 


7, 


1918 


Abigail Prescott (Baker) Smith 


94 


5 


24 


Mar. 


13, 


1918 


N. John Haines, Jr. 


69 


10 


1 


April 


2, 


1918 


Ermengarde de Vermandois Bosley 






1 


Mar. 


11, 


1918 


Mary E. White 


46 


4 


29 


April 


6, 


1918 


Celia M. Doherty 


35 


9 


6 


May 


27, 


1918 


George Loring Chapin 


58 


4 


15 


June 


21, 


1918 


Samuel Francis Page 


61 


4 


10 


June 


22, 


1918 


Abijah G. Jones 


89 


8 


9 


Aug. 


13, 


1918 


Lulu Cook 


4 


— 


29 


Aug. 


15, 


1918 


Mary Boyce 


65 


7 


15 


Sept. 


15, 


1918 


Mary E. Curry 


49 


6 


15 


Sept. 


17, 


1918 


Martin Hays 


55 


— 


2 


Oct. 


17, 


1918 


George Minot Baker 


92 


5 


23 


Nov. 


15, 


1918 


John Francis Neville 


42 


8 


23 


Dec. 


12, 


1918 


Ann Bannon 


63 


11 


12 


Dec. 


20, 


1918 


Frederick B. Pearson 


9 


2 


6 


Dec. 


22, 


1918 


Julius E. Eveleth 


78 


5 


19 



41 



Loyal to Home and Country 
Trusting in God 

MEN OF LINCOLN 
WHO HAVE GONE TO WAR 



Bamforth, Ralptf 
Anderson, Bertram JY 
Bradley, Phillips' 
Brooks, George \\ '-. 
Browning, George C, 
Crowell, Wendell D- 
Higginson, A. Henry/ 
Connair, John J/ 
Moynihan, Jeremiah ]s 

*Cunnert, Charles? 
Lunt, Byron 
Cobb, Veranus/ 
Coan, Martin/- 
Hutton, Hubert Y( 
Danner, John < 
Dougherty, Matthew F, 
Davis, Edward Russell ' 
Boyce, W. James' 
Eldredge, Arthur S. Jiy 
Fleming, Irving R.. 
Foster, Percival H, 
Farquhar, Robert' 

f Giles, John F.. 
Giles, Thomas T.' 
Goodno, Ralph H/ 
Bamforth, Charles ^ 
Hart, Dr. Joseph S/ 
Briggs, Richard, Jr/ 
Kenna, John F/ 
Jensen, Alexander/ 

*Marston, Wilder E/ 
Nash, Rev. Norman B, 

* Died of Disease. 
f Killed in Action. 



Rocks, Charles lv. 
Rocks, Frederick A.- 
Rooney, Martin Js 
Ryan, James T./ 
Ryan, Edward H^ 
Robus, William G. 
Rider, Harry. 
Russell, George H/ 
Lahay, John B/ 
Seeckts, Albert' 
Delory, James* 
Snelling, Howard ' 
Snelling, Samuel W. 
Snelling, Harry Courtney 
Wheeler, Ruth Alden 
Stevens, Harold R^ 
Blodgett, Dr. Stephen H/ 
Tarbell, George G<< 
Loring, Dr. Robert G.* 
Wetherbee, Charles ~Es 
Weir, Robert J. VV., Jr. • 
Farns worth, Murray 
Hilliard, William M; 
Boyce, Edward ¥/ 
Pope, Reginald/ 
Shea, James J." 
Martin, Thomas BV 
Doten, Wallace V./ 
Sargent, Francis B. 
Collins, Joseph/ 
Shea, Joseph J. 



42 



REPORT OF THE SELECTMEN 



The Selectmen present the following report for the fiscal 
year ending December 31st, 1918. 

The Board was organized by the choice of Charles S. Smith, 
Chairman, and R. D. Donaldson, Secretary. 

On the previous page you will find an up-to-date record of 
the men of Lincoln who are in the Volunteer Service of the 
United States ; have been in the Draft ; or in some other ser- 
vice directly connected with the war. A panel was erected, 
without expense to the Town, in the center of the Town with 
these names upon it. 

Now that the war is over these men will be returning at 
intervals and we think that some suitable exercises should be 
held sometime during the year in recognition of the services 
that they have performed and also as a testimonial of what 
they have done, and expressing not only the gratitude of the 
people for these things, but also that so many will have re- 
turned; and also as a memorial to those who have given their 
lives for the cause. The committee appointed is as follows : 

Selectmen: Charles DeNormandie, C. Lee Todd, Edward 
E. Bradley, Donald Gordon, H. E. Warner, Thomas N. Cod- 
man, J. J. Kelliher, Lorenzo E. Brooks, Arthur S. Eldredge. 

A committee has been appointed to suggest a permanent 
memorial or tablet, to be erected in some convenient and suit- 



43 

able place, to the men who served in this war. The Public 
Safety Committee of the Town were asked by the State or- 
ganization to have such a committee appointed. The com- 
mittee appointed is as follows : 

Selectmen : Hugh Codman, Frederick A. Bosley, Russell 
G. Crook, Thomas L. Giles. 

The Town has been called upon to subscribe a certain quota 
to the Liberty Loans which have been floated during the year 
Up to date the Town has subscribed to the various Liberty 
Loans as follows : 

In the First and Second Liberty Loans subscriptions were 
taken in connection with the towns of Concord and Lexington 
so that Lincoln's contribution cannot be separated ; 

In the Third Liberty Loan Lincoln's alloted quota was 
$125,600 and the subscriptions amounted to $170,800. 

In the Fourth Liberty Loan the alloted quota was $251,200 
and subscriptions amounted to $309,350. 

This has shown the patriotism and loyalty of the citizens 
in a most impressive way. 

The Town has, besides this, contributed liberally to the 
various war charities ; the amounts thus contributed are as 
follows : 

In June, 1917, collections were taken in the Churches of the 
Town amounting to $901.51 ; 

In June, 1918, there was contributed to the Red Cross War 
Fund $2,835.08; 

In November, 1918, there was contributed to the United 
War Work Fund $5,392.45. 



44 

The following table gives the appropriations made by the 
Town during the year 1918, and the appropriations recom- 
mended by the Board to be made at the next Annual Meeting : 







The Selectmen 




: 


recommend the 




1 


Following appro- 


Appropriations ] 


priations for the 




for 1918 


ensuing year 


For Schools, $11,500.00 


$11,500.00 


Transportation for children, 


4,500.00 


4,500.00 


Support of Poor, 


500.00 


500.00 


Highways and Bridges, 


11,000.00 


11,000.00 


Library, the Dog Tax and 


500.00 


500.00 


Interest, 


500.00 


500.00 


Cemeteries (from Cemetery Fund 


) 500.00 


500.00 


Board of Health, 


200.00 


200.00 


Tree Warden, 


500.00 


500.00 


Suppression of Gypsy and Brown 






Tail Moths, 


2,000.00 


2,000.00 


Miscellaneous Expenses, 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


Hydrant and other Water Service, 


2,400.00 


2,400.00 


Waltham Hospital Free Bed, 


250.00 


250.00 


Street Lamps, 


1,600.00 


1,600.00 


Fire Department, 


200.00 


200.00 


Payment of Schoolhouse Bonds, 


3,000.00 


1,814.34 


Interest, Schoolhouse Bonds, 


840.00 


660.00 


Payment of Water Bonds (to be 






taken from Water Works 






Income) 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


Water Works Sinking Fund (to 






be taken from Water Works 






Income) 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 



45 

Appointments 

The following appointments have been made during the 
year : 

Sealer of Weights and Measures, Matthew H. Doherty. 

Weigher of Coal, Hay and Grain and other Commodities, 
Elmer A. Rollins. 

Inspector of Animals, Martin M. Welch. 

Special Police, Lorenzo E. Brooks, Herbert G. Farrar, John 
F. Farrar, C. S. Wheeler, Isaac Langille. 

Forest Warden, John J. Kelliher. 

Ballot Clerks and Tellers at State and Annual Election, 
James W. Lennon, Thomas L. Giles, Herbert G. Farrar, 
Thomas J. Dee, Charles E. Clark. 

Janitor of Public Buildings and Caretaker of Public 
Grounds, Edward Bannon. 

Early in the year Mr. Charles S. Wheeler, who had been 
Town Treasurer for more than 30 years, resigned on account 
of ill health. The Selectmen, after conference with Mr. 
Wheeler, appointed Mr. C. Lee Todd treasurer in his place 
and at the Annual Election in March Mr. Todd was duly 
elected by the Town. Mr. Todd has made a most efficient 
Town Treasurer as he has for many years been efficient 
treasurer of the various trust funds of the Town, and we hope 
that the citizens will re-elect him to this position for the ensu- 
ing year.- 

At the last Annual Meeting the Town voted to sell the old 
schoolhouse in the center of the Town at public auction. This 
sale was held soon after the meeting and the building was 
disposed of to the highest bidder for $300. Since the sale 
the building has been razed and only the foundation still re- 
mains on the ground. The Town, of course, still retains title 
to the ground on which the old schoolhouse stood. 



46 

The schoolhouse in the south part of the Town is not at 
present being used continuously for school purposes. It is, 
however, probable that it will be expedient and economical to 
have this building used for the purpose for which it was con- 
structed. Before this can be done it will be necessary to have 
some much needed improvements and repairs made, especially 
in connection with the heating. It is probable that it will be 
expedient to have an appropriation made for the same at the 
Annual Meeting. 

All the other public buildings in the Town are in reasonably 
good condition and no extensive alterations or repairs will be 
necessary during the coming year. 

Finances 

The Selectmen are glad to report that the financial con- 
dition of the Town is satisfactory and we believe it is possible 
to keep it permanently in this condition, provided the income 
now being received, and which we believe the Town clearly 
and equitably entitled to, can be continued, with reference 
particularly to the distribution of the Income Tax on all in- 
tangibles now collected by the State. It will, however, re- 
quire constant watchfulness in order to be able to keep the 
amount of distribution as much as it has been in the past, as 
every year bills are introduced in the Legislature to reduce the 
amount of this payment and divert it to other municipalities 
or, in its entirety, to the State Treasury. If legislation, such 
as is proposed, should ever be passed there would be an im- 
mediate advance in the tax rate of the Town of Lincoln, 
which would make the holders of real estate feel the burden 
of taxation by a very largely increased tax on real estate and 
tangible personal property. It is probable that instead of a 
$10 or $12 tax rate on $1,000, which we have had for many 
years, the rate would be increased to $25 or $30 per $1,000. 

The chairman of your Board, who has been in the Senate 
for the last two years, has used every possible effort with 



47 

others, and successfully so far, to keep the distribution of the 
Income Tax as was originally voted, but the pressure is very 
great to have it otherwise. 

The appropriation to be made this year of $1,814.34 will 
probably be the last appropriation necessary for the payment 
on the schoolhouse bonds, which issue was originally $55,000. 

The Sinking Fund Commissioners have not been able to 
purchase any of the outstanding bonds at par, therefore, they 
have kept the money which has been heretofore appropriated 
for the payment of said bonds, namely, $15,000, on interest 
and the accumulated interest on this sum reduces the appro- 
priation to be made this year to the amount named above. 

It is believed by the commissioners that if they are not able 
to purchase the outstanding bonds at par or better that this 
money should remain on interest and the interest will take care 
of the maturing coupons and that it will not be necessary to 
appropriate money hereafter either for the payment of the 
bonds or for the interest on the same. 

The outstanding bonded indebtedness on account of the 
Water Works is, as reported by the Treasurer, $67,000.00. 
There is, however, a sinking fund of $24,000.00 which leaves 
a net indebtedness on January 1st on account of the Water 
Works of $43,000.00. The Treasurer reported cash in the 
Water Works treasury of $3,756.22 and uncollected water 
rates of $3,379.00, or a total available cash for the Water 
Works treasury of $7,135.22. 

The Selectmen recommend that such part as is available of 
the above should be transferred to the General Treasury to 
reimburse the treasury for funds advanced to the Water 
Works a few years since and reported by the Treasurer, with- 
out interest as of January 1st, as $4,787.51. Apparently the 
finances of the Water Board are in better condition than at 
any time heretofore reported to the Town. 

The Treasurer reports cash in the treasury January 1st of 
$11,701.58 and on January 1st there were uncollected taxes 
of $3,420.39, or a total of available cash of $15,121.97. 



48 

There is, therefore, available cash in all departments, ex- 
cept in the Cemetery Department, in the hands of the Treas- 
urer a total of $22,257.19. 



Support of the Poor 

Mother's Aid has been continued as during the previous 
year and also aid, as reported, to Andrew Kilfoy. 



Fire Department 

The Fire Department has been conducted during the year as 
heretofore. For a more detailed report, reference is made to 
the Report of the Fire Engineer. 



Tree Warden 

During the year, Mr. John J. Kelliher, who has been Tree 
Warden for a number of years and also acted as constable for 
the Town, received an appointment in a neighboring town on 
the police force at a salary much in excess of that which he 
had been receiving from the Town of Lincoln. The Select- 
men did not think, under the circumstances, that it was for 
the best that Mr. Kelliher should be taken away. They, there- 
fore, made arrangements with him, which they believe to be 
in the best interest of the Town, so that he will receive for his 
various services to the Town $100 per month. 

Not only has Mr. Kelliher been a good man as tree warden, 
but his services have been invaluable in connection with spe- 
cial police and detective work. We think also that some other 
departments can avail themselves of the services of Mr. Kel- 
liher to advantage without increasing his salary or compen- 
sation in connection with the same, and we herewith suggest 
that the schoolhouse department might have Mr. Kelliher for 
truant officer without additional compensation; and that the 
cemetery commissioners could have his services for part of 
the time without additional compensation. 



49 

We appreciate that these suggestions are along the lines 
that would be suggested by a Town Manager, but we believe 
that they are pertinent in the interest of efficiency and 
economy. 



Highways 

The highways during the year have been under the charge 
of the same superintendent as in former years, Mr. William 
H. Sherman, and reference is made to his report for further 
infomation. 

In June, 1918, the Selectmen received a notice from the 
County Commissioners, copy of which is on another page of 
this report. In accordance with this notice a hearing was 
had by the Commissioners at the Fitchburg Railroad Station 
on Monday, July 29th, 1918, at ten o'clock in the forenoon. 

On August 2nd, 1918, the Selectmen received the letter 
which follows, together with the opinion of the engineer : 

East Cambridge, August 2, 1918. 
Charles S. Smith, Esq., 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Dear Sir: 

With regard to the road matters on which we held a hear- 
ing last Monday, we enclose a copy of a report of Mr. Pills- 
bury, Division Engineer of the Highway Commission, which 
has been forwarded to us. Very likely you have a copy of 
this report. 

We are inclined to follow these recommendations so far as 
we may do so in urging the town to continue the work of re- 
pairs as outlined by Mr. Pillsbury during the balance of the 
year. 

We are also ordering our engineering department to make 
complete surveys of the two roads, so that this information 



50 

will be at hand in case it is finally determined to carry on 
more extensive improvements when times are more favorable. 
The engineers in going over the road will observe carefully 
the conditions and may be able to make suggestions which will 
help in the meantime. 

Yours very truly, 

ALFRED L. CUTTING, 

Chairman. 
P. S. — We will inform the petitioners of the substance of 
this action. 

REPORT OF MR. PILLSBURY, DIVISION ENGINEER 
OF THE HIGHWAY COMMISSION 

Fitchburg Turnpike 

From the Weston line to the Concord line the entire length 
is 3.35 miles as measured by an odometer. This has the ap- 
pearance of being a gravel road, possibly macadam at some 
places, and has been covered from time to time with Tarvia 
"B" with more or less patching. This year it has not yet 
been treated with Tarvia "B" but is now being patched. It is 
at places too narrow. At many places the crown is too steep. 
There are some very bad curves not far from the Weston line. 
The traffic is such that this type of surface will not carry it 
satisfactorily, the traffic being too heavy for anything but a 
stone road. 

Walden Road 

This road branches off the Fitchburg Turnpike about 1.05 
miles from the Weston line and runs to the Concord line, 
thence continuing as Walden road in Concord. From the 
Concord line toward Concord we improved this with asphalt 
macadam, the Town, County and State working together. 
This road, together with the Fitchburg Pike to the Weston 
line, is the Waltham route to Concord, and considered as one 
road, is more important and has heavier traffic than the Fitch- 
burg Pike beyond its junction with Walden Road. 



51 

The continuation of Walden Road is about the same as the 
Fitchburg Pike except that at some places it is worse and 
others better, as far as the surface is concerned. 



Recommendations 

It appears to me that what should be done this year is to 
continue the repairs as they are now being made, viz : patch 
the depressions, smoothing the rough places and surface treat- 
ing with Tarvia "B" with the addition of some steam roller 
work at the worst places. This of course is but temporary 
and the patching and maintenance should continue to be kept 
up during the season. 

A survey should also be made of both roads at this time, so 
that a complete study can be made, with the idea of improv- 
ing the alignment at the bad curves, the grades and the widths, 
at such time as may be desired. 

In order to care for the traffic properly, this road should be 
reconstructed with a first-class asphaltic or tar macadam, with 
proper foundations and suitable drainage, but this would cost 
$30,000 a mile or more, and I do not believe under the pres- 
ent conditions and cost of work it should be done at this time. 
When it is taken up, if done in sections of a mile or more a 
year on the line of Walden Road thence over the Fitchburg 
Pike to the Weston line, it would not be long before there 
would be a first class road and the expense would not be 
noticed greatly. The Fitchburg Pike from the Walden Road 
to the Weston line would not have the traffic that this road 
has, in my judgment, and a less expensive surface would 
answer for that portion. 

I believe the County engineers could make the survey. 

I have talked with Mr. Smith and Mr. Kendall and told 
them that I thought of recommending as above. It seemed 
to meet with their views and they have both asked for a copy 



52 

of the above, as there is to be a County hearing on these roads 
within a very few days. 

(Signed) F. C. PILLSBURY, 

Division Engineer. 

The Selectmen think it is fair to assume that, notwith- 
standing what has taken place with respect to this highway, 
it will be advisable, provided the State and County co-operate, 
to have part, at least, of this line re-built. It is impossible to 
state whether conditions the coming year will be such as to 
make it advisable or not, but whenever conditions are again 
normal it is probable that it will be necessary to expend a con- 
siderable sum in connection with this re-building. Unless the 
Selectmen receive some additional information with respect 
to this matter before the Annual Meeting of the Town they 
will not recommend any special appropriation in connection 
with the same. 

It is not in a spirit of self complacency or with the idea 
that improvement cannot be made that we offer the follow- 
ing. Great improvements and more efficiency can be ob- 
tained in the conduct of the Town's business if the various 
departments would co-operate more and compare notes oftener 
with the Selectmen with a view to the greatest efficiency and 
economy. 

The Selectmen, in conclusion, cannot do better than to re- 
peat what was in the last Annual Report in connection with 
the conduct of the business of the Town, that they believe 
"that most of the business of the Town has been conducted 
in an economical and, in the main, in a business-like manner ; 
that the results obtained for the money expended have been 
as good or better than has been the case in previous years." 

The citizens have all of the necessities and most of the lux- 
uries that any community has ; the tax rate has been low ; the 
health of the people has been good — the epidemic of influenza 
has been quite general throughout the town, but very few per- 



53 

sons have been affected seriously. The general conditions 
under which we live compare favorably with those of any 
community similarly situated. 

The financial affairs of the Town are in excellent condition. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 
Selectmen of Lincoln. 

NOTICE OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Middlesex, ss. 

At a meeting of the County Commissioners for the 
County of Middlesex, at Cambridge, in said County, 
on the first Tuesday of June, in the year of our Lord 
one thousand nine hundred and eighteen, to wit, by 
adjournment at said Cambridge on the twenty-fifth 
day of June A. D. 1918. 

On the foregoing petition, Ordered, that the Sheriff of said 
County, or his Deputy give notice to all persons and cor- 
porations interested therein, that said Commissioners will 
meet for the purpose of viewing the premises and hearing the 
parties at the Lincoln Station, Fitchburg R. R., on Monday 
the twenty-ninth day of July, A. D. 1918, at ten o'clock in the 
forenoon, by serving the Clerk of the town of Lincoln, with 
a copy of said petition and of this order thereon, thirty days 
at least before said view, and by publishing the same in the 
Concord Enterprise and Waltham Daily Free Press Tribune, 
newspapers printed at said Concord and Waltham, three weeks 
successively, the last publication to be fourteen days at least 



54 

before said view, and also by posting the same in two public 
places in the said town of Lincoln, fourteen days before said 
view ; and that he make return of his doings herein, to said 
Commissioners, at the time and place fixed for said view and 
hearing. 

WM. C. DILLINGHAM, 

Clerk. 
Copy of petition and order thereon, 
Attest, 

WM. C. DILLINGHAM, 

Clerk. 



Concord, Massachusetts, June 13, 1918. 

TO THE MIDDLESEX COUNTY COMMISSIONERS : 

Respectfully represent the undersigned that the main road 
in the Southerly part of Lincoln which continues into Concord 
through Nine Acre Corner, and is sometimes called the Fitch- 
burg Turnpike, from Lee's Bridge at the Concord and Lin- 
coln line ; Easterly through the Southerly part of Lincoln to 
the town line between Weston and Lincoln, there joining the 
road known as the North Road in Weston, is in need of alter- 
ation and specific repairs. 

Also respectfully represent the undersigned that the road 
in Lincoln which is a continuation of Walden Street in Con- 
cord, said road in Concord running via the easterly end of 
Lake Walden ; from the Concord and Lincoln town line 
Southerly through the Town of Lincoln, crossing the Fitch- 
burg Railroad at Bakers Bridge and continuing to South Lin- 
coln where it joins the South Road in Lincoln, sometimes 
called the Fitchburg Turnpike ; is in need of alteration and 
specific repairs. 

Location of said highways more specifically shown in red 
on map attached to the original petition. 



55 

Wherefore we pray that you alter and make specific re- 
pairs on said highways. 

F. C. DUMAINE 

and 
eighteen others. 

A true Copy of petition and order thereon. 
Attest, 

GEORGE F. LESLIE, 

Deputy Sheriff. 



56 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 

I have examined the Treasurer's Report, also the securi- 
ties of the town, held by the Treasurer, the securities of the 
town, held by the treasurer of the Sinking Fund, and exam- 
ined all vouchers held by same. I find all correct. 

Following is an account of the money paid by the Treas- 
urer on the Selectmen's approval. 

JAMES W. LENNON, 

Auditor. 



57 



SCHOOLS 



Payments 

Teachers' Pay Roll for 1918, $5,324.47 

Martin Sherman, Driving School Barge, 114.00 

Herman T. Wheeler, Driving School Barge, 222.00 

Thomas J. Dee, Driving School Barge, 681.00 

Doherty's Barge, Carrying Children, 2,207.50 

Town of Concord, Tuitions of Pupils, 3,304.42 

City of Waltham, Tuition of Pupils, 211.25 

Mass. Teachers' Deduction Association, 86.53 

Boston & Maine R. R., School Tickets, 620.64 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Telephone Service 47.31 

Xational Express Co., Express, 17.51 

Boston & Maine R. R., Freight, 8.10 

Doherty's Garage, Automobile Service, 13.75 

M. H. Doherty, Truant Officer, 20.00 

Miss Hester Foster, Substitute Teacher, 3.00 

Miss Ruth Sherman, Substitute Teacher, 3.00 

Mrs. Letetia Doten, Substitute Teacher, 12.00 

Miss R. B. Bowker, Substitute Teacher, 3.00 

Mrs. Josephine Doherty, Substitute Teacher, 24.00 

Miss Isabel Peirce, Substitute Teacher, 12.00 

Charles S. Smith, Coal for Schools, 516.80 

Helen C. Strong, Teaching, Postage and Carfares, 50.00 

Thomas Benner, Postage, 10.08 

Lincoln Water Works, Water Service, 58.41 

Charles H. Moss, Cash paid for Supplies, 7.29 

George C. Cunningham, Mowing, 6.00 

H. A. Wood, M.D., Professional Services, 200.00 



58 

Miss Hattie Heath, Taking School Census, 10.00 

William C. Robus, Repairs on Bell, 2.50 

M. Stenmman, Repairs on Barge, 21.20 

T. J. McGann, Repairs on Barge, 29.50 

Daniel McAskill, Repairs on Barge, 3.00 

Miss Anna Strid, Lettering Diplomas, 3.15 

Daniels Printing Co., Printing, 6.25 

D. L. Hamilton, Labor and Supplies, 18.00 
Langille Bros., Labor and Supplies, 9.45 
Mrs. D. Campobasso, Labor, 4.20 
Herbert Neally, Labor and Supplies, 20.25 
I. N. MacRae, Labor and Supplies, 55.35 
A. R. McLeod, Supplies, 23.22 
A. N. Palmer Co., Supplies, 25.60 
Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 30.79 

E. E. Babb & Co., Supplies, 114.62 
So. Lincoln Dairy Co., Supplies, 3.00 
H. I. Dallinow Co., Supplies, 10.00 
Underwood Typewriter Co., Supplies, 80.00 
George Tolman Co., Supplies, 24.00 
Ideal School Supply Co., Supplies, .30 
Stemants, Supplies, 5.50 
Roger Sherman, Supplies, 1.44 
Little, Brown Co., Supplies, 7.34 
A. S. Spaulding & Bros., Supplies, 8.88 
Kenney Bros. & Wolkins, Supplies, 153.15 
Current Events, Supplies, 25.25 
Carter Ink Co., Supplies, .21 
Ginn & Co., Supplies, 43.27 
Hobbs & Warren, Supplies, 1.33 
Henry A. Grimwood, Supplies, 2.87 
Jordan Marsh Co., Supplies, 17.10 
Benj. H. Sanborn & Co., Supplies, 21.78 
Library Bureau, Supplies, 15.66 
E. Howard Clock Co., Supplies, 64.25 
H. B. Smith Co., Supplies, 1.42 
Palmer & Parker Co., Supplies, 3.84 



59 

Rosens Shop, Supplies, 3.35 

Houghton & Mifflin Co., Supplies, 18.78 

Quincy E. Brewster, Supplies, 1.65 

Chandler & Barker Co., Supplies, 13.15 

Louis, Stoughton, Drake Co., Supplies, 1.21 

Milton Bradley Co., Supplies, 10.60 

Edward Bannon, Janitorship, 500.00 

Total, $15,200.47 



60 



HIGHWAYS 



Payments 

William H. Sherman, Superintendent of Street, $1,344.25 

Timothy Ahearn, Labor, 942.75 

Joseph Mahan, Labor, 919.00 

William H. Ryan, Labor, 915.50 

Timothy J. Crowley, Labor, 812.75 

John W. Rooney, Labor 624.25 

Patrick Craven, Labor, 424.00 

Nicholas Cotona, Labor 10.50 

Town of Concord, Tar Kettle, 40.00 

Brown Grain Co., Grain, 1,244.03 

Charles P. Farnsworth, Care of Horses, 260.00 

H. L. Alderman, M.D., Professional Services, 5.00 

Boston & Main R. R., Freight, 428.21 

National Express Co., Express, .70 

Daniel McAskill, Shoeing and Repairing, 110.90 

John A. Burgiss, Shoeing and Repairing, 199.80 

Winchester Rock & Brick Co., Crushed Stone, 607.99 

Barrett Company, Tarvia, 2,456.57 

Joseph S. Hart, M.D., Rent of Barn, 125.00 

Miss Estella Brooks, Rent of Land for Crusher, 25.00 

Lincoln Water Works, Water, 12.00 

Daniel E. Sherman, Hay, 82.00 

Joseph S. Hart, M.D., Hay, 60.00 

Fred J. D. Bamforth, Mowing, 19.50 

Charles Skoglund, Inspecting Boiler, 5.00 

Mass. Highway Commissioners, Use of Oil on Detour, 426.42 

Doherty's Garage, Auto Service, .25 

New England Road & Machine Co., 1 Snow Plow, 68.50 

George E. Cunningham, Labor, 20.50 

Herbert G. Farrar, Labor of Men, 35.00 



61 



John F. Farrar & Son, Labor of Men, 


21.00 


M. Stearns, Labor, 


12.75 


Langille Bros., Labor, 


1.00 


Herbert W. Farrar, Sand and Gravel, 


127.55 


Lorenzo E. Brooks, Stone, 


35.00 


George Hill, Sand, 


42.60 


Mrs. Morrissey, Gravel, 


39.75 


Thomas J. Dee, Sand, 


3.75 


R. B. McKinn, Supplies, 


11.96 


Peter Perry, Supplies, 


23.00 


Kinny, Pump Co., Supplies, 


8.50 


Mass. Broken Rock Co., Supplies 


91.94 


New England Metal Co., Supplies, 


96.00 


Total, 


$12,748.17 



62 



WATER 



Payments 

James T. Laird, Superintendent and Engineer, $1,144.00 

James T. Laird, Use of Auto Truck, 114.12 

James T. Laird, Collecting Water Rates, 175.00 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Service of Telephone, 39.08 

Edison Electric Ill'g Co., Services, Power & Light, 1,791.52 

Edison Electric Ill'g Co., wire, 317.05 

National Express Co., Express, 3.79 

William C. Peirce, Rent of Land, 5.00 

Marcy Coal Company, Coal, 43.30 

Sumner Smith, Services as Water Commissioner, 77.00 

William H. Sherman, Services as W'ater Comm'r, 75.00 

Waltham Publishing Co., Printing, 2.00 

Rufus Warren, Rubber Boots, 6.00 

Town Treas., Coupons due March 1st, 707.50 
Commonwealth of Mass., Interest on $3,000 Bonds, 52.50 

Sinking Fund Commissioners, Sinking Fund, 1,500.00 

Charles Skoglund, Inspecting Boilers, 10.00 

Lincoln Post Office, Box Rent, .45 

First Nat'l Bank, Payment of two $500 Bonds, 1,000.00 

First Nat'l Bank, Coupons, Balance due Sept. 1 17.50 

First Nat'l Bank, Coupons, due March 1 17. 50 

First Nat'l Bank, Coupons, due May 1, 87. 50 

First Nat'l Bank, Coupons, due June 1 402 . 50 

First Nat'l Bank, Coupons, due Sept. 1, 760.00 

First Nat'l Bank, Coupons, due Nov. 1, 87.50 

First Nat'l Bank, Coupons, due, Dec. 1 , 402 . 50 

John A. Burgess, Repairs, 2.50 

W. S. Darly Co., Supplies, 15.00 

Rumsey Pump Co., Supplies, 45.68 

Walworth Mfg. Co., Supplies, 7.72 



63 

Chadwick Boston Lead Co., Supplies, 61 . 10 

Eagle Oil & Supply Co., Supplies, 12.50 

Rollin Bros., Supplies, 9.54 

Wadsworth Howland Co., Supplies, 16.75 

Chapman Valve Co., Supplies, 24.55 

Builders Iron Foundry, Supplies, 12.67 

Union Water Works Co., Supplies, 79.54 

Davis & Farnum Co., Supplies, 92.23 

Walworth Mfg. Co., Supplies, 17.56 

James L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 8.06 

Eddy Valve Co., Supplies, 49.05 
Fred A. Houdlett & Son, Supplies, 1,163.40 

Lincoln Highway Department, Labor of Men, 618.75 

Town of Concord, Labor on Frozen Water Pipes, 57.00 
Edison Elec. Ill'g Co., Labor on Frozen Water Pipes 23.38 

Egidio De Gregorio, Labor, 8.00 

Fritz Cunnert, Labor, 12.00 

Frank H. Cunningham, Labor, 21.00 

Dan McAskill, Repairs, 8.40 

Leroy Basley, Labor and Supplies, 491.94 

Langille Bros., Labor and Supplies, 1.88 

I. N. McRae, Labor and Supplies, 296.57 

Doherty's Garage, Use of Truck, 20.44 

A. G. Tomassello, Labor, 21.82 

Total, $12,037.34 



64 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Payments 



Edward Bannon, Janitorship of Public Buildings, $691.58 

Edison Electric Ill'g Co., Light for Town Hall, 59.62 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Service of Telephone, 148.10 

National Express Co., Express, 9.68 

Charles S. Wheeler, Collecting Taxes, 1916, 836.03 

Charles S. Wheeler, Abatement of Poll Tax, 1916, 74.00 

Charles S. Wheeler, Collecting Taxes, 1917, 268.73 
Charles S. Wheeler, Cash paid for Advertising and 

Recording Deeds, 19.18 

Daniels Printing Co., Printing, 484.92 

Charles E. Woodhull, Tuning Piano, 1917 and 1918, 19.00 

Charles E. Clark, Services at Town Elections, 10.00 

Thomas L. Giles, Services at Town Elections, 8.00 

Thomas J. Dee, Services at Town Elections, 13.00 

Francis Sargent, Services at Town Elections, 5.00 

Walter W. Johnson, Services at Town Elections, 5.00 

James W. Lennon, Services at Town Elections, 8.00 
George E. Cunningham, Services at Town Elections, 5.00 

Martin M. Welch, Inspecting Cattle, 55.92 

Isaac Langill, Services as Constable, 1917, 34.20 

George Cunningham, Services as Constable, 1917, 25.00 

John J. Kelliher, Services as Constable, 1917, 99.50 

W. L. Barnes, M.D., Returning Births, .75 

Massachusetts Bonding Co., Bond, 20.00 

Martin Ellis & Co., Moving Safe, 30.00 

P. B. Murphy, Printing, 2.40 

Doherty Garage, Auto Service, Police, 24.00 

Read, Burrage & Co., Insurance on Schoolhouse, 32.70 

John J. Kelliher, Special Police Service, 18.00 



65 

W. C. Peirce, Use of Truck, Memorial Day, 5.00 
Charles S. Wheeler, Penn. Insurance Fire Co., 297.00 
Thomas L. CTiles, Part Payment Collecting Taxes, 200.00 
Arthur Chapin, Services as Town Clerk and Regis- 
trar, and Postage, 59.50 
William C. Peirce, Services as Assessor and Clerk, 86.50 
William H. Sherman, Services as Assessor, 50.00 
Town Treas., Salary of 29 Firemen, 58.00 
C. Lee Todd, Postage, 15.35 
C. Lee Todd, Certification of Note, 2.00 
C. Lee Todd, Town Treasurer, 300.00 
Lorenzo E. Brooks, Special Police, 10.00 
W. F. Allen & Co., Printing, 15 . 75 
Anthony J. Doherty, Preparing Deeds, 6.50 
Thomas Groom & Co., Tax Collector's Book, 2.08 
M. H. Doherty, Services as Sealer of Weights and 

Measures, 40.00 

John F. Farrar, Services as Special Police, 10.00 
John F. Farrar, Services as Selectman, Overseer and 

Registrar, 200.00 
R. D. Donaldson, Services as Selectman, Overseer 

and Registrar, 200.00 
Charles S. Smith, Services as Selectman, Overseer, 

and Registrar, and Postage, 209.41 

Isaac N. McRae, Fighting Fires and Repairing, etc., 28.55 

Leroy E. Bazley, Labor, 95.79 

Isaac N. McRae, Labor at Town Hall. 4.30 

Fritz Cunnert, Fighting Fires, 4.40 

Mary A. Rooney, Storing School Barges,- 20.00 

R. D. Donaldson, Labor at Town Hall, 170.26 

R. D. Donaldson, Labor on Flag Pole, 127.19 

Thomas Groom & Co., 1 Assessors' Book, 1 . 50 

Charles S. Smith, Coal, 312.00 

James L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 5.15 

Wright & Potter Printing Co., Supplies, 6.75 

Winslow A. Eaton, Care of Fire Hose, 1917, 8.00 

Winslow A. Eaton, Fighting Fires, 1917, 2.00 



66 

Winslow A. Eaton, Special Police, 1917, 7.00 

James W. Lennon, Town Auditor, 125.00 

- 

Total,' $5,717.29 



MOTH 



Payments 

John J. Kelliher, Services as Superintendent, $957.00 

John J. Kelliher, Use of Truck, 83.00 

J. J. Moynihan, Labor, 324.88 

James Ryan, Labor, 352.88 

Ashley Cousins, Labor, 107.50 

William Costello, Labor, 244.50 

Andrew Doherty, Labor, 35.00 

Francis Corrigan, Labor, 116.00 

Charles Conlon, Labor, 27.00 

Edwin Graf, Labor, 42.00 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Telephone Service, 7.89 

National Express, Express, 1.36 

State Forestry Office, Balance due State, 104.72 

Doherty Garage, Auto Hire, 20.61 

I. N. McRae, Labor on Sprayer, 9.45 

Langille Bros., Filing Saws, 3.40 

Roger Sherman, Labor of Horse, 47.00 

Highway Department, Labor, 424.00 

Frost Insecticide Co., Supplies, 10.49 

Standard Oil Co., Supplies, 70.00 

James L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 6.37 

Total, $2,995.05 



67 
CEMETERY 



Payments 

Fritz Cunnert, Labor, $189.05 

George Haywood, Labor, 28.70 

B. W. Brown Co., Wheelbarrow, 6.00 

James L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 4.75 

Water Commissioners, Water Service, 20.00 



Total, $248.50 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Payments 



Thomas J. Dee, Rent of Fire House, Care of Hose, $36.60 

Doherty's Garage, Driving and Care of Fire Truck, 181.00 

Doherty's Garage, Supplies for Fire Truck, 22.69 

State Forestry Office, Supplies, 5.00 

E. & T. King & Co., Supplies, 23.58 



Total, $268.87 



LINCOLN LIBRARY 



Payments 



John F. Farrar, Treas., Appropriation, $750.00 

John F. Farrar, Treas., Dog Tax Returned, 14.40 

Total, $767.40 



68 



INTERESTS ON SCHOOL HOUSE BONDS 



Payments 



Charles S. Wheeler, Coupons, due Jan. 1, 1918, 
C Lee Todd, Coupons, due July 1, 1918, 

Total 



$420.00 
360.00 

$780.00 



STREET LIGHTS 





Payments 




Edison Electric IlPg Co. 


Service of Light, Dec, 1917 


, $144.99 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co. 


Service of Light, Jan. 1918, 


142.86 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co. 


Service of Light, Feb.. 


136.22 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co. 


Service of Light, March, 


134.49 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co. 


Service of Light, April, 


127.06 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co. 


Service of Light, May, 


123.71 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co. 


Service of Light, June, 


121.71 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co. 


Service of Light, July, 


121.33 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co. 


Service of Light, August, 


124.07 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co. 


Service of Light, Sept., 


129.01 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co. 


Service of Light, Oct., 


141.77 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co. 


Service of Light, Nov., 


154.11 


Total, 


$1,601.33 



PAYMENT OF SCHOOLHOUSE BONDS 



Payments 
Charles S. Wheeler, Treas., Payment of Bonds, 
due Jan. 1, 1918, 



$3,000.00 



69 
BOARD OF HEALTH 



Payments 



Martin M. Welch, Inspecting Meats, $87.25 

Charles E. Clark, Inspecting Meats 17.50 



Total $104.75 



SUPPORT OF POOR AND MOTHERS' AID 



Payments 



State Board of Charity, Care of Andrew Kilfoy, $366.90 

City of Waltham, Care and Burial of James Hanley 36.00 

Mrs. Agnes Gilbert, Mothers' Aid, 180.00 

Mrs. Agnes Lopez, Mothers' Aid, 15.00 



Total, $597.90 



INTEREST ACCOUNT 



Payments 
First National Bank, Discount on Note, $20,000, $639.03 



PAYMENT OF BORROWED MONEY 



Payments 
hirst National Bank, Payment of Note, $20,0000.00 



70 



HYDRANTS AND OTHER WATER SERVICE 



Payments 



Water Commissioners, 124 Hydrants to June, 1919, $1,860.00 
Water Commissioners, Water Service, Town Hall, 50.00 
Water Commissioners, Watering Troughs, 572.00 



Total, $2,482.00 



WALTHAM HOSPITAL 



Payment 
Treas. Waltham, Town Appropriation, $250.00 



71 



RECAPITULATION 



Payments 




Schools, 


$15,200.47 


Highways, 


12,748.17 


Water, 


12,037.34 


Payment of Borrowed Money, 


20,000.00 


Miscellaneous, 


5,717.29 


Moths, 


2,995.05 


Payment of Schoolhouse Bonds, 


3,000.00 


Hydrants and Other Water Service, 


2,482.00 


Street Lights, 


1,601.33 


Interest, 


639.03 


Interest on Schoolhouse Bonds, 


780.00 


Lincoln Library, 


767.40 


Mothers' Aid and Support of Poor, 


597.90 


Waltham Hospital, 


250.00 


Board of Health, 


104.75 


Fire Department, 


268.87 


Cemetery, 


248.50 


Total, 


$79,438.10 



72 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



Jan. 24, 1919. 
To the Board of Health : — 

I herewith submit the following report for the year end- 
ing Dec. 31, 1918: — 

Number of herds of cows, 80 

Number of milch cows, 553 

Number of young stock, 190 

Number of bulls, 22 

Number of pigs, 677 

Number of sheep, 93 

Number of goats, 1 

Number of cows quarantined, 7 

Number of cows quarantined and released,, 

Number of cows taken for tuberculosis, 7 

Number of horses quarantined 

MARTIN M. WELCH, 

Inspector of Annuals. 



73 



REPORT OF ANIMALS SLAUGHTERED 



Jan. 24, 1919. 
To the Board of Health : — 

I herewith submit the following report of animals 
slaughtered for the year ending Dec. 31, 1918: — 

Sheep, 4 

Pigs, 87 

Calves, 16 

Cattle, 19 

Pigs condemned, 3 

Calves condemned. 2 

Cattle condemned, 1 

MARTIN M. WELCH, 
Member of the Board of Health. 



74 



DOGS LICENSED IN 1918. 

There have been 105 Dog Licenses issued, as follows : 85 
Males, 8 Females, 10 Spayed Females, 2 Kennels, for which 
$309.00 has been paid to the County Treasurer. 

There have been 28 Licenses issued since December 1, 1918, 
which will be included in the return made to the County Treas- 
urer June 1, 1919. 

There have been 33 Resident Hunters' Licenses issued, for 
which $28.05 has been paid to the Commissioners of Fisheries 
and Game. 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 

Town Clerk. 



75 



REPORT OF FIRE ENGINEERS 

To the Board of Selectmen : — 

The Board of Fire Engineers herewith submit their eleventh 
annual report, ending December 31, 1918. 

Force 

Thirty-three men belong to the department: one chief, 
six engineers and twenty-six call men. There are three or- 
ganized companies. 

Apparatus 

The apparatus belonging to the Department is as follows : — 
Two wagons, one reel, one combination truck, twenty-five 
extinguishers, three ladders, hose, axes and plaster hooks. 

Location of Apparatus 

No. 2. Combination truck at Doherty's Garage, So. Lincoln. 
No. 3. Hose house, John Dee farm, Virginia Road, North 
Lincoln. 

Fires 

During the past year the truck has been called out as fol- 
lows : — 

Seven Chimney, five Grass, and eleven Wood. 

ISAAC N. MACRAE, Chief, 
THOMAS DEE, 
HERBERT FARRAR, 
H. S. COUSINS, 
J. J. KELLIHER, 
ANDREW DOUGHERTY, 
M. H. DOHERTY, 

Engineers. 



76 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF 
STREETS 



To the Board of Selectmen : — 

I herewith submit the following report for the year ending 
December 31, 1918: 

The roads are in about the same condition as last year, no 
new roads having been built except a little gravel road in 
different parts of the town where they were very bad. Owing 
to the high cost of everything and the difficulty of obtaining 
the different kinds of material for road work, it has been 
hard to keep the roads in good repair at times when they 
should have been repaired. I have tried every way possible 
to keep the expenditures down during the year. We have 
done a lot of work for the Moth and Water Departments, 
and other work outside of the Highway Work for the town, 
also some private work, thus helping to keep the men and 
teams at work most of the time. 

During the month of January of this year we teamed some 
sand and gravel, worked on water leaks, and did some out- 
side work. 

In February we did what snow work there was to do. The 
men chopped some wood and the teams worked for the Water 
Department, thawing out pipes, etc. 

The month of March was spent in teaming stone and gravel 
for road work, and for about two weeks we worked for the 
Water Department repairing leaks. 

In April we scraped some of the roads and filled up the 
holes and ruts, etc. 

During the first part of May the teams worked out, doing 
gardening and plowing, and during the latter part of the month 
worked for the Moth Department on the sprayers. 



77 

The first part of June we worked on the Moth Work, 
and the last part of the month we teamed gravel on the road 
near the Water Basin. 

In July we patched the roads, putting on what tarvia we 
could get, and did some haying. 

In August we scraped and fixed up the Turnpike, graveled 
road at Mr. Storey's corner, put in several culverts, and 
worked in the Cemetery, etc. 

During the month of September we worked on the detour 
in the north part of the town, patched roads, and teamed 
sand and gravel. 

In the month of October we put tarvia on the Depot and 
Farrar roads, and patched the roads where there were any 
holes. 

In November we teamed gravel and sand, widened the road 
at the corner near the house of W. C. Peirce, and worked 
for the Water Department on leaks, etc. 

In December we teamed sand and gravel, and worked at the 
crusher the last part of the month. 

Material Used: 

About 1,100 loads of sand and gravel, 16 carloads of crushed 
stone. 20,000 gallons tarvia, 900 gallons oil. 

All of the stone was used for patching the roads and filling 
the ruts. The oil was used on the detours in the north part 
of the town, the State paying half of the cost. 





Payments : 




Hay, grain, straw, etc.. 


approximately, 


$1,386.00 


Stone, gravel and sand. 


(< 


950.00 


Tarvia and Oil. 


a 


2,880.00 


Supplies, etc., 


a 


318.00 


Rent. 




150.00 



78 

Express and freight, approximately, $412.00 

Shoeing and Repairing, 323.00 
Superintendents Salary, 

Labor, Snow Work, etc., " 6,328.00 



Total, $12,747.00 

Less sum total which has been paid into the 
Town Treasury, and balance still due for 
labor, material, etc., approximately, 2,100.00 



Amount expended for the year, $10,647.00 

The Highway Department is in about the same con- 
dition as last year, except there has been one snow plow 
added. 

I recommend the sum of $10,000 for the maintenance of the 
roads, and $5,000 for construction this year, as there is a 
large amount of road that needs rebuilding. 

The guide boards are in about the same condition as last 
year. I have had some new signs made and put up at corners 
where it was dangerous. There are some other boards that 
need repainting soon. 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



79 



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80 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF 
SINKING AND TRUST FUNDS 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

1918 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $1,706.75 

Coupons, Town of Lincoln 3^s 105.00 

Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s (Serial) 120.00 

Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s, 1936 560.00 

Coupons, U. S. Liberty 4£s 44.70 

$500 Town of Lincoln Serial 4s due 500.00 

Cash, C. L Todd, Treasurer 1,500.00 

Interest on deposit 75 . 61 



$4,612.06 



1918 Cr. 

Dec. 31. Cash, $3,000 U. S. Liberty AH of 1928 $3,023.40 

Three payments, $1,500 U. S. Liberty 4*s of 1938 750 00 

Balance 838.66 



$4,612.06 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

$2,500 Town of Lincoln 4s, Serial Bonds, due 1912 to 1923. 
$14,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due September, 1936. 
$3,000 Town of Lincoln 3Js, due September, 1932. 
$3,000 U. S. Liberty 4is of 1928. 
$1,500 U. S. Liberty Als of 1938 (3rd payment made). 

Respectfully submitted, 

C LEE TODD, Treasurer 



81 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

FUND FOR PURCHASE OF SCHOOLHOUSE BONDS 

1918 Dr. 

Jan. 12. Balance $15,481 . 17 

Interest 704.49 

$16,185.66 

1918 Cr. 

Dec. 31. Cash on deposit $16,185.66 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



82 

TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

GEORGE G. TARBELL LEGACY TO THE 
LINCOLN LIBRARY 

1918 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $29.60 

Dividends, West End St. Ry., common 3.50 

Dividends, American Tel. & Tel. Co 32.00 

Dividends, West End St. Ry., preferred 52.00 

Dividends, Boston & Lowell R. R. Co 64.00 

Coupons, United Fruit 4Js, 1923 22.50 

American Tel. & Tel. Co. rights .10 

Interest on deposit 7.31 



$211.01 



1918 Cr. 

Dec. 31. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer, Lincoln Library.. $181.31 
Balance on deposit, principal account 29.70 



$211.01 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

8 Shares Boston & Lowell Railroad Co. 
13 Shares West End Street Railway Co., preferred. 
8 Shares New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 
4 Shares American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
1 Share West End Street Railway Co., common. 
$500 United Fruit Co., 4^s, 1923. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



83 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

GEORGE RUSSELL LEGACY TO THE 
LINCOLN LIBRARY 



1918 D 



Jan. 1. Balance $33.02 

Dividends, Fitchburg Railroad Co 35.00 

Interest 2 . 75 



1918 Cr. 



$70.77 



Dec. 31. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treas. Lincoln Library $37.75 

Balance on deposit, principal account 33.02 



$70.77 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

7 Shares Fitchburg Railroad Co., preferred. 

2 Shares New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



84 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

JULIA A. BEMIS FUND FOR BENEFIT OF 
LINCOLN LIBRARY 

1918 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $35.34 

Dividends, West End St. Ry., common 7.00 

Coupons, U. S. Rubber 5s 50.00 

Interest 2.79 

$95.13 
1918 Cr. 

Dec. 31. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treas. Lincoln Library $59.79 

Balance on deposit, principal account - 35.34 

$95.13 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

2 Shares West End Street Railway Co., common. 
$1,000 United States Rubber 5s, 1947. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



85 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY TO THE LINCOLN 
LIBRARY 

1918 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $18.33 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 5s 50.00 

Dividends, West End St. Railway common 3.50 

Interest 1 . 64 

$73.47 

1918 Cr. 

Dec. 31. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treas. Lincoln Library $55.14 

Balance, principal account 18.33 

$73.47 
The Fund is invested as follows : 

1 Share West End Street Railway common. 
$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 5s, 1946. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



86 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR LINCOLN LIBRARY 

1918 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $70.87 

Dividends, West End St. Railway common 17.50 

Coupons, U. S. Rubber Co. 5s 100.00 

$2,000 American Tel. & Tel. 4s sold 1917 addition 11.00 

Interest 7 . 62 



$206.97 



1918 Cr. 



Dec. 31. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treas. Lincoln Library $125.12 

Balance on deposit, principal account 81.87 

$206.97 

The Fund is invested as follows : 

5 Shares West End Street Railway common. 
$2,000 United States Rubber 5s, 1947. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



87 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR SILENT POOR 



1918 D 



Tan. 1. Balance $585.94 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. 4s 100.00 

Interest 29.48 

$715.42 

1918 Cr. 

June 15. Cash, Selectmen's order $75 . 00 

Dec. 31. Balance on deposit, income account 479.26 

Balance on deposit, principal account 161 . 16 

$715.42 
The Fund is invested as follows : 

$2,000 United States Rubber 5s, 1947. 
Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR TOWN HEARSE 

1918 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $27.76 

Dividend, Pennsylvania Railroad Co 45.00 

Interest on deposit 2. 55 

$75.31 
1918 Cr. — 

Dec. 31. Balance on deposit $75.31 

The Fund is invested as follows : 

15 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 
Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



89 

THE BEMIS LECTURE FUND TRUSTEES 

In Account with 

THE BEMIS LECTURE FUND 

1918 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $ 620.78 

Dividends, Pennsylvania Railroad Co 150.00 

Boston & Providence R. R 100.00 

Fitchburg Railroad pfd 50.00 

Old Colony Railroad 70.00 

Boston & Albany R. R 87.50 

American Tel. & Tel. Co 480.00 

Boston & Lowell R. R 240.00 

West End St. Ry. pfd 40.00 

Great Northern Ry. pfd 175.00 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. 5s 50.00 

Southern Railway 4s 120.00 

New York Railways 4s 40.00 

U. S. Rubber Co. 5s 50.00 

American Tel. & Tel. rights 1 .50 

Interest on deposit 17.43 



$2,292.21 



1918 Cr. 

The Powell Printing Co $ 12.50 

Madame Leveroni, Farrizio and Richmond Recital 140.00 

Donald D. MacMillan. Lecture 150.00 

P. A. Carter, Postage and Labor 3.00 

Harry C. Collins, Lecture 50.00 

Powell Printing Co., programs 12.50 

W. C. Robus, Services at hall 10.00 

Dr. Russell H. Conwell, Lecture 150.00 

Cella-Tak-Demailly Trio and Lillian Ff. Thorn- 

quist, Concert 1 15 . 50 

Francis Wilson Huard, Lecture 100.00 

P. A. Carter, Postage and Labor 3.00 

May 17. W. F. Allen, Circulars 2.25 



Feb. 


20. 


Mar. 


22. 


Mar. 


28. 


Apr. 


2. 


Apr. 


4. 


Apr. 


9. 


Apr. 


15. 


Apr. 


18. 


Apr. 


26. 


May- 


8. 


May 


13. 



90 

May 18. Doherty Garage, to April 26th 11.35 

Nov. 12. Glenn Frank, Lecture 31 . 10 

Nov. 19. P. A. Carter, Postage and Labor 3.30 

Nov. 21. "Thomas Wilfred, Concert 100.00 

Nov. 26. Powell Printing Co., programs and slips 12.00 

Nov. 30. Dr. George E. Vincent, Lecture 100.00 

Dec. 7. Chief Stronghart, Lecture 35.00 

Dec. 14. Dr. Henri S. Beland, Lecture 250.00 

Dec. 31. Balance 1,000.71 



$2,292.21 
The Fund of $30,000 is invested as follows : 

50 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 

30 " Boston & Lowell Railroad Co. 

10 " Boston & Providence Railroad Co. 

10 " Boston & Albany Railroad Co. 

10 " Fitchburg Railroad Co. 

10 " Old Colony Railroad Co. 

10 " West End Street Railway pfd. 

10 " New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 

10 " Boston & Maine Railroad Co. 

60 " American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 

50 " Northern Idaho & Montana Power Co. pfd. 

25 " Great Northern Railway Co. pfd. 

$4,000 New York Railways Co. 5s, 1942. 

$1,000 New York Railways Co. 4s, 1942. 

$3,000 Southern Railway Co. 4s, 1956. 

$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 5s, 1946. 

$1,000 United States Rubber Co. 5s, 1947. 

Respectfullv submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



91 



REPORT OF CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

No unusual or unnecessary work in connection with the 
cemeteries has been attempted by the commissioners during 
the past year, principally on account of the difficulty -of secur- 
ing labor and on account of the high price of the same. The 
cemeteries have, however, been kept in a neat and attractive 
condition. 

During the year the senior member of the Commissioners, 
Mr. Julius E. Eveleth, has died. Mr. Eveleth has always 
taken a very keen interest in the cemetery work and has been 
a valued member of the Commission. His associates on the 
Board will miss his genial and gentlemanly presence as they 
will also miss his wise advice and counsel. 

We trust the Town will be able to select a man who will 
take as deep an interest and who will in all probability have a 
long term of service before him, and it seems desirable that a 
man should be elected to the Commission who can in all rea- 
sonable probability continue as commissioner from year to year 
so that the Commission can work out comprehensive improve- 
ments, which would not be possible otherwise. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
FRITZ CUNNERT, 

Cemetery Commissioners 



92 



THE TOWN TREASURER 
In Account with 
THE LINCOLN CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 
1918 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance on hand (General Fund in Middlesex 

Institution for Savings) $930.48 

Lot No. 78 20.00 

Lot No. 106 20.00 

Dividend (3) Fitchburg R. R. Co. pfd 7.50 

" (3) American Sugar Co. pfd 21.00 

(2) Union Pacific R. R. Co. pfd 12.00 

Interest accrued at Middlesex Inst, for Savings 510.72 

Interest accrued at Middlesex Inst, for year 1918 167.23 

Interest on deposit .28 



$1,689.21 



1918 Or. 



Dec. 31. Paid, Treasurer, Town of Lincoln $1,000.00 

Deposit in Middlesex Inst, for Savings 608.43 

Balance on hand 80 . 78 



$1,689.21 

The following is a list of Securities held by the Town Treasurer: — 

Four Shares American Sugar Refining Co., preferred stock. 
Three Shares Union Pacific R. R. Co., preferred stock. 
Two Shares Fitchburg R. R. Co., preferred stock. 

Also the following funds for the care of lots in cemetery, all of 
which are deposited in the Middlesex Institution for Savings : — 

Orilla J. Flint Fund, $300.00. 

Samuel Hartwell Fund, $300.00. 

John H. Pierce Fund, $500.00. 

Maria L. Thompson Fund, $500.00. 

Annie A. Ray Fund, $300.00. 

George F. Harrington Fund, $100.00. 

Francis Flint Fund, $250.00. 

(Signed) C. LEE TODD, 

Town Treasurer. 



93 



ASSESSORS REPORT 



The Board of Assessors submit the following report : — 

Number of residents assessed on property, 238 

non-residents assessed on property, 90 

assessed on polls only, 162 

acres of land assessed, 8,740 

dwelling houses assessed, 278^ 

horses assessed, 235 

cows assessed, 486 

neat cattle other than cows assessed, 60 

swine assessed, 249 

sheep assessed, 165 

Value of land, exclusive of buildings, $598,725.00 

" buildings, exclusive of land, 1,031,345.00 

" real estate, 1,630,070.00 

" personal estate. 241,821.00 



Total valuation $1,871,891.00 

State tax, $10,340.00 

County tax. 5,124.27 

State Highway tax, 1,908.50 

Town grants, 41,490.00 

Number of polls, 342. 
Rate, $12.00 per $1,000.00 

Deduct for Income tax, $35,392.64 

Deduct for Corporation tax, 323.44 

Total deductions, $35,716.08 

Amount to be collected, $23,830.69 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, 

Assessors. 



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108 



REPORT OF BOARD OF WATER 
COMMISSIONERS 

The Water Commissioners present herewith their annual 
report : — 

During the year 1918-1919 twelve regular and four special 
meetings were held, at which W. H. Sherman and S. Smith 
were present. Little but routine work has come before the 
Board this year. Again few leaks have appeared, the most 
serious and most expensive being on the old cement lined pipe 
on Pierce's Hill, which was once struck by lightning and prob- 
ably jarred. Here the line was dug out in 4 places the past 
year, and replaced by about 25 lengths of iron pipe. In late 
years the Board has been fortunate in being able to borrow 
or buy from Concord or Waltham what little pipe it needed 
for repairs, the pipe yard being empty, but for this replace- 
ment it was necessary to buy a carload of 100 lengths, 69 of 
which are now in the pipe-yard. It is very probable that this 
pipe will soon be used to replace more cement lined pipe. 

In the Spring of 1918 a few mains and many services were 
frozen and after paying Concord for thawing Lincoln pipes, 
the Board decided to fit out an electric thawing apparatus for 
the benefit of its patrons. Therefore a coil of wire, which is 
stored at the Pumping Station, was secured from the Edison 
Company at a cost of $317.05, and an apparatus was set up 
under the supervision of Mr. MacRae and the Edison Com- 
pany. The pipes were thawed at an expense of $550.00, the 
cost of thawing private services being $257.50, $167.50 of 
which has not yet been collected. If these bills remain un- 
paid, the Board will feel reluctant in thawing out services for 
the owners if occasion arises again. 

The electric pump has done all the pumping and is in good 
condition. The steam pump is in readiness to start and the 
boilers have been examined and passed, but it is very doubtful 
if they would stand the strain of much pumping. One of the 



109 

boilers has been on the market, but no good offers have been 
received. 

While the reservoir is kept full practically all the time, the 
Town might face a serious situation if the electric pump 
stopped for a time. The Board warned the Town of this fact 
a year ago, but no action was taken, and while warning the 
Town again it wishes to impress upon the inhabitants the 
gravity of the situation, — the possibility of the Town without 
water. Still Pumps are expensive now, and the old one would 
not sell for much in a trade. Like most machinery, pumps are 
being improved all the time, and may sell cheaper, therefore 
the board, mindful of the risks above mentioned, rather than 
recommend buying a new pump immediately, would recom- 
mend waiting until the need seemed more pressing, and, if 
possible, until prices decrease. 

The profit and loss sheet shows the financial condition of 
the water works. Most of the increase in expense was due to 
thawing pipes last winter. 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, 

SUMNER SMITH, 

Water Commissioners of Lincoln. 



110 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS FOR YEAR 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1918 



Lincoln Water Works, Lincoln, Middlesex County, Mass. 

General Statistics 

Population by census of 1915, 1310. 

Date of construction, 1874. 

By whom owned, Town of Lincoln. 

Source of supply, Sandy Pond, Lincoln, Mass. 

Mode of supply, Pumping. 

Pumping Statistics 

Rumsey Triplex Pump, lOj/2" x 12" 25 horse-power motor. 

Power, electricity. 

Power furnished by the Edison Electric Illuminating Com- 
pany of Boston. 

Total water pumped for the year, 87,000,000 gallons. 

Average static head against which pump works, 148.5 feet. 

Average dynamic head against which pump works, 160 feet. 

Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses (in- 
cluding salaries and power), $4,425; per million gallons 
pumped, $50.86. 

Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, power, 
salaries, interest, repairs and renewals, and depreciation. 
$184 per million gallons pumped. 

Rainfall, 25.94 inches. 



Ill 



Statistics Relating to Distribution System 



Mains 

1. Kind of pipe used, 
cement lined, cast iron, 
wood stave, galvanized 
iron. 

2. Sizes, \y 2 " to 12". 

3. Extended during the 
year, 300 ft. 

4. Discontinued during the 
year, none. 

5. Total now in use, 26,571 
miles. 

6. Number o f hydrants 
added during the year, 2. 

7. Number o f hydrants 
(public and private) now 
in use, 125. 

8. Number . of stop-gates 
added during the year, 
none. 

9. Number of stop-gates 
now in use, 133. 

10. Number of blow-offs, 30. 

11. Range of pressure on 
mains, 40 pounds to 102 
pounds. 



Services 

12. Kind of pipe, galvanized 
iron and cement lined. 

13. Sizes, %" to 4". 

14. Discontinued, none. 

15. Number of service taps 
added during the year, 6. 

16. Number now in use, 338. 

17. Average length of ser- 
vice. 12'+. 



112 



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113 



WATER WORKS DEPARTMENT 



OUTSTAXDIXG BONDS 



Issue of 1900, due 1930. 


$23,000.00 


Issue of 1902, due 1932, 


9,000.00 


Issue of 1903, due 1933, 


5,000.00 


Issue of 1904, due 1934, 


5,000.00 


Issue of 1906, due 1936, 


14,000.00 


Issue of 1907, due 1937, 


4,000.00 


Issue of 1907, due one each year, 


4,500.00 


Issue of 1911, due one each year, 


2,500.00 



$67,000.00 



114 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH FOR 
THE YEAR ENDING FEBRUARY 1, 1919 

Lincoln, Feb. 1, 1919. 

Contagious diseases officially reported during the year : — 

Pulmonary ........ 2 

Influenza ......... 66 

MARTIN M. WELSH, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 
CHARLES E. CLARK, 

Board of Health. 



115 



TREE WARDEN'S REPORT 

The Tree Warden submits to the Town his report for the 
year 1918:— 

During the past year the work of this Department has been 
confined principally to Moth-Work, creosoting, Gypsy Moth 
nests on our roadside trees, and trees in the Cemetery. This 
work continued until the middle of May when we started 
spraying operations. 

All the roadside trees were sprayed and about two hundred 
acres of woodland with very good results. We also sprayed a 
large number of orchards with the small power sprayer. 

The roadside thinning and cleaning, a certain amount of 
which we do each year, has been omitted this year on account 
of the shortage of labor, but must be done in the coming year 
as it is very essential to the Moth-Work and to the looks of 
our roadsides. The total expenditure of this Department, 
$2,995.05, of which there has been returned to the Town 
Treasurer $1,986.29 on account of private work, leaving a 
net cost of $1,008.76. I recommend that $2,500.00 be appro- 
priated for Moth and Tree W r ork. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Tree Warden. 



116 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

The Trustees on the following pages submit the report of 
the Treasurer and Librarian for the year ending December 
31, 1918. 

The Library has sent during the past year a great many 
books to Camp Devens. Books to the soldiers over-seas were 
sent through the Boston Public Library. 

The Library has also done what it could to help the Food 
Administration in its efforts to conserve food. 

The Trustees ask for an appropriation of $500.00 and the 
Dog Tax. 

C. LEE TODD, 

Chairman of the Trustees. 



117 






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118 



STATISTICAL REPORT OF THE LINCOLN 

PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR THE YEAR 

ENDING JANUARY 1, 1919 

Number of volumes in Library, February 1, 1918, 10,684 

Increase by purchase, 126 

Increase by gift, 8 

Number of volumes in Library, January 1, 1919, 10,818 

Total delivery of books for year, 7,561 

Largest delivery in one day, 137 

Smallest delivery in one day, 31 

Books delivered, fiction, 3,154 

Books delivered, non-fiction, 2,572 

Books delivered, juvenile. 1,835 

Number of days Library was open, 100 

Gifts of books, periodicals, etc., have been received during 
the year, from Miss Annie Bartlett, Miss Addie Campbell, Mr. 
Emile Cafbonel, Mrs. Scott Doten, Mrs. W. Harrington, Miss 
Hattie B. Heath, Mr. Otto H. Kahn, Mrs. H. Palmer, Jr., Mr. 
John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Miss Bertha Scripture, Mr. William 
H. Sherman. Mr. J. Waldo Smith, Mrs. James J. Storrow, 
Mi<s Mabel Washburn. 



119 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIRBARY 

Accessions to the Library for 1918 

FICTION 

Adams, Samuel Hopkins. Our square and the people 

in it 931.26 

Barbusse, Henri. Under fire: Story of a squad 1034.24 

Barr, Amelia E. An Orkney maid 1034 . 23 

Benson, E. F. An Autumn sowing 921 .27 

Birmingham, G. A. The Major's niece 915.36 

Blindloss, Harold. Girl from Kellor's 1026.25 

Bosher, Kate Langley. Kitty Canary 1017.25 

Brown, Alice. Flying Tctiton and other stories 1033.26 

Cable, George W. The Chapdelaincs 1022.25 

Cable, George W. Lovers of Louisiana 917.31 

Connor, Ralph. The Major 932.24 

Cooper, Elizabeth. Heart of OSonoSan 931.23 

Copplestone, Bennet. Lost naval papers 1011.26 

Dillon, Mary. Comrades 1011.23 

Dodge, Henry. The yellow dog 915.35 

Ford, Sewell. Shorty McCabe looks 'em over 1027.30 

Green, A. Mystery of the hasty arrow 932.23 

Grey, Zane. U. P. trail 915.32 

Gilbreath, Olive. Miss Americana 1026.27 

Kelland. Clarence Budington. The source 1034.22 

Locke, William. The rough road 917.32 

McCall, Sidney. Sunshine beggars 1024.27 

McFee. Aliens 1017.26 

McHarg, William, and Balmer, Edwin. The Indian drum 936.25' 

Marshall, Archibald. Abington Abbey 915.33 

Mitchell, J. A. Drowsy \ 931.25 

Nicholson, Meredith. A reversible Santa Clans 1027.19 

O'Brien, Editor. Best short stories of 1917: And the 

year book of the American short story 1011.25 

Ollivant, Alfred. Boy Woodburn: a story of the Sussex 

Downs 1017.24 

Pier, Arthur Stanwood. The Son decides: the story of 

a young German-American 1024.29 



120 

Poole, Ernest. His second wife 1034.25 

Porter, Eleanor H. Oh, money! money! 921.26 

Porter, Gene Stratton. Daughter of the land 915.13 

Pryce, Richard. Statue in the wood 926.20 

Rinehart, Mary. Amazing interlude 921.25 

. Long live the King 1013.25 

Sinclair, May. Tree of Heaven 723 . 25 

Swinneton, Frank. Nocturne 915.34 

Tarkington, Booth. Seventeen 932.25 

Tinyare, Marcelle. To arms! La veillee des armes.... 724.24 

Train, Arthur. The earthquake 1026.28 

Walpole, Hugh. The green mirror: :a quiet story 1034.22 

Watts, Mary L. The Boardman family 1033.25 

Weir, F. Roney. Merry Andrew 744.25 

Wells, Carolyn. Vicky Van 1024.28 

Weston, George. The apple tree girl: the story of little 

Miss Moses who led herself into the promised land 1024.20 

White, Stewart. Simba 1011.24 

TRAVEL AND DESCRIPTION 

Cooper, Clayton Sedgwick. Brazilians and their country 423.19 
Franck, Harry A. Vagabonding down the Andes: be- 
ing the narrative of a journey mostly afoot, from 

Panama to Buenos Aires 421 .24 

London, Charmian K. (Mrs. Jack London). Our Hawaii 422.19 

Reade, Arthur. Finland and the Finns 423.21 

Richardson, Robert Charlwood. West Point: an inti- 
mate picture of the National Military Academy and 

of the life of the Cadet 365.3 

Ross, Edward Alsworth. , Russia in upheaval 422.20 

Seton, Ernest Thompson. The Arctic prairies: a canoe 
journey in search of the Caribou, of 2,000 miles: 
being the account of a voyage to the region north 

of Aylmer Lake ' 423.22 

Stuck, Hudson. Vogages on the Yukon and its tribu- 
taries. A narrative of summer travel in the interior 
of Alaska 423.20 

BIOGRAPHY 

Davis, Charles Belmont. Adventures and letters of 

Richard Harding Davis 636 . 20 

Blackwell, Alir^ .Stone, Editor. Little grandmother of 



121 



the Russian revolution: reminiscences and letters 

of Catharine Breshkovsky 636.19 

Clark, John Spencer. Life and letters of John Fiske. 

2 vols 636.22 

Holmes, John Jay. Life and letters of Robert Collyer, 

1823-1912. 2 vols 532.2 

Morley, John, Viscount. Recollections. 2 vols 532.1 

Rothschild, Alonzo. "Honest Abe": a study in integrity 

based on the early life of Abraham Lincoln 636.18 

Schultz, James Willard. Bird woman (Sacajawea). The 

guide of Lewis and Clark; her own story: now 

first given to the world by J. W. Schultz 636. 18 

Tolstoi, Leo. Journal of Leo Tolstoi 636.21 



HISTORY 

Hazen, Charles Downer. Alsace-Lorraine under German 

rule 

. Catskill water supply, 1905-1917. A general 



description and brief history 



365.4 
352.15 



USEFUL ARTS 

Albaugh, Benjamin F. The gardenette: or city back yard 

gardening, the sandwich system 214.14 

Blanchan, Neltje. Bird neighbors; an introductory ac- 
quaintance with one hundred and fifty birds com- 
monly found in the gardens, meadows and woods 
about our homes. (New Nature Library.) 

Jordan, David Starr, and Evermann, B. W. American 
food and game fishes: a popular account of all the 
species found in America north of the Equator, 
with keys for ready identification, life histories 
and methods of capture 121.8 

King, Caroline B. Caroline King's cook book 146.33 

Mackay, L. Gertrude. The housekeeper's apple book: 

over two hundred ways of preparing the apple.... 137.30 

Partridge, Pauline Dunwell and Conklin, Hester Martha. 

Wheatless and meatless days 147.30 

Rogers, Julia A. The tree book: popular guide to a 
knowledge of the trees of North America, their 
uses and cultivation 121.9 

Rose, Mary Swartz. Everyday foods in war-time 146.34 



122 

EUROPEAN WAR AND ALLIED SUBJECTS 

Aldrich, Mildred. On the edge of the war zone: from 
the battle of the Marne to the entrance of the 

Stars and Stripes 1331 . 17 

Angell, Norman. America and the new world state.... 1535.27 
Beith, Ian Hay, Major. All in it: "K. (I.)" Carrieson.. 1311.7 
Bell, Bernard Iddings. Right and wrong after the war: 
an elementary consideration of Christian morals in 

the light of modern social problems 1321 . 16 

Dawson, Coningsby. Glory of the trenches: an inter- 
pretation 1321.19 

. Out to win: story of France in America.... 1321.11 

Eddy, Sherwood. With our soldiers in France 1311.4 

Empey, Arthur Guy. First call; guide posts to Berlin 1321.7 
Fosdick, Harry Emerson. Challenge of the present 

crisis 1311.6 

Fraser, Helen. Women and war work 1321.8 

Gerard, James W. Face to face with Kaiserism 1331.22 

Grow, Malcolm C. Surgeon Grow: an American in the 

Russian fighting 1331 .24 

Hopkins, Albert A. Our army and how to know it; 

our navy and how to know it 1321.9 

Kautz, John Iden. Trucking to the trenches: letters 

from France, June-November, 1917 1321.18 

Lauder, Harry. A minstrel in France 1537.24 

Lauzanne, Stephen. Fighting France 1321.17 

Leathern, W. H. The comrade in white 1311.5 

Lees, G. Frederic, Translator. Crusader of France: 
letters of Captain Ferdinand Belmont of the Chas- 
seurs Alpins (August 2, 1914, December 28, 1915), 

translated from the French 1321 . 5 

Letters from an American soldier, Edwin Austin Ab- 
bey, 2d 1321 . 13 

Norton, Grace Fallow, Translator. Odyssey of a tor- 
pedoed transport 1321 . 14 

Peat, Harold R. Private Peat 1321 . 16 

Schreiner, George Abel. Three years in warring Cen- 
tral Europe 1331.23 

Stuermer, Harry. Two war years in Constantinople: 
sketches of German and young Turkish ethics and 

politics 1331 . 25 

Tiplady, Thomas. The Cross at the front: fragments 

from the trenches 1311 .3 



123 

Usher, Roland G. Winning the war: sequel to "Pan 

Germanism." 1321 . 10 

Wells, H. G. In the fourth year: anticipations of a 

world peace '. 1321 . 15 

Whitehair, Charles S. Out there 1321.12 

Wright, Richardson. Letters to the mother of a soldier 1337.22 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Carroll, Robert S. Mastery of nervousness, based on 

the re-education of self 1535 .26 

Hagedorn, Herman. You arc the hope of the world.. 1536.31 

Lansbury, George. Your part in poverty 1317.18 

Marden, Orison Swett. How to get what you want.... 1336.26 
Nasmyth, George. Social progress and the Darwinian 
theory: a study of force as a factor in human re- 
lations 1535.28 

Olgin, Moissaye J. Soul of the Russian Revolution.... 1331.20 

Poole, Ernest. "The dark people"; Russia's crisis 1331.21 

RELIGION, PHILOSOPHY 

Glover, T. R. Jesus of history 1122.16 

Hankey, Donald. The church and the man 1137.15 

JUVENILE 

Barbour, ' Ralph Henry. Keeping his course 1224.28 

Church, Alfred J. The Aeneid for hoys and girls, told 

from Virgil in simple language 1224.27 

Collins, A. Frederick, and Collins, Virgil I). Boy's 

book of submarines 1212.27 

Dowd, Emma C. Polly and the Princess 1212.28 

Little, Frances (Fannie Caldwell Macauley). Camp 

Jolly: or the secret finders in the Grand Canyon.. 1212.25 

Newbold, Henry. Book of the happy warrior 835.25 

Olcott, Frances Jenkins. Bible stories to read and 
tell. One hundred and fifty stories from the Old 
Testament with references to the Old and New 
Testaments, selected and arranged, by F. J. Olcott 1211.24 
Olcott, Frances Jenkins. Talcs from the Persian genii 1211.25 
Scott, E. C. Elizabeth Bess. "A little girl of the sixties" 1212.29 
Sweetser, Kate Dickinson. Ten American girls from 
history: 1. Pocahontas, the Indian girl of the Vir- 
ginia forest: 2, Dorothy Quincy, the girl of Colonial 



124 

days who heard the first gun fired for Independence; 
3, Molly Pitcher, the brave gunner of the battle of 
Monmouth; 4, Elizabeth Van Lew, the girl who 
risked a'll that slavery might be abolished and the 
Union preserved; 5, Ida Lewis, the girl who kept 
lime rock burning; a heroic life saver; 6, Clara 
Barton, "The angel of the battlefields"; 7, Virginia 
Reed, Midnight heroine of the plains in pioneer 
days in America; 8, Louisa M. Alcott, author of 
"Little women"; 9, Clara Morris, the girl who won 
fame as an actress; 10, Anna Dickenson, the girl 

orator 1224 . 26 

Wells, Carolyn. Patty Blossom. 1214.26 

. Two little women on a holiday 1214.27 

Wells, H. G. Floor games 1234.27 

Williams, Hawley. Straight ahead 1212.26 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE 



SCHOOL YEAR 1918 




128 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

ANTHONY J. DOHERTY, Chairman, Term expires 1919 
CONRAD P. HATHEWAY, Secretary, Term expires 1921 
AMOS R. LITTLE Term expires 1920 

Superintendent of Schools 
CHARLES H. MORSS 

Supervisor of Manual Training and Drawing 
WALTER F. BRACKETT 

Supervisor of Sewing and Cooking 
ALICE C. JUDGE 

Teachers 

Grammar Grades VII-VIII 
ANNA L. STRID 

Grammar Grade VI 
MARION E. DAVIS 

Grammar Grade V 
GLADYS E. WINNING 

Grammar Grades III -IV 
LOUISE M. DUCLOS 

Primary Grade 11 
JENNIE M. WHEATON 

Primary Grade I 
HATTIE B. HEATH 

Attendance Officer 
MATTHEW H. DOHERTY 

Janitor 
EDWARD BANNON 



129 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Winter Term begins Thursday, January 2, ends Wednesday, 
April 16; fifteen weeks. 

Spring Term begins Monday, April 21, ends Friday, June 
28; ten weeks. 

Fall Term begins Tuesday, September 2, ends Friday, De- 
cember 19; sixteen weeks. 

Winter Term begins Monday, January 5, 1920. 

Length of school year, 1918-19, thirty-six and one-half 
weeks. 



130 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

In the past year the committee had to engage the services 
of a superintendent to fill the vacancy made through the resig- 
nation of Mr. Thomas E. Benner, who entered the service 
of the United States and left early in May. Mr. Charles H. 
Morss was engaged for this position and assumed charge at 
the opening of the schools on Sept. 3rd. 

Several changes in the teaching department have been made 
also during the past year. Miss Helen C. Strong, principal 
and teacher of the seventh and eighth grades, resigned to ac- 
cept a much better position and very material increase in 
salary. Miss Gladys Tyler and Miss Georgianna Keith also 
resigned to accept positions elsewhere. Miss Isabel Brooks 
was engaged early in the summer to fill one of these vacancies. 
She remained, however, less than three weeks, having been 
offered a position elsewhere. To fill the extra vacancies Miss 
Gladys E. Winning was engaged to teach the fifth grade ; Miss 
Louise M. Duclos the combined third and fourth, and Miss 
Marion E. Davis the sixth grade. Miss Strid was transferred 
from the sixth grade to the combined seventh and eighth 
grades to fill the vacancy made by the resignation of Miss 
Strong. Owing to the resignation of Mrs. Abbie P. Smith, 
supervisor of sewing, and Mrs. Bertha Joslin, supervisor of 
cooking, these two positions were again combined and Miss 
Alice C. Judge engaged to supervise both. 

Lincoln, like many other towns and cities, was obliged to 
close its schools owing to the influenza epidemic, thereby los- 
ing several weeks of the fall session. In order, however, to 
make up in part for this lost time, it has been decided to con- 
tinue the spring term two weeks longer, closing June 27th, 
instead of June 13th, as scheduled. 



131 

The problem of school transportation is ever present. At 
the beginning of the school year, the School Committee, with 
the School Superintendent, studied carefully the various barge 
and automobile routes and made minor changes which seemed 
necessary. Against strong opposition, these changes have 
been kept in effect. The routes as laid out are so arranged 
as to best serve the majority of the pupils, and the maximum 
of transportation service is now given for the money appro- 
priated, and to continue the transportation as now arranged 
will require the sum of four thousand dollars for the year, 
exclusive of the High School transportation. 

During the past year the tuition in Concord High School 
has been advanced from eighty to ninety dollars per pupil. 

The railroad transportation also increased slightly. 

The number attending the Concord High School at the be- 
ginning of the present year is thirty. Of this number it is 
expected four only will graduate the coming June. The new 
class to enter Concord in September next will be by estimate 
from fifteen to eighteen. It will be noticed, therefore, that 
the tuition cost for the present year will of necessity call for 
a very material increase. 

The committee has been able to keep practically within 
the appropriation granted the past year. The present year, 
however, presents a very different situation. It is the unanimous 
opinion of the committee, supported and urged by the super- 
intendent, that if we are to get good teachers and efficient 
work from our teaching force, we must pay the salaries that 
such work commands, for in no other way will we be able to 
prevent the too many changes heretofore occurring in our 
teaching force. For the reason of the anticipated increases in 
the salaries of the teachers, of the High School tuition and 
of the transportation, together with the amount required for 
the replacement of books as recommended by the superintend- 
ent, the committee feels that they will require for the run- 



132 

ning of the schools for the current year the sum of eighteen 
thousand dollars. 

The report of the superintendent and a summary of the 
school expenses for the past year is annexed hereto. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ANTHONY J. DOHERTY, 
AMOS R. LITTLE, 
CONRAD P. HATHEWAY. 



133 



SUMMARY OF SCHOOL EXPENSES 
FOR YEAR 1918 

Appropriation $15,500.00 

Salaries of Superintendent and Teachers 5,524.87 

High School Tuition 3,515.67 

High School Transportation 555.70 

Transportation of Children (Local) 3.156.00 

Incidental Repairs on School Building 55.35 

Barges, Repairs, etc 73.95 

Janitor Service 500.00 

Fuel 516.80 

Water Service 58.41 

School Physician 200 00 

Supplies 693 21 

Miscellaneous 292.14 



$15,142.10 



134 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

To the School Committee of the Town of Lincoln : — 

Since September the work of the school has suffered so 
many interruptions from the epidemics of influenza and the 
minor ills that there is very little upon which to base a report 
of work accomplished. The new school year opened Septem- 
ber 3, but on account of the severity of the epidemic, it was 
decided to close on the twenty-fifth after only seventeen days 
of session, although there were no cases among the children., 
and the general health was excellent. When work was again 
resumed, October 21, the attendance was so poor that results 
were entirely unsatisfactory. On December 10 a case of in- 
fluenza was discovered in the school. This exposure led in 
a few days to several more cases among both children and 
teachers, and schools were again closed and the vacation ex- 
tended to January 2. So out of a normal term of eighty days 
of uninterrupted work we had only fifty-three days with 
many interruptions. 

Four grades, the first, second, fifth and sixth, are now of 
sufficient size to require a separate room each, so that we 
have only two rooms of mixed grade, one having grades three 
and four, the other grades seven and eight. The teaching 
force is organized as follows : 

Began 

Name Grade Graduate of Service 

Charles H. Morss Superintendent Harvard Sept., 1918 

Anna L. Strid Grades VII, VIII Framingham Xor. Jan., 1918 

Marion Davis Grade VI Framingham Xor. Jan., 1919 

Gladys E. Winning Grade V Lowell Normal Sept., 1918 

Louise M. Duclos Grades III, IV Framingham Xor. Oct., 1918 

Jennie M. Wheaton Grade II Framingham X'or. Oct., 1917 

Hattie B. Heath Grade I Quincy Training Sept., 1897 

Alice C. Judge Domestic Science Concord High Sept., 1918 

Walter F. Brackett Manual Training Xormal Art Sept, 1909 



135 

Of the class room teachers only one has been in the service 
of our schools more than two years and the majority have 
seen service with us less than one year. 

To secure greater uniformity of results departmental teach- 
ing has been started in a small way in the upper grades. The 
Superintendent has taken charge of the arithmetic and also 
teaches one class in history. The penmanship of all the 
classes is in charge of Miss Strid. The advantage to the 
pupil of continuing under the same teacher through a series 
of years is obvious and need not be dwelt upon. The plan, 
however, for its successful accomplishment, necessitates the 
permanence of the teaching force and that can be secured in 
only one way, by paying them sufficient salaries so tempting 
offers from other places will not lure them from us. The 
frequent change of teachers that has been the rule rather than 
the exception for a number of years is sufficient explanation 
of any defect that we may find in the work of the school. 

All the rooms of the building are now in use, even the do- 
mestic science room being used for recitation purposes on 
the days when not used by the teacher of domestic science. 
This room is needed every day for some classes and it could 
be so used if the cooking equipment were removed to the 
girls' playroom. This playroom is entirely unsuited for the 
purposes of play unless it be in the warm weather when all 
the windows can be opened. It could, however, be made to 
accommodate the domestic science classes in the same manner 
as the playroom for the boys was turned into a manual train- 
ing room. 

The cooking room needs additional equipment to enable 
each girl to get practice in the various lessons. Since the re- 
moval of the individual kerosene stoves the experimental work 
has suffered. Classes of twelve and fourteen girls cannot well 
work over one coal range, each doing some experiment; and 
the result is that some gain the experience while the others 



136 

learn by looking on — not the most advantageous method. Now 
that the electric current has been brought to the building it 
would not be a difficult matter to install a half dozen electric 
hot plates, so that each group of two could take all the experi- 
ments of each lesson and perform them for herself. These 
experiments would not take the place of the lessons on the 
range which some seem to fear would be the result of intro- 
ducing modern methods. We are now conducting cooking 
classes as chemistry was taught half a century ago, one tries 
an experiment and the rest observe. In no study is it truer 
than in domestic science that "we learn to do by doing." 

In the report of last year your Superintendent said "We 
are a disunited school unit and the chief reason is that we 
have no place of assembly as a school. We need badly an 
assembly hall." This will strike any school worker as true 
and inevitable even in a very cursory review of the school. 
While it is not practicable to urge an assembly hall at present 
we can attain approximately the advantages of one by mak- 
ing arrangements for gathering together the primary grades 
in one of the first floor rooms and the grammar grades in the 
old manual training room on the second floor. Such an ar- 
rangement would necessitate only a few extra chairs and a 
piano for each floor. A piano is very much needed, for a 
school without a piano misses one of the greatest aids to unity. 
Let us have pianos. 

In the last few years very few of the text books have been 
replaced and those now in use have passed the age limit and 
should be discarded. It is neither hygienic nor moral to con- 
tinue to use books so dirty and tattered as to be an offense 
to several senses. We shall need many new books, and also 
reference books for teaching geography and history, in which 
departments of study we are deficient. 

No details of the accomplishment of work by the different 
classes is advisable at this time as the teachers are too new 



137 

to the work, the interruptions to its continuity too frequent, 
and the time too short for your superintendent to have tested 
the quality of the work in all the subjects. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES H. MORSS, 

Superintendent of Schools. 

Lincoln, Mass., January 20, 1919. 



139 



WARRANT 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln in said 
County : 

GREETING:: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you 
are hereby required to notify the legal voters of said Town of 
Lincoln, qualified to vote at Town Meeting for the transaction 
of Town affairs, to meet in the Town Hall, in said Lincoln on 
Monday, the third day of March next at 11.30 o'clock, A. M., 
by posting a copy of this Warrant, by you attested, in each of 
the Post Offices and in some other public place in said Town, 
seven days at least before the fourth day of March, then and 
there to act on the following Articles : 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot will be open at 
12 o'clock noon and may be closed at 6.30 o'clock P. M. 

ARTICLE 1. To choose a Moderator. 



140 

ART. 2. To bring in their votes for the following 
Town Officers, and any other officers required by law to be 
elected by, ballot or otherwise, also any committees, com- 
missioners and trustees. 

One Town Clerk for one year. 

One member of the Board of Selectmen for three years. 

One member of the Board of Assessors for three years. 

One member of the Board of Health for three years. 

One Treasurer for one year. 

One Collector for one year. 

One Auditor for one year. 

Two Constables for one year. 

One Tree Warden for one year. 

One member of the Trust Fund Commissioners for three 
years. 

One member of Trustees for Free Public Lectures for 
three years. 

One member of the School Committee for three years. 

One member of the Board of Water Commissioners for 
three years. 

One member of the Board of Cemetery Commissioners 
for three years. 

Also to vote "Yes" or "No" upon the following ques- 
tion : "Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in this Town?" 

ART. 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committee, Commissioners and Trustees. 



141 

ART. 4. To appropriate money for necessary and ex- 
pedient purposes of the Town and enact anything in rela- 
tion to the same. 



ART. 5. To determine the rrtanner of collecting taxes 
for the ensuing year. 



ART. 6. To determine the compensation of the Col- 
lector of Taxes for the ensuing year. 



ART. 7. To see if the Town will authorize the Treas- 
urer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow during 
the municipal year, beginning February 1, 1918, in antici- 
pation of the collection of taxes for the said year, such 
sums of money as may be necessary for the current ex- 
penses of the Town, but not exceeding the total tax levy 
for the said year, giving the notes of the Town in payment 
therefor payable in one year from the date thereof. All 
debts incurred under authority of this vote shall be paid 
from taxes of the present municipal year. 



ART. 8. To see if the Town will choose a Committee 
on Claims under the provisions of Section 3, Article 6 of 
the By-Laws. 



ART. 10. To see if the Town will appropriate any money 
for the Middlesex County Farm Bureau. 



ART. 10. To see what action the Town will take with 
reference to the old schoolhouse in the center of the Town. 



142 
HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

And make due return of this Warrant with your doings 
thereon to the Town Clerk at or before the time for the meet- 
ing aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this nineteenth day of February, in 
the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and eighteen. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



143 



By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. 

At the Superior Court, within and for the County 
of Middlesex, Anno Domini, 1897. 



The following By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln, in said 
County, are presented to this Court for approval, to wit : — 

"ARTICLE I. 

Town Meetings. 

Section 1. The annual town meeting shall be held on the 
first Monday of March in each year. 

Sect. 2. Notice of every town meeting shall be given by 
posting copies of the warrant calling the same, attested by 
the officer making service thereof, in each of the post-offices 
within the town, and in one of the churches, or one other 
public place, within the town, not less than seven days be- 
fore the day appointed for such meeting. But when, in the 
judgment of the selectmen, the interests of the town require 
a meeting to be held without giving so long a notice, a 
meeting may be called by posting attested copies of the 
warrant in the places above mentioned, and by leaving ■ 
printed copy thereof at each dwelling-house within the 



144 

town, at least three days before the time appointed for the 
meeting; provided that in such cases the selectmen shall 
certify that, in their opinion, the interests of the town re- 
quire that a town meeting be called upon a notice of less 
than seven days, which certificate shall be made upon, or 
attached to, the original warrant, and shall be served as a 
part thereof. 



ARTICLE II. 

Finances. 

Section 1. The financial year shall commence with the 
first day of February and end with the thirty-first day of 
January annually. 

Sect. 2. The town treasurer shall have the custody of 
all funds belonging to the town except sinking funds, trust 
funds and funds for which other provision is made by law ; 
and he shall pay no money from the treasury except upon a 
draft signed by a majority of the selectmen, stating the 
account to which the same is chargeable. Such draft shall 
be sufficient authority to the treasurer to pay the same, and 
the payment thereof shall discharge him from all liability 
on account of the money so paid. 

Sect. 3. The water commissioners and all other boards, 
committees and officers shall, on the first day of each month, 
pay to the town treasurer all sums collected by them the 
month previous to the custody of which the treasurer is 
entitled. 

Sect. 4. A majority of the water commissioners, school 
committee, or of any board, or committee, and any officer 
having charge of the expenditure of an appropriation, shall 



145 

approve in writing - all accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls 
properly chargeable to such appropriation, and shall trans- 
mit the same with his or their approval to the selectmen. 
All other accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls shall be ex- 
amined by the selectmen and, if proper, shall be approved 
by them. The selectmen shall label all accounts, claims, 
bills and pay-rolls which have been approved either by 
themselves or by the other officers before mentioned, and 
shall keep a record thereof in a book kept for the purpose, 
stating the persons to whom payable, the amounts and 
dates thereof, and the funds, or appropriations, from which 
the same are payable. 

Sect. 5. Drafts signed by a majority of the selectmen, 
stating the accounts to which the same are chargeable, 
shall be drawn upon the treasurer for the payment of all 
sums by law payable from the treasury to the common- 
wealth or county, final judgments of courts, bonds, notes, 
and scrip of the town and interest thereon and money pay- 
able to the commissioners of the sinking fund and to the 
trustees of the public library; and also for the payment of 
all accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls which have been 
approved in the manner provided in the previous section. 
Such drafts shall not be negotiated, but shall be transmitted 
by the selectmen directly to the treasurer accompanied by 
the approved bills or other documents for the settlement of 
which the drafts are drawn. 

Sect. 6. The treasurer shall file and safely keep all ap- 
proved and receipted accounts, claims, bills, and pay-rolls, 
and all vouchers, cancelled bonds, notes, scrip, and other 
evidences of indebtedness of the town which have been paid 
from the treasury. 

Sect. 7. No draft shall be drawn by the selectmen unless 
there is sufficient appropriation to pay the same, except for 



146 

sums by law payable to the commonwealth or county, final 
judgments of courts, bonds, notes and scrip of the town and 
interest thereon, and money payable to the commissioners 
of the sinking fund. 

Sect. 8. The selectmen and treasurer respectively shall 
make a record, in a book kept for the purpose, of each ap- 
propriation, with a list of the drafts drawn against such 
appropriation, and shall make a record of all bonds, notes, 
scrip or other evidence of indebtedness of the town, signed 
or countersigned by them. 

Sect. 9. When the bills contracted or approved by any 
board, committee, or officer have exhausted the entire ap- 
propriation for such board, committee or officer, they shall 
mcur no further expenditure, except in cases where such 
expenditure may be required by law ; and it shall be the 
duty of each board, committee or officer before the close of 
the financial year to approve all accounts, claims, bills and 
pay-rolls chargeable to their appropriation. During the 
interval between the thirty-first day of January in each 
year and the time of making the next annual appropriations, 
the selectmen, school committee and water commissioners, 
in order to meet the liabilities of their several departments, 
incurred in the carrying on of the work entrusted to them, 
shall have authority to make expenditures and payments 
from the treasury from any available funds therein, and the 
same shall be charged against the next annual appropria- 
tion. Such expenditures and liability incurred for any 
purpose shall not exceed one-fourth the entire amount 
appropriated for that purpose in the previous year. 

Sect. 10. Unless the town shall expressly otherwise vote, 
no extension of water pipes shall be made unless before the 
work of construction is begun one or more of the persons 
whom it is proposed to supply with water by means of such 



147 

extension, shall file with the town clerk a bond with sureties 
satisfactory to the water commissioners, conditioned to pay 
to the town for five years next following the completion of 
such extension and the letting of water into the same, a sum 
sufficient, together with the net annual income from such 
extension, to amount annually to five per centum of the total 
cost thereof. 

ARTICLE III. 

Town Seal. 

Section 1. The design of the town seal shall be: a circle, 
in the border the words "Lincoln. . Incorporated in 1746 as 
a precinct; in 1754 as a Town"; in the center, a shield, in 
the chief or upper part of which on a cross, gules, a fleur- 
de-lis, gold, from the old seal of Lincoln, England, and in 
the base of the shield a view of the present town hall ; crest, 
the old chestnut tree standing upon the common in Lincoln ; 
in saltire two shepherd's crooks ; the device thereof being as 
follows : 

Sect. 2. All deeds and other legal documents made, given 
or entered into by the town requiring a seal shall be sealed 
with the town seal, and signed in behalf of the town by a ma- 
jority of the selectmen. 

Sect. 3. The town clerk shall have the custody of the 
town seal. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Records. 

Section 1. The town clerk shall record in full in a book 
kept for the purpose all written contracts, deeds and other 



148 

instruments to which the town is a party except such instru- 
ments as may by law be recorded in the Registry of Deeds ; 
and it shall be the duty of any board or officer executing or 
receiving such written contract, or other instrument, to 
deliver the same forthwith to the town clerk for the pur- 
pose of record. It shall be the duty of the town clerk to 
see that all conveyances of real estate to the town are prop- 
erly recorded in the Registry of Deeds. 

Sect. 2. The town clerk shall keep a file of all town 
reports, reports of all committees chosen by the town, and 
all original documents relating to the affairs of the town 
which may come into his possession. 



ARTICLE V. 

Books. 

Section 1. Books, records and laws received by the town 
from the commonwealth shall be deposited in the public 
library building. 

Sect. 2. It shall be the duty of the town officer by whom 
any book mentioned in the preceding section is received, to 
cause the same to be at once deposited in the public library 
building. 

Sect. 3. Such books may be used by the inhabitants of 
the town within such building, and may be taken therefrom 
upon written receipt to the librarian for a period not ex- 
ceeding one day at any one time for use in any town meet- 
ing, or by or before any committee or official of the town. 



149 

ARTICLE VI. 
Suits and Controversies. 

Section 1. The selectmen may compromise claims and 
suits to which the town is a party, provided that they shall 
act upon the advice of counsel when the amount claimed by 
or against the town exceeds $200.00. 

Sect. 2. The selectmen shall have, unless it is otherwise 
voted by the town, full authority as agents of the town to 
institute and prosecute suits or other proceedings in the 
name of the town before any tribunal, to appear and repre- 
sent or defend the town before any tribunal in all suits and 
other proceedings against the town or in which the town 
has an interest, to employ counsel for the purpose aforesaid 
and for other purposes when it may be expedient to do so, 
and to take all necessary and proper measures for the 
protection of the interests and rights of the town. 

Sect. 3. If the town shall, at any meeting called for the 
purpose, choose a committee on claims, such committee shall 
have and exercise exclusively all the powers and duties con- 
ferred upon the selectmen by the two preceding sections. 

ARTICLE VII. 

Reports and Publications by the Town. 

Section 1. The annual reports of the town officers, 
boards and committees shall be prepared in form suitable 
for printing on or before the tenth day of February in each 
year. The selectmen shall cause such reports to be printed 
and distributed to the legal voters of the tow r n seven days 
at least before the annual meeting. 



150 

Sect. 2. The selectmen shall cause to be printed and 
bound each year with the annual reports of the town offi- 
cers, boards and committees, a copy of the records of the 
town meetings during the preceding year; a statement of 
all devices, bequests and donations to the town during the 
preceding year ; a list of all laws of the commonwealth 
accepted by the town during the year ; all by-laws adopted 
by the town since the preceding annual report ; copies of 
the laying out, alteration, locating anew or discontinuance 
of any highway or townway within the limits of the town 
during the preceding year ; and a statement of all outstand- 
ing bonds, notes and obligations of the town for the pay- 
ment of money. 

Sect. 3. The selectmen shall from time to time cause to 
be printed a sufficient number of copies of the by-laws of 
the town and shall incorporate therewith a list of the laws 
of the commonwealth which have been accepted by the 
town. 



ARTICLE VIII. 

Truants. 

Section 1. Any minor being an habitual truant, and any 
child between the ages of seven and fifteen years found 
wandering about the streets or public places within the town 
having no lawful occupation or business, not attending 
school, and growing up in ignorance, and such children as 
persistently violate the reasonable rules and regulations of 
the public schools, may upon conviction thereof be commit- 
ted to the Middlesex County Truant School at Chelmsford, 
Mass., or to any other place provided by the town within 
its limits, for confinement, instruction, and discipline. 



151 

ARTICLE IX. 

Public Regulations. 

Section 1. No person shall coast upon any public street 
or part thereof after the selectmen have posted a notice 
prohibiting coasting upon such street or part thereof. 

Sect. 2. No person, unless authorized by law, shall 
break or dig up any part of any street without a written 
permit therefor from the selectmen. Every person who 
after obtaining such permit shall obstruct or render unsafe 
any public street, shall guard the same by a proper fence or 
railing, and by lights during the night time, subject to the 
approval of the selectmen. Such permit may be revoked at 
any time. 

Sect. 3. No person shall be or remain in any doorway, 
or upon any stairs, doorstep, portico or other projection 
from any house or building, or upon or against any wall or 
fence on or near any street or public place, after having been 
requested by the owner or any occupant of the premises or 
by any constable or police officer to remove therefrom. 

Sect. 4. No person shall make, write, print, paint, cut or 
post any indecent or obscene marks, words, figures or signs 
upon any fence, building, post, tree or other object exposed 
to public view. 

Sect. 5. No person shall wilfully injure, mar, deface or 
destroy any fence, signboard, guideboard, lamp-post, lamp 
or lantern in any street or public place, nor extinguish any 
street light, nor extinguish or remove any light placed to 
denote an obstruction or a defect in any public street or way, 
without proper authority to do so. 



152 

Sect. 6. Any person who shall offend against any of the 
provisions of this article shall forfeit and pay, for each 
offense, ,a sum not exceeding twenty dollars." 

Which said By-Laws being seen and understood by the 
Court, are on this nineteenth day of June, A. D. 1897, 
approved. 

In testimony that the foregoing is a true copy 
of record, I hereto set my hand and affix the seal 
of said Court, this twenty-second day of June, 
A. D. 1897. 

RALPH M. SMITH, Ass't Clerk. 



INDEX 



Town Officers, 1918 .... 

Proceedings of Town Meetings, 1918 
Town Clerk's Report .... 

Men of Lincoln Who Have Gone to War 

Recommendations for Appropriations 

Selectmen's Report 

Auditor's Report 

Expenditures for the year 

Report of Assessors 

Treasurer's Report 

Report of the Cemetery Commissioners 

Report of Town Treasurer in acc'nt Cemetery Co 

Report of Commissioner of Sinking Fund 

Report of Treasurer Commissioners Trust Funds 

Report of Treasurer Bemis Lecture Fund 

Report of Water Commissioners . 

Report of Tree Warden .... 

Report of Board of Health .... 

Report of Superintendent of Streets 

Report of Inspector of Animals 

Report of Fire Engineers .... 

Report of Trustees of Lincoln Public Library 
Library Statistics ...... 

Report of Treasurer of Lincoln Library 
List of Accessions to Library 

School Reports 

School Expenditures ..... 
Report of School Committee .... 
Report of Superintendent of Schools 
School Calendar ...... 

Warrant 1919 

By-Laws of the Town ..... 



Page 

3-5 

7-36 

37-41 

41 

44 

42-55 

56 

57-71 

93-107 

79 

91 

92 

80-81 

82-88 

89-90 

108-113 

115 

114 

76-78 

72-73 

75 

116 

118 

117 

119-124 

127-137 

133 

130-132 

134-137 

129 

139-142 

143-152 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



OF THE 



Town of Lincoln 

FOR THE YEAR 1919 

ALSO 

THE REPORTS OF THE 

SCHOOL AND OTHER COMMITTEES 

FOR THE YEAR 1919 




boston: 

DANIELS PRINTING COMPANY, PRINTERS 

77-79 WASHINGTON STREET NORTH 

I920 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



OF THE 



Town of Lincoln 

FOR THE YEAR 1919 

ALSO 

THE REPORTS OF THE 

SCHOOL AND OTHER COMMITTEES 

FOR THE YEAR 1919 




boston: 

DANIELS PRINTING COMPANY, PRINTERS 

77-79 WASHINGTON STREET NORTH 

I920 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1919-1920 



Town Clerk. 
WILLIAM C. PEIRCE 

Selectmen and Overseers of the Poor. 

CHARLES S. SMITH Term expires 1921 

ROBERT D. DONALDSON " '* 1920 

JOHN F. FARRAR " " 1922 

Board of Health. 

MARTIN M. WELCH Term expires 1922 

CHARLES E. CLARK " " 1921 

ROBERT D. DONALDSON " 1920 

Assessors. 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE Term expires 1922 

CHARLES S. WHEELER M " 1921 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN " " 1920 

Treasurer. 
C. LEE TODD. 

Collector of Taxes. 
THOMAS L. GILES. 

Auditor. 
JAMES W. LENNON. 



Constables. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER 
GEORGE E. CUNNINGHAM 



Commissioners of Trust Funds. 

DONALD GORDON , Term expires 1920 

CHARLES S. SMITH " "1921 

C. LEE TODD " " 1922 



Tree Warden. 
JOHN J. KELLIHER 

Trustees for Bern is Fund for Free Public Lectures. 

DONALD GORDON Term expires 1920 

CHARLES S. SMITH " " 1921 

C. LEE TODD " " 1922 

Trustees of Grammar School Fund. 

CHARLES S. WHEELER. CONRAD P. HATHEWAY. 

JOHN T. CLARK. 



Trustees of Lincoln Library. 

GEORGE G. TARBELL. JOHN F. FARRAR. 

C. LEE TODD. 
CHARLES S. SMITH, Chairman of Selectmen, ex-officio. 
ANTHONY J. DOHERTY, Chairman School Committee, ex-officio. 



Registrars. 

CHARLES S. SMITH. ROBERT D. DONALDSON. 

JOHN F. FARRAR. WILLIAM C. PEtRCE 



5 



School Committee. 



AMOS R. LITTLE Term expires 1920 

CONRAD P. HATHEWAY " " 1921 

ANTHONY J. DOHERTY " " 1922 



Water Commissioners. 

SUMNER SMITH Term expires 1920 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN " " 1921 

JOHN J. KELLIHER " " 1922 



Field Drivers. 
WARREN A. SHERMAN. PHILLIPS BRADLEY 

Fence Viewers. 
JOHN F. FARRAR. WILLIAM H. SHERMAN 

Surveyor of Lumber. 
SAMUEL FARRAR. 

Measurers of Wood and Bark. 
SAMUEL FARRAR. JOHN F. FARRAR 



Cemetery Commissioners. 

FRITZ CUNNERT Term expires 1920 

CHARLES S. SMITH " " 1921 

EDWARD F. FLINT " " 1922 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 



Proceedings of a Town Meeting held 
March 3, 1919 

WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln in said 
County : 

GREETING : 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you 
are hereby required to notify the legal voters of said Town of 
Lincoln, qualified to vote at Town Meeting for the transaction 
of Town affairs, to meet in the Town Hall, in said Lincoln on 
Monday, the third day of March next at 11.30 o'clock, A. M., 
by posting a copy of this Warrant, by you attested, in each of 
the Post Offices and in some other public place in said Town, 
seven days at least before the third day of March, then and 
there to act on the following Articles: 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot will be open at 
12 o'clock noon and may be closed at 6.30 o'clock P. M. 

ARTICLE 1. To choose a Moderator. 

ART. 2. To bring in their votes for the following 
Town Officers, and any other officers required by law to be 



8 

elected by ballot or otherwise, also any committees, com- 
missioners and trustees. 

One Town Clerk for one year. 

One member of the Board of Selectmen for three years. 

One member of the Board of Assessors for three years. 

One member of the Board of Health for three years. 

One Treasurer for one year. 

One Collector for one year. 

One Auditor for one year. 

Two Constables for one year. 

One Tree Warden for one year. 

One member of the Trust Fund Commissioners for three 
years. One member of the Trust Fund Commissioners for 
one year. 

One member of Trustees for Free Public Lectures for 
three years. One member of Trustees for Free Public Lec- 
tures for one year. 

One member of the School Committee for three years. 

One member of the Board of Water Commissioners for 
three years. 

One member of the Board of Cemetery Commissioners 
for three years. 

Also to vote "Yes" or "No" upon the following ques- 
tion : "Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in this Town?" 

ART. 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committee, Commissioners and Trustees. 



ART. 4. To appropriate money for necessary and ex- 
pedient purposes of the Town and enact anything in rela- 
tion to the same. 

ART. 5. To determine the manner of collecting taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

ART. 6. To determine the compensation of the Col- 
lector of Taxes for the ensuing year. 

ART. 7. To see if the Town will authorize the Treas- 
urer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow during 
the municipal year, beginning January 1, 1919,1 in antici- 
pation of the collection of taxes for the said year, such 
sums of money as may be necessary for the current ex- 
penses of the Town, but not exceeding the total tax levy 
for the said year, giving the notes of the Town in payment 
therefor payable in one year from the date thereof. All 
debts incurred under authority of this vote shall be paid 
from taxes of the present municipal year. 

ART. 8. To see if the Town will choose a Committee 
on Claims under the provisions of Section 3, Article 6 of 
the By-Laws. 

ART. 9. To see if the Town will appropriate any money 
for the Middlesex County Farm Bureau. 



HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

And make due return of this Warrant with your doings 
thereon to the Town Clerk at or before the time for the meet- 
ing aforesaid. 



10 

Given under our hands this twenty-first day of February, in 
the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and nineteen. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



11 

The following return is on the back of the Warrant : 

Lincoln, February 24, 1919. 

I have served this Warrant by posting an attested copy in 
each of the Post Offices and in the Railroad Station seven days 
before the date of said meeting. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Constable of Lincoln. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant the meeting was called to 
order by the Town Clerk at 11.45 A. M., who read the War- 
rant. 

ARTICLE 1. Voted to choose Sumner Smith, Moderator 
of this meeting. (Sworn.) 

The Moderator then appointed the following: Herbert G. 
Farrar, Robert R. Hunter, Tellers. (Sworn.) Thomas J. 
Dee, Ballot Clerk. (Sworn.) 

The polls were opened at 12 o'clock noon. Voted: That 
when this meeting adjourn, it do so to meet again in Bemis 
Hall Saturday, March 8 at 1 o'clock P. M. 

Voted to adjourn at 6.45 P. M. 

ART. 2. The result of the Ballot was as follows: 

Town Clerk.— 

William C. Peirce (Sworn) 93 votes 

Blanks 20 " 



12 



Selectman, for three years. — 

John F. Farrar (Sworn) 
Blanks 



93 votes 
20 " 



Assessor, for three years 

William C. Peirce (Sworn) 
Blanks 



90 votes 
23 " 



Treasurer. — 

C. Lee Todd (Sworn) 
Blanks 



91 votes 
22 " 



Collector of Taxes. — 

Thomas S. Giles (Sworn) 
Blanks 



98 votes 
15 " 



Auditor. — 

James W. Lennon (Sworn) 
Blanks 



94 votes 
19 " 



Constables. — 




George E. Cunningham (Sworn) 


90 votes 


Blanks 


23 " 


John J. Kelliher 


92 votes 


Blanks 


21 " 


School Committee, for three years. — 




Anthony J. Doherty (Sworn) 


83 votes 


Roderick B. Laird 


22 " 


Blanks 


8 " 



13 



Water Commissioner, for three years. — 

John J. Kelliher (Sworn) 86 votes 

Joseph S. Hart 1 " 

Blanks 26 " 



Board of Health, for three years. — 

Martin M. Welch 
Blanks 



94 votes 
19 " 



Tree Warden. — 

John J. Kelliher 
Blanks 



93 votes 
20 " 



Cemetery Commissioner, for three years. — 



Edward F. Flint 
Blanks 



88 votes 

25 " 



Commissioner of Trust Funds. — 

C. Lee Todd for three years 

Blanks 

Donald Gordon for one year 

Blanks 



89 votes 
24 " 
89 votes 
24 " 



Trustee for Bemis Fund for Free Public Lectures. — 



C. Lee Todd for three years 

Blanks 

Donald Gordon for one year 

Blanks 



87 votes 
26 " 
87 " 

26 " 



14 



Question. — 



Shall License be granted for the sale of Intoxicating Liquors 
in this Town': 

Yes 19 votes 

Xo 61 " 

Blanks 33 a 

The meeting was called to order the following Saturday at 
2 P. M. by the Moderator, who read the result of the ballot. 
The following officers were then chosen : 

Field Drivers. — 

Warren A. Sherman, Phillips Bradley. 

Fence Viewers. — 

John F. Farrar (Sworn.) 
William H. Sherman (Sworn.) 

Surveyor of Lumber. — 

Samuel Farrar 

Measurers of Wood and Bark. — 

Samuel Farrar. 

John F. Farrar (Sworn.) 

Trustees of Grammar School Fund. — 

Conrad P. Hatheway. 
John T. Clark. 

ARTICLE 3. Voted: That all the Reports of Town Of- 
ficers as printed in the Town Report be accepted. 



15 



ART. 4. The following appropriations were voted : 

For Schools $14,000.00 

For Transportation of Children 4,000.00 

For Support of Poor 500.00 

For Highways and Bridges 10,000.00 

Voted, That a sum not exceeding $9,000.00 be appropriated, 
to be expended under the direction of the Selectmen in con- 
junction with the State Highway Commission and the County 
Commissioners in rebuilding a portion of the South Great 
Road, so-called. The appropriation taken from money now in 
the Treasury. 

For Library. The Dog tax and $ 500.00 

For Interest 500.00 

For Cemeteries. (Taken from Cemetery fund) .... 500.00 

For Board of Health 200.00 

For Tree Warden 500 00 

For Suppression of Gypsy and Brown Tail Moths. . 1,500.00 

For Miscellaneous Expenses 6,000.00 

For Hydrants and other Water Service 2,400.00 

For Waltham Hospital Free Bed 250.00 

For Street Lamps 1,600.00 

For Fire Department 200.00 

For Payment of Schoolhouse Bonds 1,814.34 

For Interest on Schoolhouse Bonds 660.00 

For Payment of Water Bonds (from Water Works 

Income) 1,000.00 

Voted, That the sum of $4,787.51 be transferred from the 
Water Works Treasury during the ensuing year, if such sum 
is available in the Water Works Treasury. 

ART. 5. Voted that the taxes be collected in the same 
manner as last year. 



16 

ART. 6. Voted that the compensation of the collector of 
taxes be 1$4%. 



ART. 7. Voted that the Town authorize the Treasurer with 
the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow during the Municipal 
year beginning January 1, 1919, in anticipation of the collec- 
tion of taxes for the said year, such sums of money as may 
be necessary for the current expenses of the Town, but not 
exceeding the total tax levy for the said year, giving the 
notes of the Town in payment thereof, payable in one year 
from the date thereof, all debts incurred under authority of 
this vote shall be paid from taxes of the present municipal 
year. 

ART. 8. Voted to pass over the article. 

ART. 9. Voted to appropriate $25.00 for the Middlesex 
County Farm Bureau. 

Voted to adjourn this meeting. 

Attest : 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 

Town Clerk. 



March 11, 1919. 

Herbert G. Farrar was this day sworn as Special Police 
for the remainder of the year by 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 

Town Clerk. 



17 

March 14, 1919. 

Isaac Langille was this day sworn as Special Police for the 
remainder of the year by 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 

Town Clerk. 



March 14, 1919. 

Lorenzo E. Brooks was this day sworn as Special Police 
for the remainder of the year by 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 

Town Clerk. 



March 14, 1919. 

John J. Kelliher was this day appointed Sealer of Weights 
and Measures, also appointed Forest Warden. 

Attest : 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 

Town Clerk. 



March 18, 1919. 

Winslow A. Eaton was this day sworn as Special Police 
for the remainder of the year by 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 

Town Clerk. 



June 3, 1919. 

John Campbell, Supt. Special Service Department, was ap- 
pointed Special Police for the Town of Lincoln, by The Edi- 



18 



son Electric Illuminating Company. Sworn by Edward S. 
Mansfield, Notary Public. 

Attest : 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 

Town Clerk. 

August 13, 1919. 

John F. Farrar was this day sworn as weigher of stone and 
other commodities for the South Great Road construction. 

Attest : 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 

Town Clerk 

August 13, 1919. 

Thomas L. Giles was this day sworn as Deputy to John F. 
Farrar as weigher of stone and other commodities. 

Attest : 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 

Town Clerk. 



19 



Proceedings of the State Election, held 
November 4, 1919 

WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To any Constable in the Town of Lincoln in said County. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you 
are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
the Town of Lincoln duly qualified to vote in the election 
of State and County Officers to assemble in Town Hall on 
Tuesday, November 4th, at seven o'clock in the forenoon to 
give in their votes for the following officers, viz. : Governor, 
Lieutenant Governor, Secretary, Treasurer, Auditor, Attorney 
General, Councillor (one), Senator (from the fifth Middlesex 
District) (one), Representative in General Court (from the 
Thirteenth Middlesex District), County Commissioner, Asso- 
ciate County Commissioner (two), District Attorney, and any 
other officer required by law to be chosen in the month of 
November of the current year. 

All officers enumerated above are to be designated and voted 
for on one ballot, and also the following questions : 

QUESTIONS. 

Acceptance of the rearrangement of the Constitution of the 
Commonwealth submitted by the Constitutional Convention. 



20 



Acceptance of Chapter 311, General acts of 1919 entitled, 
"An Act relative to the establishment and maintenance of con- 
tinuation schools and courses of instruction for employed 
minors." 

Acceptance of Chapter 116, General Acts of 1919, entitled, 
"An Act to authorize savings banks and institutions for sav- 
ings, and trust companies having savings departments, to place 
deposits on interest monthly." (Referendum.) 

Question of Public Policy under Chapter 819 Acts of 1913, 
"Shall the Senator from this District be instructed to vote for 
legislation to regulate and license the manufacture and sale 
of beverages containing not over four per cent of alcohol by 
weight and to define same to be non-intoxicating." 

The polls to be opened at seven o'clock A. M. and may be 
closed at seven o'clock P. M. or earlier, and you are directed 
to serve this Warrant by posting an attested copy thereof in 
each of the Post Offices and in one of the Churches or in some 
other public place, seven days at least before the day appointed 
for said meeting and to make reasonable return thereof with 
your doings thereon to the Town Clerk. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

Given under our hands this twenty-seventh day of October 
in the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred nineteen. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON. 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

The return on the back of the Warrant is as follows: 

Lincoln, October 28, 1919. 
I have served this Warrant by posting an attested copy in 



21 



each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad Station seven 
days before said meeting. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Constable. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant the meeting was called to 
order at seven o'clock A. M. by the Chairman of the Board 
of Selectmen, who read the Warrant and administered the 
oath to George G. Tarbell and Thomas J. Dee as Ballot Clerks, 
and to Thomas L. Giles as Teller. The polls were then de- 
clared open. At 6.30 o'clock P. M. the polls were closed by 
a unanimous vote. There were 224 ballots cast and the total 
agreed with the counter on the ballot box and with the check 
list used by the Teller. After counting, the ballots were given 
to the Town Clerk. The result of the ballot was read in open 
meeting after which the meeting was dissolved. The result of 
the ballot was as follows: 



FOR GOVERNOR.— 

Calvin Coolidge, of Northampton (R.) 
Richard H. Long, of Framingham (D.) 



181 votes 
43 " 



FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR.— 

Channing H. Cox, of Boston (R.) 
John F. J. Herbert, of Worcester (D.) 
Blanks 



169 votes 
43 " 
12 " 



FOR SECRETARY.— 

Albert P. Langtry, of Springfield (R.) 165 vo 

Charles H. McGlue, of Lynn (D.) 38 

Harry W. Bowman, of Boston (P.) 2 

James Hayes of Plymouth (S.L.) 2 

Herbert H. Thompson, of Haverhill (S.) 1 

Blanks 16 



es 



22 



FOR TREASURER.— 

Fred J. Burrell of Medford (R.) 
Chandler M. Wood, of Winchester (D.) 
Charles D. Fletcher, of Somerville (P.) 
Blanks 



135 votes 
69 " 

2 " 
18 " 



FOR AUDITOR.— 



Alonzo B. Cook, of Boston (R.) 
Arthur J. B. Cartier, of Fall River (D.) 
Henry J. D. Small, of Boston (P.) 
Oscar Kinsalas, of Springfield (S.L.) 
Walter P. J. Skahan, of Springfield (S.) 
Blanks 



155 votes 
45 

3 

2 

2 
17 



FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL.— 

J. Weston Allen, of Newton (R.) 163 votes 

Joseph A. Conry of Boston (D.) 34 " 

Conrad W. Crooker, of Melrose (P.I.P.) 6 " 

Morris I. Becker, of Chelsea (S.L.) 1 vote 

William R. Henry, of Lynn (S.) 1 " 

Blanks 19 " 



FOR COUNCILLOR, (Sixth District).— 

James G. Harris, of Medford (R.) 
Blanks 



165 votes 
59 " 



FOR SENATOR, (Fifth Middlesex District).— 

John M. Gibbs of Waltham (R.) 166 votes 

Warren L. Bishop of Wayland (D.) 41 " 

Blanks 17 " 



23 

FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 
(Thirteenth Middlesex District). — 

Benjamin Loring Young, of Weston (R.) 157 votes 

John C. Dolan, of Concord (D.) 57 " 

Blanks 10 " 

FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, (Middlesex County).— 

Erson B. Barlow, of Lowell (R.) 153 votes 

Charles J. Barton, of Melrose (D.) 36 " 

Blanks 35 " 

FOR ASSOCIATE COMMISSIONER, (Middlesex 
County). — 

Frederic P. Barnes, of Newton (R.) 145 votes 

H. Harding Hale, of Hudson (R.) 90 " 

FOR DISTRICT ATTORNEY, (Northern District).— 

Nathan A. Tufts, of Waltham (R.) 168 votes 

William E. Russell of Cambridge (D.) 45 " 

Blanks 11 " 



Questions. — 

Shall the arrangement of the Constitution of the Common- 
wealth submitted by the Constitutional Convention be approved 
or ratified : 

Yes— 75 
No— 31 
Blanks— 118 

"Shall an act passed by the General Court in the year nine- 
teen hundred nineteen entitled "An Act relative to the establish- 



24 

ment and maintenance of continuation schools and courses of 
instruction for employed minors" be accepted : 

Yes— 93 
No— 22 
Blanks— 109 

Shall Chapter 116 General acts of 1919 approved by the 
General Court without division, which provides that deposits in 
savings banks and savings departments of trust companies may 
be placed on interest once a month and not oftener; that divi- 
dends on such deposits may be declared semi-annually and not 
oftener, and that interest shall not be paid on any such deposit 
withdrawn between dividend days, be approved. 

Yes— 78 
No— 39 
Blanks— 107 

"Shall the Senator from this district be instructed to vote 
for legislation to regulate and license the manufacture and sale 
of beverages containing not over four per cent of alcohol by 
weight and to define same to be non-intoxicating : 

Yes— 109 
No— 70 
Blanks— 45 
Attest : 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 

Tozmi Clerk. 



At a meeting of the Town Clerks of the Thirteenth Repre- 
sentative District of Middlesex County held at Concord, No- 



25 



vember 14, 1919, the vote for Representative in the General 
Court was determined as follows: 



John C. Dolan, of Concord 366 57 38 162 26 649 

Benjamin Loring Young, of Weston 669 157 177 247 383 1633 
Blank 38 10 6 14 15 83 

Total 1073 224 221 423 424 2365 

Two certificates of the election of Benjamin Loring Young 
of Weston were prepared and signed by the Clerks for trans- 
mission to the Secretary of the Commonwealth and to the 
Representative elect. 

William D. Cross, Town Clerk of Concord. 
William C. Peirce, Town Clerk of Lincoln. 
Frank T. Gerry, Town Clerk of Sudbury. 
Warren L. Bishop, Town Clerk of Wayland. 
Brenton H. Dickson, Jr., town Clerk of Weston. 

Attest : 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 

Town Clerk. 



26 



JURY LIST FOR 1919 
As prepared by the Selectmen of Lincoln 



Name 

Adams, John 
Bamforth, Fred J. D. 
Brooks, Lorenzo E. 
Calkins, T. Alonzo 
Crook, Russel G. 
Farnsworth, Charles P. 
Farrar, Herbert W. 
Farrar, John F. 
Flint, Ephraim B. 
Gordon, Donald 
Foreman, Charles F. 
Harding, William A. 
Johnson, Walter W. 
Laird, Ludwig V. A. 
Lennon, James W. 
Martin, Owen E. 
McAskill, Dan A. 
McHugh, John E. 
Neville James M. 
Welch, Martin M. 
Wheeler, Abner S. 



P. 0. Address 


Occupation 


So. Lincoln 






Business Man 


Lincoln 






Farmer 


Concord, R. 


F. 


D. 


Farmer 


So. Lincoln 






Farmer 


So. Lincoln 






Sculptor 


So. Lincoln 






Farmer 


So. Lincoln 






Farmer 


So. Lincoln 






Farmer 


Lincoln 






Farmer 


So. Lincoln 






Lawyer 


So. Lincoln 






Carpenter 


So. Lincoln 






Carpenter 


Lincoln 






Farmer 


Lincoln 






Clerk- 


So. Lincoln 






Clerk 


So. Lincoln 






Farmer 


So. Lincoln 






Blacksmith 


Concord, R. 


F.D. 


Farmer 


Concord, R. 


F. 


D. 


Farmer 


So. Lincoln 






Farmer 


So. Lincoln 






Clerk 



CHARLES S. SMITH 
JOHN F. FARRAR 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



27 



There have been recorded during the year ending December 
31, 1919, 7 Marriages, 11 Births, 9 Deaths. 









Births Registered 


Date 


of 


Birth 


Name of Child 


Name of Parents 


Nov. 


19, 


1902 


Margaret Elizabeth Frazier 


Jeoffrey D. and Margaret Delory Frazier 


Jan. 


3, 


1918 


Manley Edward Boyce 


Manley B. and Alice M. Corvette Boyce 


Jan. 


22, 


1919 


Olive Foreman 


Charles F. and Annie Simond Foreman 


Jan. 


30, 


1919 


Frederick Gibson 


John and Ethel Haines Gibson 


April 


4, 


1919 


Henry Allen Butcher 


Henry A. and Bessie Holman Butcher 


May- 


26, 


1919 


Frank Ciraso 


Michael and Amelia Marganella Ciraso 


May 


31, 


1919 


Louizi Nicassio Soutedicola 


Nicassio and Froncisco Diodata 
Soutedicola 


Aug. 


1, 


1919 


Madeline Coan 


Thomas F. and Anna A. Crowley Coan 


Aug. 


23, 


1919 


Evelyn Louise Graham 


James W. and Harriet E. Tuttle Graham 


Dec. 


14, 


1919 


Warren Eugene Sherman 


Warren A. and Margaret D. Nutting 
Sherman 


Dec. 


18. 


1919 


Still-born Newman 


Alva and Clara E. Eaton Newman 



EXTRACT FROM THE REVISED LAWS Chap. 29 
AS AMENDED BY CHAP. 280, ACTS OF 1912 

Sect. 1. Physicians and midwives shall, within forty- 
eight hours after the birth of every child in cases of which 
they were in charge, mail or deliver to the clerk or registrar of 
the city or town in which the birth occurred a notice stating 
the date and place of the birth, giving the street number, if 
any, the number of the ward in a city and the family name. 
Failure to mail or deliver the said notice shall be punished by 
a fine not exceeding twenty-five dollars for each offence. The 
notice required by this Section need not be given if the notice 
required by the following Section is given within forty-eight 
hours after the birth occurs. 

Sect. 6. Parents, within forty days after the birth of a 
child, and every householder, within forty days after the birth 
of a child in his house, shall cause notice thereof to be given 



28 



to the clerk of the City or Town, in which such child is born. 

Sect. 8. A parent, keeper, superintendent or other person 
who is required by Section 6 to give or cause to be given 
notice of a birth or death, who neglects so to do for ten days 
after the time limited therefor, shall forfeit not more than five 
dollars for such offence. 



Marriages Registered 



Date of Marriage 


Marriage Registered 


Residence 


May 


28, 


1919 


{ 


Edward Stanley Hobbs, Jr. 
Laura Ann Burgess 


Weston 
Lincoln 


June 


18, 


1919 


i 


Francis Patrick Reynolds, Jr. 
Margaret Ann McHugh 


Lexington 
Lincoln 


Aug. 


3, 


1919 


s 
\ 


George Uberto Browning 
Isabelle Frances Smith 


Lincoln 
Cambridge 


Sept. 


16, 


1919 


{ 


Ralph H. Goodno 
Edna E. Warde 


Lincoln 
Hyde Park 


Oct. 


5, 


1919 


f 


John Joseph Connair 
Margaret Josephine Casey 


Lincoln 
Waltham 


Oct. 


8, 


1919 


{ 


Edward Francis Gilbert 
Annie Josephine O'Connel 


Lincoln 
Lincoln 


Dec. 


3, 


1919 


{ 


George Wallace Brooks 
Margaret Pauline McDonagh 


Lincoln 
Concord 



29 
Deaths Registered 













Age 




Date c 


Name 
















Y. 


M. 


D. 


Jan. 


9, 


1919 


Mary Adeline Lahey 


60 


4 


13 


Feb. 


3, 


1919 


James Reginald Keirstead 


46 


7 


13 


Feb. 


9, 


1919 


Florence L. Dalby 


62 


4 


9 


Feb. 


21. 


1919 


Hannah Maguire 


69 


9 


26 


April 


15, 


1919 


John Elliot Bryant 


65 


5 


7 


Sept. 


s, 


1919 


Mason Parker Hunter 


50 


11 


26 


Nov. 


7, 


1919 


Eleanor Goodwin Snelling 


42 


4 


14 


Dec. 


3, 


1919 


John Catonia 


1 


5 


9 


Dec. 


18, 


1919 


Still-born Newman 












30 



REPORT OF THE SELECTMEN 



The Selectmen present the following report for the fiscal 
year ending December 31st, 1919: 

The Board was organized by the choice of Charles S. Smith, 
Chairman, and R. D. Donaldson, Secretary. 

Appointments 

The following appointments have been made during the 
year: 

Sealer of Weights and Measures, John J. Kelliher. 

Special Police, Herbert G. Farrar, Isaac Langille, Lorenzo 
E. Brooks, Winslow A. Eaton and John Campbell. 

Forest Warden, John J. Kelliher. 

Weigher of Stone and other Commodities for South Great 
Road construction, John F. Farrar, and Deputy to John F. 
Farrar, Thomas L. Giles. 

Weigher of Coal, Hay and Grain and other Commodities, 
Elmer A. Rollins. 

Inspector of Animals, Martin M. Welch. 

Janitor of Public Buildings and Caretaker of Public Grounds, 
Edward Bannon. 

For the purpose of preserving as well as possible the record 

of the Lincoln men in the various forms of service in the late 

War, what is believed to be a complete list is found on another 

page of this report. 

* * * 

On May 3rd, 1919, the Town had formal exercises in con- 
nection with the Welcome Home Day. A notice sent to all 
of our citizens was as follows: 



31 



The Town of Lincoln will, on the afternoon of May 3rd, 
extend formal welcome to the Lincoln men who have been 
in the Service. The general program for the afternoon will 
be as follows: 

1 o'clock — Parade from the Railroad Station to the Town 

Hall. 

2 o'clock — Exercises in the Town Hall with Gen. Edwards 

as the principal speaker. After the exercises in 
the Hall there will be a ball game, with a band 
concert, on the school house grounds. 

6 o'clock — Banquet in the Hall at which the men and im- 
mediate members of their families will be guests 
of the Town. 

8 o'clock — Dancing in the Hall with full orchestra. 

The Committee desires that all citizens of the Town should 
join enthusiastically in this welcome. 

For the Committee. 



And there is printed herewith a complete program of the 
exercises : 



32 



THE TOWN OF LINCOLN WELCOMES 

HER MEN RETURNING FROM 

THE WORLD WAR 



May the Third, Nineteen Hundred and Nineteen 



33 



HONOR ROLL 



Benner, Thomas E/ 
Bamforth, Charles s 
Bamforth, Ralph y 
Blodgett, Dr. Stephen H/ 
Boyce, Edward Fi 
Boyce, W. James 
Bradley, Phillips ' 
Briggs, Richard, Jr/ 
Brooks, George \\ . 
Browning, George C> 
Burgess, Aubrey W.' 
Coan, Martin ' 
Cobb, Veranus * 
Connair, John }.' 
Crowell, Wendell D. 

*Cunnert, Charles/ 
Danner, John < 
Davis, Edward Russell' 
Delory, James ' 
Doten, Wallace V. 
Dougherty, Matthew F/ 
1-11 dredge, Arthur S., Jr/ 
Farnsworth, Murray/ 
Farquhar, Robert ' 
Foster, Percival H.» 

♦Giles, John F. 
( Hies, Thomas T. y 
Goodno, Ralph Hv 
Hart, Dr. Joseph S/ 
Higginson, A. Henry , 



Hilliard, William My 
Hutton, Hubert Y/ 
Jensen, Alexander 
Kenna, John F* 
Lahay, John B,, 
Loring, Dr. Robert G v 
Lunt, Byron * 
*Marston, Wilder E. 
Martin, Thomas Br 
Moynihan, Jeremiah J.- 
Pope, Reginald - 
Rider, Harry^ 
Rocks, Charles L.' 
Rocks, Frederick A.' 
Rooney, Martin ']* 
Robus. Wiliam Of 
Ryan, Edward H. ' 
Ryan, James T. ' 
Russell, George H/ 
Sargent, Francis B, 
Seeckts, Albert ' 
Shea, James J.' 
Snelling, Harry Courtne/ 
Snelling, Howard 
Snelling, Samuel W> 
Tarbell, George G/ 
Weir, Robert J. W., Jr^ 
Wheeler, Ruth Alden/ 
Wetherbee, Charles E/ 



34 
EXERCISES IN THE TOWN HALL 

SONG America 

OPENING REMARKS 

By the Chairman of Committee of Welcome 
Mr. Charles S. Smith 

INVOCATION— Rev. Edward E. Bradley 

SONG "To Thee, O Country" 

SOLO "When the Boys Come Home" 

F. J. Kidder 

ADDRESS — Major-General Clarence R. Edwards 

SONG "Battle Hymn of the Republic" 

ADDRESS — Brig. -General John H. Sherburne 

SONG "Ring Out. Sweet Bells of Peace" 

PRESENTATION OF SERVICE MEDALS 

STAR SPANGLED BANNER 

BANQUET— Six O'Clock (Admission only by ticket) 

DANCING— Eight O'Clock (Admission only by ticket) 

Miss Dorothy Parker, Pianist 

Mr. Albert P. Briggs, Director 

COMMITTEE 

Charles S. Smith Thomas W. Codman 

John F. Farrar Lorenzo E. Brooks 

Robert D. Donaldson John J. Kelliher 

C. Lee Todd Edward E. Bradley 

Henry E. Warner Arthur S. Eldridge 

Donald Gordon Charles L. De Normandie 



35 



The following table gives the appropriations made by the 
Town during the year 1919 and the appropriations recom- 
mended by the Board to be made at the next Annual Meeting: 







The Selectmen 


• 




recommend the 

following: 
appropriations 


Appropriations 


for the 




for 1919 


ensuing year 


For Schools, $14,000.00 


$15,000.00 


Transportation for children, 


4,000.00 


5,000.00 


Support of Poor, 


500.00 


500.00 


Highways and Bridges, 


10,000.00 


12,000.00 


Library, Dog Tax, 


500.00 


700.00 


South Great Road (taken from 






money in treasury) 


9,000.00 




Cemeteries (from Cemetery Fund) 


500.00 


500.00 


Board of Health, 


200.00 


200.00 


Tree Warden, 


500.00 


500.00 


Suppression of Gypsy and Brown 






Tail Moths, 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 


Miscellaneous Expenses, 


6,000.00 


6,000.00 


Hydrants and other Water Service, 


2,400.00 


2,400.00 


Waltham Hospital Free Bed, 


250.00 


300.00 


Street Lamps, 


1,600.00 


1,800.00 


Fire Department, 


200.00 


200.00 


Payment of Schoolhouse Bonds, 


1,814.34 


.... 


Interest on Schoolhouse Bonds, 


660.00 




Payment of Water Bonds (to be 






taken from Water Works 






Income) 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


Water Works Sinking Fund (to 






be taken from Water Works 






Income) 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 



36 

Of the $9,000 recommended as an appropriation for the 
South Great Road last year, it later developed that the State 
and County were only to put in $7,500 each, therefore the 
Town's contribution, which was to be the same, was reduced 
to $7,500. Of this amount the Town had paid up to the first 
of the year upwards of $17,000 and received from the State 
and County $11,000. The work contracted for and com- 
pleted amounts to about $20,000, so that the net expenditure 
of the Town on account of the new construction of this road 
during the year 1919 will amount to about $6,667.00. 

It is expected that the State and County will be willing to 
continue the new construction of this road on the same basis 
as during the last year, and the Selectmen recommend that an 
appropriation of at least $7,500 be made available for the 
Selectmen to use in conjunction with the State and County 
during the coming year. 

On account of the increased cost of labor and materials the 
Highway Department has exceeded considerably the appropria- 
tion made. If the appropriation made had been the same as 
had been made in previous years, the net excess over the 
appropriation would have been very small. In other words, 
the total expenditures by this Department have been about 
$ 15,500 and the Department has earned about $3,200, which 
leaves a net expenditure of about $12,300. 

Finances 

The bonded debt incurred in connection with the new 
schoolhouse in 1908 of $55,000 has been entirely liquidated 
and no appropriation will be necessary this year either for the 
payment of bonds or for the interest on the same. 

The Sinking Fund Commissioners have in their hands 
$16,994.94 which will be used by them to purchase the remain- 
ing $15,000 outstanding bonds, and the income from this fund 
will more than pay the current coupons on said bonds. It has 



37 



not been possible for the Commissioners to purchase these 
bonds, the owners desiring to keep them. 

Otherwise, the financial condition of the Town as of January 
1st, 1920, is as follows: 

The outstanding bonded indebtedness on account of the 
Water Works is, as reported by the Treasurer, $66,000. The 
sinking fund, with which to retire the bonds at maturity, 
amounts to $26,800, leaving a net indebtedness of $39,200. 
There is in the Water Works treasury $2,093.37 and uncol- 
lected water rates of $4,679.42, making the total available 
cash for the Water Works treasury $6,772.79. 

The Treasurer reports cash in the General Treasury of 
$10,321.60; the uncollected taxes amount to $2,790.94, or a 
total of available cash of $13,112.54. 

There is also available cash in the treasury of the Cemetery 
Department $945.31. 

The surplus in the hands of the Sinking Fund Commis- 
sioners, with which to retire the bonds and interest, will 
amount to about $1,500, making a total of available cash in 
all departments of about $22,330.64. 

Fire Department 

The Fire Department has been conducted as heretofore. 
For a more detailed report, reference is made to the Report 
of the Fire Engineer. 

For the other Departments, the reports made by the heads 
of the departments and printed herein furnishes the Town all 
the information with respect to the department. 

The Act passed by the Legislature last year with respect to 
the distribution of the Income Tax has affected the Town of 
Lincoln unfavorably during the last year and will affect the 
Town more unfavorably from year to year. The Act as 
passed distributes the proceeds of the Income Tax among the 



38 

cities and towns of the State pro rata with the assessments of 
the State taxes. The basis for assessment of the State tax 
was also .changed so that for a time the Town of Lincoln's 
finances will gain on account of the passage of these Acts, but 
ultimately, if conditions otherwise remain the same, the Town 
will lose a large percentage of the income formerly received, 
first, on account of the assessment on intangibles by the Town 
and, second, on account of the distribution originally made 
of the Income Tax by the State. 

We recommend that the Town practise, as it has heretofore, 
a wise economy in the appropriations to be made. 

CHARLES S. SMITH 
JOHN F. FARRAR 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON 



39 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



Following is an account of the money paid by the Treasurer 
on the Selectmen's approval. 

JAMES W. LENNON, 

Auditor. 



40 



SCHOOLS 



Payments 

Town Treasurer, Teachers' Salary $7,045.80 

National Express Co., Express 15.29 

Boston & Maine R. R., Freight 2.12 

Boston & Maine R. R., Student tickets 619.41 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Telephone Service 62.29 

Mass. Teachers' Deduction Association 287.20 

Thomas J. Dee, Carrying Children 865.00 

Andrew J. Dougherty, Carrying Children 360.00 

Martin Sherman, Carrying Children 100.00 

David Farquhar, Carrying Children 35.00 

Doherty Garage, Carrying Children 2,820.50 

Waltham Coal Company, Coal 668.10 

New England Coal Company, Coal 12.70 

Charles S. Smith, Coal 289.95 

H. A. Wood, M. D., Professional Services 200.00 

Hattie B. Heath, Taking Census 12.00 

Edison Light Company, Light 11.06 

Josephine Doherty, Teaching 15.00 

Mrs. John Peters, Labor in School 3.00 

Doherty Garage, Use of Auto Truck 37.01 

Town of Concord, Tuition 2,401.00 

M. Steinart & Sons Co., Piano 135.00 

Citizens Printing Co., Printing 12.65 

Edward Farrar, Cord Wood 11.00 

Current Events, 55 Copies 16.50 

George E. Cunningham, Labor 15.00 

Robert D. Donaldson, Labor & Supplies 611.86 



41 

Isaac H. MacRae, Labor and Supplies 12.60 

Langille Bros., Labor and Supplies 48.00 

Leroy Bazley, Electrical Work 43.79 

Kenny Bros. & Wolkins, Supplies 44879 

Jordan Marsh & Co., Supplies 183.37 

Houghton Mifflin Co., Supplies 47.16 

Chandler & Barber Co., Supplies 60.53 

Ginn & Company, Supplies 211.38 

Library Bureau, Supplies 113.54 

Macmillan Co., Supplies 57.58 

Milton Bradley Co., Supplies 16.87 

Edward Babb & Co., Supplies 129.19 

Silver Burdett Co., Supplies 8.90 

Rollins Bros., Supplies 88.44 

John Wood, Supplies 55.68 

Hopkins & Holden, Supplies 10.00 

H. L. Dalman, Supplies 12.07 

Allen Bros., Supplies 5.05 

Henry A. Grimwood, Supplies 1.62 

George Johnson, Supplies 25.00 

Wright & Ditson, Supplies 22.80 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies 3.33 

T. J. McEvoy, Supplies 8.16 

Benj. H. Sanborn Co., Supplies 31.15 

A. N. Palmer Co., Supplies 47.25 

University of Chicago Press, Supplies 3.84 

D. C. Heath & Co., Supplies 18.46 

American Book Co., Supplies 12.04 

C. H. Morss, Supplies 28.45 

Daniels Printing Co., Supplies 28.45 

J. L. Hammett Co., Supplies 30.01 

David Farquhar, Supplies 55.60 

Maud Burns, Supplies 1.50 

Milwaukee Dustless Brush Co., Supplies , 4.75 

McGraw Hillbrook Co., Supplies 3.19 

Scott Foreman Co., Supplies 17.62 

J. C. Winston Co., Supplies 40.46 



42 

Palmer & Parker, Supplies 27.60 

C. E. Merrill, Supplies 41.01 

Henry C. Stokes Co., Supplies 18.00 

World Book Co., Supplies 2.46 

G. H. Goldwaite & Co., Supplies 25.00 

L. E. Knott Apparatus Co., Supplies 97.21 

H. A. Wood, M. D., Supplies 1.59 

Cambridge Botanical Supply Co., Supplies 29.07 

Mass. Reformatory, Supplies 40.75 

Edward Bannon, Janitorship 500.00 

Total $19,383.75 



43 



HIGHWAY 



Payments 

William H. Sherman, Superintendent of Streets $1,421.48 

Timothy Ahearn, Labor 1,018.50 

Joseph Mahan, Labor 978.50 

William Ryan, Labor 990.00 

Timothy J. Crowley, Labor 963.00 

John W. Rooney, Jr., Labor 453.80 

Patrick Craven, Labor 470.00 

William Burgess, Labor 10.50 

Andrew Doherty, Labor 9.00 

J. Moynihan, Labor 34.50 

Frank H. Cunningham, Labor 139.25 

Charles P. Farnsworth, Care of horses 278.00 

Brown Grain Company, Grain 1,248.21 

Daniel McAskell, Shoeing and Repairing 162.85 

Burgess Garage, Shoeing and Repairing 366.75 

H. L. Alderman, M. D., Professional Services 6.00 

Barrett Mfg. Company, Tarvia and Oil 3,748.79 

W. H. Stearns, Repairs 160.16 

John F. Farrar, Horse 200.00 

Boston & Maine R. R., Freight 133.11 

Joseph S. Hart, M. D., Standing Grass 125.00 

Joseph S. Hart, M. D., Rent of Barn 125.00 

American Express Co., Express .79 

Arlington Heights Auto Co., Trucking 54.20 

Doherty Garage, Trucking .50 

Robert D. Donaldson, Labor and Supplies 112.97 

Winchester Crushed Stone Co., Crushed Stone 191.93 

Mass. Broken Stone Co., Crushed Stone 881.98 



44 

Marcy Coal Company, Coal 67.15 

Peter Perry, Supplies 33.70 

Eagle Oil & Supply Co., Supplies 15.53 

Henry A. Grimwood, Supplies 5.10 

Waltham Coal Company, Supplies 5.50 

New England Machine Co., Supplies 3.55 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies 12.05 

Dyer Supply Co., Supplies 5.50 

Harold Bond & Co., Supplies 41.76 

B. B. McKim Co., Supplies 6.16 

Standard Oil Co., Supplies 4.15 

The Texas Company, Supplies 898.78 

J. A. Higgins, Supplies 12.40 

Annie Morrissey, Sand and Gravel 56.30 

George Hill, Gravel 6.40 

John Fleming, Stone 16.56 

Daniel Holman, Stone 6.05 

L. E. Brooks, Stone 30.25 

Herbert W. Farrar, Sand 123.25 

Charles Ellms, Sand 18.00 

Byron Bradstreet, Sand 9.00 



Total $15,661.91 

HIGHWAY SPECIAL 

Payments 

John A. Gaffney, Labor on Highway Construction, $15,192.26 
John F. Farrar, Services as Weigher 161.50 

Robert D. Donaldson, Labor and Supplies 56.81 

$15,410.57 



45 



WATER. 



Payments 

fames T. Laird, Superintendent and Engineer $1,144.00 

James T. Laird. Use of Auto Truck $12572 

James T. Laird, Collecting Water Rates $175.00 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Service of Telephone 17.13 
Edison Electric IW'g. Co., Service of Power and Light 1,579.13 

American R. R. Ex. Co., Express 12.32 

William C. Peirce, Rent of Land 5.00 

Sumner Smith, Services as Water Commissioner 75.00 
William H. Sherman, Services as Water Commissioner 75.00 

John J. Kelliher, Services as Water Commissioner 75.00 

Fred A. Houdlett Co., Supplies 2,191.57 

Eagle Oil & Supply Co., Supplies 31.55 

Davis Farnum Mfg. Co., Supplies 47.25 

Union Water Meter Co., Supplies 80.79 

Hartley Bishop Co., Supplies 6.00 

RoHins Bros., Supplies 5.36 

Builders Iron Foundry Co., Supplies 22.35 

Chadwick Boston Lead Co., Supplies 142.63 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies 3.85 

Walworth Mfg. Co., Supplies 61.84 

American Gauge & Valve Co., Supplies 3.84 

Edison Mfg. Co., Supplies 3.45 

Rumsey Pump Co., Supplies 36.15 

Chapman Valve Co., Supplies 104.69 

National Meter Co., Supplies 15.54 

Eddy Valve Co., Supplies - 141.25 

Burgess Garage, Repairs 7.50 



46 

Joseph S. Hart, M. D., Services as Water Commis- 
sioner, 1917-1918 150.00 
Louis E. Laird, Clerical Work 35.00 
Ralph Goo.dno, Clerical Work 35.00 
Highway Department, Labor 839.00 
Langille Bros., Labor .70 
Robert D. Donaldson, Labor 206.32 
Isaac H. McRae, Labor 196.13 
Daniel J. Libby, Labor . 14.50 
Thomas F. Berin, Labor 242.00 
John F. Farrar, Labor 25.50 
Fritz Cunnert, Labor 2.00 
James Corrigan. Labor 9.00 
Contona Monilla. Labor 144.55 
F. J. D. Bamforth, Labor 6.00 
Sinking Fund Commissioners, Sinking Fund 1500.00 
William Sherman, Cash paid for Supplies 1.61 
Doherty Garage, Trucking freight 1.00 
F. H. Cunningham, Labor and Supplies 97.50 
Sumner Smith, Cash paid for supplies 150.75 
First National Bank, Payment, $2,500 Bonds 1000.00 
Commonwealth of Mass. Reg. Coupons — due Mar. 1 52.50 
Commonwealth of Mass. Reg. Coupons — due Sept. 1 52.50 
Commonwealth of Mass. Reg. Coupons — due Dec. 1 175.00 
Commonwealth of Mass. Coupons — due Dec. 1 175.00 
First National Bank, Coupons, due Mar. 1st 705.00 
First National Bank, Coupons due May 1st 87.50 
First National Bank, Coupons due June 1st 402.50 
First National Bank, Coupons, due Sept. 1st 705.00 
First National Bank, Coupons due Nov. 1st 87.50 

Total $13,340.51 



47 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Payments 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Service of telephone 

Edward Bannon, Janitorship of Public Buildings 

Edison Electric lll'g. Co., Light for Town Hall 

Edison Electric lll'g. Co., Light for Arch 

Edison Electric lll'g. Co., Broken Lamps 

George E. Cunningham, Services as Constable, 1918 

John F. Farrar, Services as Special Police 

Waltham Publishing Co., Printing 

Daniels Printing Co., Printing 

National Expre» Co., Express 

Charles S. Smith. Coal 

Isaac Langille, Special Police 

William C. Peirce, Auto Truck, May 30th 

William Costello, Mowing lawns 

William C. Robus, Labor on Arch 

Charles E. Woodhull, Tuning Piano and Repairs 

William C. Peirce, Services as Assessor 

William H. Sherman, Services as Assessor 

William C. Peirce. Services as Clerk, Registrar, etc., 

John F. Farrar, Services as Selectman, Registrar 

and Overseer 
Robert D. Donaldson, Services as Selectman, Reg- 
istrar and Overseer 
Charles S. Smith, Services as Selectman, Registrar 

and Overseer 
C. Lee Todd, Services as Treasurer 
C. Lee Todd, Cash paid for Postage, etc. 



148.86 


,008.26 


111.45 


38.48 


.60 


25.00 


10.00 


7.75 


494.53 


2.38 


382.15 


17.00 


5.00 


10.00 


1.50 


14.50 


100.00 


50.00 


182.85 


200.00 


200.00 


200.00 


300.00 


16.00 



48 

Martin M. Welch, Inspecting animals 70.75 

Martin M. Welch, Inspecting meat 30.00 

Herbert G. Farrar, Services as Special Police 15.00 

Thomas L. .Giles, Collecting Taxes, 1917 27.56 

Thomas L. Giles, Collecting Taxes, 1918 400.00 

Waltham Watch Co. Band, Music 43.60 

Waltham Watch Co., Orchestra 124.75 

H. J. Hardy, Banquet 345.75 

Middlesex County Bureau, Appropriation 25.00 

The Shepard Store, Repairing Curtain 12.70 

State of Mass. Registering Town Note 2.00 

Doherty Garage, Supplies 150.37 

Boston Woven Hose Co., Supplies 351.90 

Fire Engine Co., Supplies 31.50 

Thomas Groom Co., Supplies 4.12 

American La Franc Co., Supplies 1.10 

Rollins Bros., Supplies 27.94 

P. B. Murphy, Supplies 2.75 

Hobbs & Warren, Supplies 5.62 

E. & F. King Co., Supplies 13.00 

Harding Uniform Regalia Co., Supplies 115.51 

Horace Partridge Co., Supplies 8.40 

Robert Miller & Co., Supplies 94.85 

William F. Allen Co., Supplies 3.50 

Dennison Mfg. Co., Supplies 12.60 

Boston Badge Co., Supplies 119.00 

Thomas J. Dee, Services at Primaries and Elections 13.00 
Herbert G. Farrar, Services at Primaries and Election 5.00 

Robert B. Hunter, Services at Primaries and Election 5.00 

George E. Cunningham, Services at Election 5.00 

George G. Tarbell, Services at Elections 8.00 

Thomas L. Giles. Services at Elections 8.00 

Leroy E. Basley, Labor and Supplies 70.50 

Emery, Howard & Co., Insurance on Town Property 1488.24 

Fritz Cunnert, Sharpening lawn mowers 4.50 

Edward Bannon, Labor 6.50 

Isaac N. MacRae, Labor 141.37 



49 

George C. Cunningham, Sawing wood 7.50 

C. S. Smith, Cash paid out for Supplies 39.97 

James W. Lennon, Auditor 125.00 

J. E. Cunnert, Fighting Fires 2.20 

C. F. Cunnert, Fighting Fires 1.80 

Howard Bamforth, Fighting Fires 3.00 

W'endall Crowell, Fighting Fires 2.50 

Abner Wheeler, Fighting Fires 2.00 

Mrs. Siefert, Fighting Fires 2.50 

L. E. Brooks, Fighting Fires 13.00 

Joseph Eaton, Fighting Fires 5.40 

Edgar Browning, Fighting Fires 6.00 

A. Anderson, Fighting Fires 2.00 

Edward Graf, Fighting Fires 2.00 

William Robus, Fighting Fires 2.80 

Fritz Cunnert, Fighting Fires 1.40 

J. J. Moynihan, Fighting Fires 4.50 

I. N. MacRae, Care of Hose and Fighting Fires 66.63 

T. J. Dee, Care of Hose-house and Fighting Fires 38.85 
Herbert G. Farrar. Care of Hose-house and Fighting 

Fires 61.00 

Total $7,710.74 



50 



MOTH 



Payments 

John J. Kelleher, Superintendent Labor on Moths $1,200.00 

J. J. Moynihan, Labor 585.88 

William Costello, Labor ■ 593.50 

Fritz Cunnert, Labor 33.00 

William Bowles, Labor 60.00 

Charles Butcher, Labor 18.00 

Ralph Goodno, Labor 15.00 

Edward Gilbert, Labor 51.00 

John J. Connair, Labor 357.50 

Fritz Cunnert, Use of Truck 7.00 

Doherty Garage, Use of Truck 15.00 

M. Conners, Use of Horse 10.00 

Charles Butcher, Use of Horse 12.00 

Standard Oil Co., Supplies 103.31 

Burgess Garage, Supplies 1.75 

Frost Insecticide Co., Supplies 44.69 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies .60 

W. & L. E. Gurley. Supplies 8.70 

Rollins Bros., Supplies 1.02 

New Eng. Tel & Tel. Co., Services 3.21 

Highway Department Labor of Men and Teams 273.75 

Langille Bros., Labor and Repairs , 3.03 

Boston & Maine R. R. Freight 1.09 

American R. R. Ex. Co., Express 1.93 

Highway Department, Storing Sprayer 25.00 

Total $3,425.96 



51 



CEMETERY 



Payments 

Robert D. Donaldson, Labor 5.80 

Fritz Cunnert, Labor 199.30 

Ralph Goodno, Labor 53.75 

Water Commissioners. Water Service 20.00 

Highway Department, Labor of Men and Teams 37.00 

Total $315.85 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Payments 



Doherty Garage, Labor and Supplies 34.63 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies 17.33 

Total $51.96 



LINCOLN LIBRARY 



Payments 



John F. Farrar, Treas., Appropriation $500.00 

John F. Farrar, Treas., Dog Tax Returned 293.55 

Total $793.55 



52 



INTEREST ON SCHOOL HOUSE BONDS 



Payments 



First National Bank, Interest on School House Bonds 360.00 
First National Bank, Coupons due July 1st 300.00 



Total $660.00 



PAYMENT OF SCHOOL HOUSE BONDS 



Payment 
First National Bank, Payment of School-house Bonds, $3000.00 



PAYMENT OF BORROWED MONEY 



Payment 
First National Bank, Payment of Note $20,000.00 



INTEREST ACCOUNT ON BORROWED MONEY 



Payment 
First National Bank, Discount on $20,000.00 $410.67 



53 



STREET LIGHTS 



Payments 



Edison Electric lll'g Co., Service of Light for Dec. $158.06 

Edison Electric lll'g Co., Service of Light for Jan. 148.26 

Edison Electric lll'g Co., Service of Light for Feb. 147.40 

Edison Electric lll'g Co., Service of Light for March 134.47 

Edison Electric lll'g Co., Service of Light for April 142.62 

Edison Electric lll'g Co., Service of Light for May 136.27 

Edison Electric lll'g Co., Service of Light for June 129.15 

Edison Electric lll'g Co., Service of Light for July 122.96 

Edison Electric lll'g Co., Service of Light for August 123.55 

Edison Electric lll'g Co., Service of Light for Sept. 126.87 

Edison Electric lll'g Co., Service of Light for Oct. 135.70 

Edison Electric lll'g Co., Service of Light for Nov. 144.45 

Edison Electric lll'g Co., Service of Light for Dec. 156.56 
Edison Electric lll'g Co., Service of Light for Aug. 1917, 132.62 



Total $1,938.94 



SUPPORT OF POOR AND MOTHERS' AID 



Payments 



State Board of Charity, Care of Andrew Kilfoye $365.00 

Joseph Dee, Jr., Burial of James Keristead 59.50 

Agnes Gilbert, Mothers' Aid for 1919 180.00 

Total $604.50 



54 
HYDRANTS AND OTHER WATER SERVICES 



Payments 



Water Commissioners, Watering Troughs $572.00 

Water Commissioners, 124 Hydrants to June, 1920 1,860.00 
Water Commissioners, Water Service, Town Hall 50.00 



$2,482.00 



WALTHAM HOSPITAL 



Payment 
Waltham Hospital, Appropriation $250.00 



55 



RECAPITULATION 



Payments 



Schools 


$19,383.75 


Highways 


15,661.91 


Highway Special 


15,410.57 


Water 


13,340.51 


Payment of Borrowed Money 


20,000.00 


Miscellaneous 


7,710.74 


Moths 


3,425.96 


Payment of Schoolhouse Bonds 


3,000.00 


Hydrants and Other Water Service 


2,482.00 


Street Lights 


1,938.94 


Interest 


410.67 


Interest on Schoolhouse Bonds 


660.00 


Lincoln Library 


793.55 


Mothers' Aid and Support of Poor 


604.50 


Waltham Hospital 


250.00 


Fire Department 


51.96 


Cemetery 


315.85 


Total 


$105,440.91 



56 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



Jan. 23, 1920. 

To the Board of Health: — 

I herewith submit the following report for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1919: — 

Number of herds of cows 78 

Number of Milch cow > 501 

Number of young stock 183 

Number of bulls 32 

Number of pigs 739 

Number of sheep 77 

Number of cows quarantined 5 

Number of cows taken for tuberculosis 5 

Number of dogs quarantined 3 

Number of dogs affected with rabies 1 

MARTIN M. WELCH, 

Inspector of Animals. 



57 



REPORT OF ANIMALS SLAUGHTERED 



Jan. 23, 1920. 
To the Board of Health : — 

I herewith submit the following report of animals 
slaughtered for the year ending December 31, 1919. 

Pigs 234 

Calves 15 

Cattle 19 

Pigs condemned 2 

Cattle condemned 3 

Calves condemned 

MARTIN M. WELCH, 

Member of the Board of Health. 



58 



Dogs Licensed in 1919 



There have been 152 Dogs Licenses issued as follows: 111 
Males, 30 Females, 9 Spayed Females, 2 Kennels for which 
the sum of $459.60 has been paid to the County Treasurer. 

There have been 35 Resident Hunters' Licenses issued for 
which $29.75 has been paid to the Commissioners on Fisheries 
and Game. 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 

Town Clerk. 



59 



REPORT OF FIRE ENGINEERS 



To the Board of Selectmen : — 

The Board of Fire Engineers herewith submit their twelfth 
annual report, ending December 31, 1919. 

Force 

Thirty-three men belong to the Department : one chief, six 
engineers, and twenty-six call men. There are three organized 
companies. 

Apparatus 

The apparatus belonging to the Department is as follows: 
Two wagons, one reel, one combination truck, twenty-five ex- 
tinguishers, three ladders, hose, axes, and plaster hooks. 

Location of Apparatus 

No. 2 — Combination truck at Doherty's Garage, So. Lincoln. 
No. 3 — Hose house, John Dee Farm, Virginia Road, North 
Lincoln. 

Fires 

During the past year the truck has been called out as follows : 
Two chimney, seven grass, fifteen wood, one auto, two houses 
ai a loss of $5,000, and two calls to Wayland wood fires. 

ISAAC N. MacRAE, Chief, 
THOMAS DEE, 
HERBERT FARRAR, 
H. S. COUSINS, 
J. J. KELIHER, 
ANDREW DOUGHERTY, 
MATHEW H. DOHERTY. 



60 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF 
STREETS 



To the Board of Selectmen : — 

I herewith submit the following report for the year ending 
December 31, 1919: 

The roads are in a little better condition than last year owing 
to the use of more tarvia and oil, which has kept them from 
being worn out. The most of the work this year has been 
patching up the old roads, putting on tarvia and oil, and doing 
some graveling where the gravel roads were getting worn out. 
I built about 800 ft. of crushed stone road, bound with tarvia, 
in the north part of the town, also some gravel road near Mr. 
Story's and in the north part. We have done a lot of work 
for the Water and Moth Departments, and some private work, 
all of which helps to keep the Highway Department within 
the appropriation. Owing to the high cost of labor and of all 
kinds of material during the year I have not been able to keep 
the expenditures down to what the town voted last Spring. 

Following is a partial sketch of what the men and teams 
have been doing through the year : 

JANUARY 

During the first part of the month the teams hauled stone 
and gravel most of the time, and the men worked on water 
leaks and chopping wood. 

FEBRUARY 

The men worked for the Water Department part of the time, 
and cutting ice and chopping wood. The teams hauled stone 
from the crusher, and did what snow work there was to do. 



61 

MARCH 

The first of this month we worked at the crusher crushing 
stone, and for the Water Department part of the time. The 
last part of the month we scraped part of the roads and filled 
the ruts with crushed stone. 



APRIL 

We crushed some stone, finished filling the ruts and scraping 
off the roads. Also patched the roads and teamed sand and 
gravel for covering tarvia, and put tarvia on some roads. 



MAY 

The first part of the month we worked for the Water Depart- 
ment on Sandy Pond road putting in new pipe. The last part 
of the month we put out sand and tarvia, and did some work 
for the Moth Department. 

JUNE 

The first part of this month the men and teams worked on 
the Moth work, patched the roads, put out sand and tarvia, 
and did some having the last part of the month. 

JULY 

We patched the roads, teamed sand, put out tarvia and oil, 
and teamed coal. 

AUGUST 

We finished putting out the tarvia and oil, patched the roads, 
and did some gravel work near Mr. Story's. One team worked 
on the State Road in the south part of the town. 



62 



SEPTEMBER 

One team worked on the State Road. The men and two 
teams worked teaming gravel near Kidder Bros, and Mr. 
Story's, and teaming coal. 

OCTOBER 

One team worked on the State Road part of the time, and the 
men and teams worked teaming sand and gravel, and for the 
Water Department. 

NOVEMBER 

During this month we worked in the north part of the town 
building some crushed stone road on the Virginia Road, and 
some gravel road between Mr. Cunnert's corner and the State 
Road. 

DECEMBER 

The most part of this month was spent teaming sand and 
gravel for next season's work. 

Material Used: 

About 1200 loads of sand and gravel, and about 800 tons 
of crushed stone beside what we crushed at the crusher ; 16,000 
gallons of road oil, 5,000 gallons Tarvia, K. P. for patching, 
and 25,000 gallons Tarvia B for laying the dust and preserving 
the roads. All the stone was used for filling ruts and patching 
the roads, except what was used to build 800 feet oa Virginia 
Road. 

Payments : 

Hay, grain, straw, etc., approximately $1,375.00 

Stone, gravel and sand, " 1,190.00 

Tarvia and oil, " 4,650.00 

Supplies * 450.00 

Rent 150.00 



63 

Freight and express " 200.00 

Shoeing and repairs, " 710.00 
Superintendent's Salary 

Labor, snow work, etc., " 6,775.00 



Total $15,500.00 

Less sum total which has been paid into Town 
Treasury, and balance still due for labor, 
material, etc., approximately 3,225.00 



Amount expended for the year, $12,275.00 

CONDITION OF THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

The department is in about the same condition as last year 
with the exception of one horse which was exchanged for a 
new one, and one horse having died last month we shall have 
to purchase one in the Spring. 

I recommend a liberal appropriation for the highways for 
the next year, as there are several roads that are getting beyond 
patching and must be resurfaced very soon. As shown by 
this report, it has cost nearly $3,000 for material for patching 
this year, besides the labor. 

The guide boards are in about the same condition as last 
year. I have put up some new boards this year, and am having 
some more repainted to put up later. 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



64 



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65 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF 
SINKING AND TRUST FUNDS 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 
TOWN OF LINCOLN 

1919 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $838.66 

Coupons, Town of Lincoln 3js 105.00 

Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s (Serial) 100.00 

Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s, 1936 560.00 

$500 Town of Lincoln Serial 4s due 500.00 

Cash, C. L. Todd, Treasurer 1,500.00 

Coupons, U. S. Liberty 4is, 1928 127.50 

Coupons, U. S. Liberty 4is, 1938 62.18 

Interest on Deposit 17.17 

Dec. 31. Balance 1,410.50 



$5,221.01 



1919 Cr. 

Jan. 16. Fourth payment, $1,500 U. S. Liberty 4*s, 1938.... $300.00 

Jan. 30. Fifth payment, $1,500 U. S. Liberty 4is, 1938 461.04 

Nov. 3. $5,000 Town of Lincoln 3h, (1934) 4,459.97 



$5,221.01 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

$2,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, Serial Bonds, due 1912 to 1923. 
$14,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due September, 1936. 

$3,000 Town of Lincoln JJs, due September, 1932. 

$3,000 U. S. Liberty 4is of 1928. 

$1,500 U. S. Liberty 4£s of 1938. 
$5,000 Town of Lincoln 3is, due November, 1934. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



66 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

FUND FOR PURCHASE OF SCHOOLHOUSE BONDS 

1919 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $16,185.66 

Interest 809.28 

$16,994.94 

1919 Cr. 

Dec. 31. Cash on deposit $16,994.94 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



67 - 

TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

GEORGE G. TARBELL LEGACY TO THE LINCOLN 

LIBRARY 

1919 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $2970 

Dividends, West End St. Ry. Co. common 3.50 

Dividends, American Tel. & Tel. Co 32.00 

Dividends, West End St. Ry. Co. preferred 52.00 

Dividends, Boston & Lowell R. R. Co 64.00 

Coupons, United Fruit 4is, 1923 22.50 

Interest on deposit 5.78 



$209.48 



1919 Cr. 

Dec. 31. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treas. Lincoln Library $179.78 

Balance on deposit, principal account 29.70 



$209.48 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

8 shares Boston & Lowell Railroad Co. 
13 shares West End Street Railway Co. preferred. 
8 shares New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 
4 shares American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
I shares West End Street Railway Co. common. 
$500 United Fruit Co. 4|s, due 1923. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



68 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

GEORGE RUSSELL LEGACY TO THE LINCOLN 
LIBRARY 

1919 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $33.02 

Dividends, Fitchburg Railroad Co 35.00 

Interest 2.68 

$70.70 



1919 Cr. 

Dec. 31. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treas. Lincoln Library $37.68 

Balance on deposit, principal account 33.02 



$70.?v. 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

7 shares Fitchburg Railroad Co. preferred. 

2 shares New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



69 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

JULIA A. BEMIS FUND FOR BENEFIT OF LINCOLN 

LIBRARY 

1919 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $35.34 

Dividends, West End St., Railway Co. common... 7.00 

Coupons, U. S. Rubber 5s 50.00 

Interest 3.52 



$95.86 



1919 Cr. 



Dec. 31. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treas. Lincoln Library $60.52 

Balance on deposit, principal account 35.34 

$95.86 

The Fund is invested as follows : 

2 shares West End Street Railway Company common. 
$1,000 United States Rubber 5s, 1947. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



70 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY TO THE LINCOLN 
LIBRARY 

1919 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $18.33 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 5s 50.00 

Dividends, West End St. Ry. Co. common 3.50 

Interest 1.52 



$73.35 



1919 Cr. 



Dec. 31. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treas. Lincoln Library $55.02 

Balance, principal account 18.33 



$73.35 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

1 share West End Street Railway common. 
$1,000 American Tel. & Tel. Co. 5s, 1946. 



Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



71 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR LINCOLN LIBRARY 

1919 Dr. 

Jan. 1. ' Balance $81.87 

Dividends, West End St. Ry. common 17.50 

Coupons, U. S. Rubber Co. 5s 100.00 

Interest 7.72 

$207.09 

1919 Cr. 

Dec. 31. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treas. Lincoln Library $125.22 

Balance on deposit, principal account 81.87 



$207.09 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

5 shares West End Street Railway common. 
$2,000 United States Rubber 5s, due 1947. 



Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



72 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR SILENT POOR 

1919 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $640.42 

Coupons, United States Rubber 5s, 1947 100.00 

Interest 34.73 

$775.15 

1919 Cr. 

June 15. Cash, Selectmen's order $37.50 

Balance on deposit, income account $576.49 

Balance on deposit, principal account 161.16 

$775.15 

The Fund is invested as follows : 

$2,000 United States Rubber 5s, 1947. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



73 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account zvith 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR TOWN HEARSE 

1919 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $75.31 

. Dividend, Pennsylvania Railroad Co 45.00 

Interest on deposit 4.78 

$125.09 

1919 Cr. 

Dec. 31. Balance on deposit $125.09 

The Fund is invested as follows : 

15 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



74 



THE BEMIS LECTURE FUND TRUSTEES 

/* Account with 

THE BEMIS LECTURE FUND 

1919 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance $1,00071 

Dividends, Pennsylvania R. R. Co 150.00 

Boston & Providence R. R 100.00 

Fitchburg Railroad pfd 50.00 

Old Colony Railroad 70.00 

Boston & Albany Railroad 114.50 

American Tel. & Tel. Co 480.00 

Boston & Lowell R. R 240.00 

West End St. Ry. pfd 40.00 

Great Northern Ry. pfd 175.00 

Coupons. American Tel. & Tel. Co. 5s 50.00 

" Southern Railway Co. 4s 120.00 

New York Railways 4s 20.00 

U. S. Rubber 5s 50.00 

10 shs. Boston & Maine R. R 310.85 

10 shs. New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R. 305.85 

Interest on deposit 22.47 



$3,299.38 



1919 Cr. 

Tan. 3. Doherty Garage $ 8.00 

Mar. 20. W. F. Allen & Co., Printing and Postals 8.25 

Mar. 14. Mme. Leveroni & The Hoffman Quartette, Concert 299.40 

Mar. 27. P. A. Carter, Postage and Labor 4.72 

Mar. 27. Capt. R. R. Belknap, U. S. X., Lecture 70.70 

Apr. 4. W. F. Allen & Co., Programs 9.00 

Apr. 7. The Floyds. Magio 59.52 

Apr. 16. Six shs. Boston & Albany R. R. Co. stock 822.75 

Apr. 18. American String Quartette & S. Adamsky, Concert 141.60 



Apr. 


25. 


May 


5. 


May 


9. 


Nov. 


14. 


Nov. 


20. 


Nov. 


25. 


Nov. 


26. 


Dec. 


1. 


Dec. 


4. 


Dec. 


10. 


Dec. 


11. 


Dec. 


19. 


Dec. 


23. 


Dec. 


31 



75 



Horace Taylor, Lecture 32.20 

Dr. Russell H. Conwell, Lecture 150.00 

Doherty Garage 20.00 

Maria Conde, and The Smalley Trio, Concert 172.59 

Alice Capen, Travel Talk 50.00 

W. F. Allen & Co., Postals and Printing 4.25 

John Kendrick Bangs, Lecture 100.00 

P. A. Carter, Postage and Labor 2.89 

The Pilgrim Male Quartette and R. Knapp Breed, 

Reader 80.50 

Doherty Garage 7.00 

William R. Balch, Lecture 76.10 

Henry Warren Poor, Lecture 50.00 

The Players, Programs (two sets) 15.25 

Balance 1,114.66 



$3,299.38 



The Fund of $30,000 is invested as follows : 

50 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 

30 " Boston & Lowell Railroad Co. 

10 " Boston & Providence Railroad Co. 

16 " Boston & Albany Railroad Co. 

10 " Fitchburg Railroad Co. 

10 " Old Colony Railroad Co. 

10 " West End St. Railway pfd. 

60 " American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 

50 " Northern Idaho & Montana Power Co. pfd. 

25 " Great Northern Railroad Co. pfd. 

$4,000 New York Railways Co. 5s, 1942. 

$1,000 New York Railways Co. 4s, 1942. 

$3,000 Southern Railway Co. 4s, 1956. 

$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 5s, 1946. 

$1,000 United States Rubber Co. 5s, 1947. 



Respectfully submitted, 

C. LEE TODD, Treasurer. 



76 



REPORT OF CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



The usual work of keeping the cemeteries in an attractive 
condition has been done during the year. The hedge at the 
three cornered cemetery has been trimmed and is in excellent 
condition. Most of the work has been done by one of the 
Commissioners, Mr. Fritz Cunnert. 

There were laid out five additional lots on part of the land 
occupied by the original cemetery and other good lots can be 
laid out in this cemetery which will be available. 

There is $945.31 in the Cemetery treasury, and the Commis- 
sioners recommend that $500 of this sum be appropriated for 
expenses at the cemeteries during the coming year. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
FRITZ CUNNERT, 
EDWARD F. FLINT, 
Cemetery Commissioners. 



77 



THE TOWN TREASURER 

In Account with 

THE LINCOLN CEMETERY COMMISSION 

1919 Dr. 

Jan. 1. Balance on hand $80.78 

Dividends, Sugar preferred 28.00 

Fitchburg preferred 10.00 

Union Pacific 12.00 

One-half Lot Xo. 140 10.00 

One-halfe Lot Xo. 140 10.00 

One-half Lot Xo. 140 10.00 

Lot No. 99 20.00 

Lot Xo. 266 30.00 

Interest 6.69 



$207.47 

1919 Cr. 

Dec. 31. Balance on hand $207.47 



The following is a list of securities held by the Town Treasurer : — 

Four shares American Sugar Refining Co., preferred 
Three shares Union Pacific R. R. Co., preferred 
Two shares Fitchburg R. R. preferred 

Also the following funds for the care of lots in cemetery, all of 
which are deposited in the Middlesex Institution of Savings : 

General Fund $504.89 

Orilla J. Flint Fund, $300 plus accumulated interest of $31.70. 
Samuel Hartwell Fund, $300 plus accumulated interest of $31.70. 
Annie A. Ray Fund, $300 plus accumulated interest of $31.70. 
John H. Pierce Fund, $500 plus accumulated interest of $52.57. 
Maria L. Thompson Fund, $500 plus accumulated interest of $52.85. 
George F. Harrington Fund, $100 plus accumulated interest of $9.43. 
Francis Flint Fund, $250 plus accumulated interest of $23.47. 

(Signed) C. LEE TODD, 

Town Treasurer. 



78 



REPORT OF THE COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



Tax List committed to me by the Assessors Sep- 
tember 7th, 1919 $23,621.89 

Additional Assessments 8.00 

$23,629.89 
Less Abatements 1 14.00 

Net Amount to be collected $23,515.89 

Amount collected to January 1, 1920 21,087.81 

Amount remaining to be collected Jan. 1, 1920 $2,428.08 

1919 taxes collected . $21,087.81 

1918 taxes collected 2,255.04 

1917 taxes collected 67.42 

Total taxes collected $23,410.27 

Amount paid by Collector to Town 

Treasurer $23,410.27 

Amount of 1919 taxes to be collected $2,428.08 

Amount of 1918 taxes to be collected 362.86 

Total uncollected taxes for 1918-1919 $2,790.94 

There are no uncollected taxes prior to 1918. 

THOMAS L. GILES, 

Collector. 



79 



ASSESSOR'S REPORT 



The Board of Assessors submit the following report: — 

Number of residents assessed on property 244 

" non-residents assessed on property 91 

" assessed on polls only 168 

" acres of land assessed 8,740 

" dwelling houses assessed 282^ 

" horses assessed 123 

" cows assessed 466 

" neat cattle other than cows assessed 72 

" swine assessed 216 

" sheep assessed 153 

Value of land, exclusive of buildings $598,914.00 

" buildings, exclusive of land $1,051,495.00 

" real estate 1,650,409.00 

" personal estate 268,148.00 

Total valuation $1,918,557.00 

State tax, $4,180.00 

County tax 2,147.52 

State Highway tax 1,629.98 

Special State tax 250.80 

Town Grants 44,624.34 

Overlayings 2,847.80 

Total $55,680.44 

Deduct Income tax 32,058.55 

Amount to be collected $23,621.89 

No. of Polls 322 
Rate of taxation, $12.00 per $1,000.00 



WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 
WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, 

Assessors. 



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94 



TREE WARDEN'S REPORT 



During the past year the work has been carried on as for- 
merly, creosoting Gypsy Moth nests on our roadside trees and 
trees in the Cemeteries, this work continued until the middle 
of May, when we started spraying operations. All the road- 
side trees were sprayed and about two hundred acres of wood- 
land with very good results, we also sprayed a large number of 
orchards with the small power sprayer. We were very fortu- 
nate this year in having good weather during the spraying 
season, and also in being able to obtain the help of the High- 
way Department as men and horses are hard to get at this 
season of the year when everybody is busy. The roadside 
thinning and cleaning, which consists of cutting the brush and 
removing the dangerous limbs and dead wood from trees along 
the roadsides, was done on a good many of our highways 
this year. 

The total expenditure of this department is $3,425.94 of 
which there has been returned to the Town Treasurer $1,508.66 
on account of private work, leaving a net cost of $1,917.28 to 
the Town. 

I recommend that $2,500 be appropriated for Moth and 
Tree Work. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Tree Warden. 



95 



REPORT OF BOARD OF WATER 
COMMISSIONERS 



The Water Commissioners Present herewith their annual 
report : — 

During the year 1919-20 twelve regular and two special 
meetings were held, at which all the members were present. The 
Board was organized with the choice of W. H. Sherman as 
chairman and S. Smith as secretary. 



The Water Works are not in as good a financial conditi 



ion 



as in the last few years, because the Board has bought three 
carloads (3000 feet) of six inch pipe and laid about 1500 
feet. In June, lightning struck the cement lined pipe on Sandy 
Pond Road, and damaged.it to such an extent that it was 
renewed from the hydrant at the Scully place to the foot of 
the hill at Miss Georgia Weston's. Considering that this pipe 
had been in the ground forty-four years, twenty-three of 
which it had been pumped through, some of it was in very 
good condition, but where a few lengths were good, the next 
few would be bad, so bad that there was difficulty in finding 
a sound length to calk onto. During this renewal the water 
takers along this line were shut off about two weeks, thus being- 
put to considerable inconvenience. Therefore the Board de- 
cided to replace the remainder of the old pipe on this road and 
tried to let out the work to a contractor. The pipe was bought, 
delivered and some of it distributed, but no satisfactory arrange- 
ments could be made for laying it, so that after about two hun- 
dred feet was put in by the Town, the ground froze solid and 
the pipe remains for future laying. 

Another pipe which has caused much trouble and exorbitant 
expense for its extent and duration of service, is the wooden 



96 

pipe in South Lincoln. The only so far discovered way to 
repair this pipe is to patch it, which method is difficult, par- 
ticularly in winter, uncertain and unsatisfactory. At present 
the end of this pipe is discontinued because a leak could not 
be stopped. The Board believes that the Town would gain if 
this wooden pipe were replaced, because the whole line could 
be renewed for not much more money than the cost of repair- 
ing leaks that have already occurred there, and it is probable 
that their frequency will increase. 

The electric pump has been depended upon for all the pump- 
ing, and is in good condition. If it should break down for a 
longer period than it takes the Town to drain the reservoir, 
there is a probability that the Town would be without water 
until it could be started again. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, 
SUMNER SMITH, 
J. J. KELLIHER, 

Water Commissioners of Lincoln. 



97 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS FOR YEAR 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1918 



Lincoln Water Works, Lincoln, Middlesex County, Mass. 



General Statistics 

Population by census of 1915, 1310. 

Date of construction, 1874. 

By whom owned, Town of Lincoln. 

Source of supply, Sandy Pond, Lincoln, Mass. 

Mode of supply, Pumping. 



Pumping Statistics 

Rumsey Triplex Pump, 10j/>" x 12" 25 horse-power motor. 
Power, electricity. 

Power furnished by the Edison Electric Illuminating Com- 
pany of Boston. 
Average static head against which pump works, 148.5 feet. 
Average dynamic head against which pump works, 160 feet. 
Rainfall, 40.25 inches. 



98 



Statistics Relating to Distribution System 

Mains Services 

1. Kind of pipe used, cement 12. Kind of pipe, galvanized 
lined, cast iron, wood iron and cement lined, 
stave, galvanized iron. 13 Sizes> z/ ,, tQ r 

2. Sizes, V/ 2 " to 12". H Discontinued) 2 . 

3. Extended during the 15 Number of service taps 
year, none. added during the year> 4 

4. Discontinued during the fa Number now in use> 340> 

year, none. 

17. Average length of ser- 

5. Total now in use, 26,571 y - Y2'-\- 

miles. Hydrants replaced, 

2 18. Meters now in use, 14. 

6. Number o f hydrants 
added during the year, 
none. 

7. Number o f hydrants 
(public and private) now 
in use, 125. 

8. Number of stop-gates 
added during the year, 2. 

9. Number of stop-gates 
now in use, 135. 

10. Number of blow-ofiS, 30. 

11. Range of pressure on 
mains, 40 pounds to 102 
pounds. 



99 



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100 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH FOR 
THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1919 



The town has been free from contagious diseases during the 
year with the exception of the following cases reported : 

Scarlet Fever ........ 2 

Influenza ......... 1 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARTIN M. WELCH, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 
Members of Board of Health. 



101 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 



The Trustees on the following pages submit the report of 
the Treasurer and Librarian for the year ending December 31, 
1919. 

The increased price of books and of the running expenses 
of the Library due to the generally higher cost of labor and 
materials makes necessary the request for a larger appropria- 
tion than was asked for last year. 

The Trustees ask for an appropriation of $700.00 and the 
Dog Tax. 

C. LEE TODD, 

Chairman of the Trustees. 



102 



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103 



STATISTICAL REPORT OF THE LINCOLN 

PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR THE YEAR 

ENDING JANUARY 1, 1920 

Number of volumes in Library, January 1, 1919 10,818 

Increase by purchase 171 

Increase by gift 22 

Increase by binding periodicals 11 

Number of books withdrawn 88 

Number of books rebound 67 

*Destroyed by fire 10 

Number of volumes in Library, January 1, 1920 10,924 

Total delivery of books for year 9,449 

Largest delivery in one day 151 

Smallest delivery in one day 29 

Number of books delivered, fiction 3,942 

Number of books delivered, juvenile 2,757 

Number of books delivered, non-fiction 2,750 

Number of days Library was open 103 

Gifts of books, periodicals, etc., have been received during 
the year from Mr. James E. Baker, Miss Annie Bartlett, Miss 
Carrie B. Chapin, Mrs. E. Flint, Mrs. W. Harrington, Henry 
\Y. Palmer Esq., Miss Jennie I. Peirce, Miss Bertha Scripture, 
Mrs. Charles S. Smith, Mr. J. Waldo Smith, Capt. Geo. G. 
Tarbell, Miss Georgie Weston, Mrs. C. Wilcox. 

The usual number of bulletins, reports, etc., have been re- 
ceived from various Public Libraries and other institutions. 

* Burning of house. 



104 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Accessions to the Library for 1919 

FICTION 

Altsheler, Joseph A. Masters of the Peaks: A story of 

the great North woods 937 . 24 

*Arnim, M. A., Countess, Russell. Christopher and 

Columbus 715.29 

Bassett, Sara Ware. The Harbor road 726.40 

Birmingham, G. A. The Island mystery 723.27 

Bosher, Kate Langley. His friend Miss McFarlane 926.24 

Brown, Alice. The black drop 726.39 

Canfield, Dorothy. Home fires in France 726.31 

Carlsen, C. L. Son of Pio' 925 . 36 

Clifford, Mrs. W. K. Miss Fingal 1015.27 

Connor, Ralph. Sky Pilot in No Man's land 1016.27 

Conrad, Joseph. Arrow of gold ■. 725.28 

Cooke, M. B. Cricket 726.35 

Cooper, James A. Cap'n Jonah's fortune: A tale of 

Cape Cod 1016.28 

Curtis, Mrs. J. Challenge to Adventure 917.36 

Dillon, Mary. The American 1017.27 

Dodge, Louis. A runaway woman 935 . 26 

Dunbar, Ruth. The swallow 726.37 

Farnol, Jeffrey. Our Admirable Betty 932.26 

Grey, Zane. Desert of wheat 932.27 

Hacben, Will N. Hills of refuge 937.26 

Harland, Marion. Carrington's of High Hill 726.41 

Harris, Cora and Leech, F. H. From sunup to sun- 
down 726 . 33 

Hope, Anthony. Secret of the tower 914.26 

Hughes, Rupert. Cup of fury: A novel of Cities and 

shipyards 925 . 35 

Hurst, Fannie. Humoresque: A laugh on life with a tear 

behind it 715.26 



105 



Ibanez, Vincent Blasco. Four horsemen of the Apoca- 

lpse 936.26 

Ibanez, Vincent Blasco. Shadow of the Cathedral.... 725.29 

King, Basil. City of comrades 725.30 

Laing, Janet. Before the wind 927 . 27 

Lewis, Sinclair. Free air 726 . 42 

Lincoln, Joseph C. Shavings 926.21 

MacGrath, Harold. Yellow typhoon 726.38 

Mackenzie, Compton. Sylvia Scarlett 927.26 

Marshall, Archibald. Clintons, and others 928.22 

. Richard Baldock 925.34 

Martin, Helen R. Maggie of Virginsburg 1025.30 

Merrick, Leonard. Actor-manager 914.25 

. Conrad in quest of his youth 1015.27 

. Position of Peggy Harper 917.37 

Merwin, Samuel. Passionate Pilgrim 935.28 

Norris, Kathleen. Sisters 917.35 

Ostrander, Isabel. Twenty-six clues 1015.28 

Parker, Gilbert. Wild Youth and another 725.27 

Porter, Eleanor H. Dawn 1026.29 

Prouty, Olive Higgins. Good sports 912.22 

. Star in the window 917.33 

Richards, Laura E. Daughter of Jehu 715.27 

Rinehart, Mary Roberts. Dangerous days 928.21 

. Love stories 926.25 

Snaith, J. C. The undefeated 715.28 

Terhune, Albert. Lad: A dog 935.27 

Vellotton, Benjamin. Heart of Alsace 937.25 

Waller, Mary E. Out of the silences 926.22 

Ward, Mrs. Humphrey. Elizabeth's campaign 926.23 

Wells, Carolyn. The diamond pin 726.33 

. Joan and Peter 927.25 

Weston, George. You never saw such a girl 935.29 

White, William Allen. In the heart of a fool 723.26 



BIOGRAPHY 



Adams, Henry. Education of Henry Adams: An auto- 
biography 532 . 4 

Botchkareva, Maria. Yashka: My life as peasant, offi- 
cer, and exile 646 . 8 

Davis, Arthur X. The Kaiser as I knew him 646.7 



645.18 


547.18 


646.10 


646.9 


532.5 


646.5 



106 

Grcnfell, Wilfred Thomason. A labrador doctor 646.12 

Harris, Julia Collier. Life and letters of Joel Chandler 

Harris 646.3 

Hasanovitz, Elizabeth. One of them Chapters from a 

passionate autobiography 646.6 

Hudson, W. H. 

. Far away and long ago: A history of my early 

life . 646.4 

Laughlin, Clara E. Foch the man: A life of the supreme 

Commander of the Allied Armies, with appreciation 

by Lieut. -Col. Eduoard Requin of the French High 

Commission to the United States 

Lecomtc, Georges. Georges Clemenceau: the Tiger of 

France 

Livingstone, W. P. . . 

. Christina Forsyth of Fingo-land. Story of 

the loneliest woman in Africa 

Low, A. Maurice. Woodrow Wilson: an interpretation 

Roosevelt, Theodore. Autobiography 

Ward, Mrs. Humphrey. A writer's recollections. 2 vols. 
Washburn, Charles G. Theodore Roosevelt. The logic 

of his career 645 . 17 

Wiggins, Lida Peck. Life and works of Paul Laurence 

Dunbar 645.16 

Richards, Laura E. Joan of Arc 646.11 

FOURTEEN 



HISTORY 

Emerson, Edward Waldo. Early years of the Saturday 

Club. 1855-1870 364.3 

Levine, Isaac Don. Resurrected Nations. Short his- 
tories of the peoples freed by the great war and 
statements of their National Claims 364.4 



EUROPEAN WAR AND RELATED SUBJECTS 

Aldrich, Mildred. Peak of the load: The waiting months 
on the hilltop., from the entrance of the Stars and 

Stripes to the second victory on the Marne 1522.18 

. When Johnny comes marching home 1311.12 

Anderson, Isabel (Mrs. Larz Anderson). Zigzagging.. 1522.15 



107 



Copplestone, Bennett. Silent watchers: England's Navy 

during the war; what it is, and what we owe to it.. 1522.17 
Dawson, Coningsby. Living bayonets: a record of the 

last push 1512.21 

Deland, Margaret. Small things 1522.22 

Gibbs, A. Hamilton. Gun fodder: the diary of fottr 

years of war 1331 . 27 

Huard, Frances Wilson. With those who wait 1522.19 

Husband, Joseph. A year in the Navy 1311 .9 

Morganthau, Henry. Ambassador Morganthau's story . . 1537.25 

Powell, E. Alexander. The Army behind the Army.... 1311.11 

Sibley, Frank P. With the Yankee division in France.. 1311.8 
Simonds, Frank H. History of the world war. 3 vols... 361.5 

Swan, Carroll J. My Company 1522. 16 

Whitlock, Brand. Belgium. 2 vols 1321.21 

Wile, Frederic William. Explaining the Britishers. 
Story of England's mighty effort in liberty's cause 

as told by an American 1311 . 10 



TRAVEL AND DESCRIPTION 

Hudson, W. H. Idle days in Patagonia 412.27 

MacMillan. Donald. Four years in the white North.... 422.21 

Muir, John. Steep trails 423 . 24 

O'Connor, Elizabeth P. Herself — Ireland 423.23 



RELIGION, ETHICS 

Carroll, Robert S. The soul in suffering: A practical 

application of spiritual truths 1 125 . 23 

Dresser, Horatio W. On the threshold of the spiritual 

world: A study of life and death over there 1132.11 

Lewis, Frank Grant. How the Bible grew: The story 

as told by the Book and its keepers 1125.24 

POETRY, DRAMA 

Kipling, Rudyard. Years between 1436.27 

Maeterlinck, Maurice. The betrothal: Sequel to the 
Blue Bird. A fairy play in five acts and eleven 

scenes 1436.25 

Noyes, Alfred. The new morning 1436.26 



108 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Bradish, Prudence. Mother-love in action 1522 . 25 

Burroughs, John. Field and study 1522.21 

Camp, Walter. Keeping fit all the way: how to obtain 

and maintain health, strength, and efficiency 1317.19 

Cobb, Ernest. The hen at work: A brief manual of 

home poultry culture 213.21 

Dean, Edward Owen. Opportunities in farming 213.20 

Gillinlan, Strickland. Sunshine and awkwardness 1337.28 

Morgan, A. Compiler. Selected readings: designed to 
impart to the student an appreciation of literature 

in its wider sense 1336. 27 

Paine, Albert Bigelow. Dwellers in Arcady; story of 

an abandoned farm 1336.26 

Palmer, F. E. My lady's house plants: the complete 
instructor and guide to success with flowers and 
plants in the home, and a remarkable chapter on 

the ideal stin parlor 1337.29 

Poole, Ernest. The village. Russian impressions 1317.20 

Sayre, Francis Bowes. International Administration... 1522.20 

Steiner, Edward A. Uncle Jo's Lincoln 1333.26 

Wells, Caroline. Such nonsense 1512.20 



JUVENILE 

Bailey, Carolyn Sherwin. Stories for every holiday.... 843.18 

Blanchard, Amy E. Girl Scout of Red Rose troop 845.26 

Brown, Edna A. At the Butterfly House 843.15 

Burgess, Thornton W. Adventures of Bobby Coon 848.3 

. Adventures of Bob White 813.28 

. Adventures of Jimmy Skunk 848.3 

. Adventures of. Ol' Mistah Buzzard 813.27 

. Happy Jack 845.23 

. Mother West Wind "where" stories 845.24 

Carey, A. A. Boy Scouts at sea 843.20 

Chase, Mary Ellen. Girl from the Big Horn Country.. 811.24 

Collins, A. Frederick. Boys' Airplane book ...... 1221.30 

. Handicraft for boys 1236.29 

Colum, Padriac. Boy who knew what the birds said... 1211.26 

Crump, Irving. Boys' book of firemen 834.26 

. Boys' book of policemen 834.27 

Dyer, Walter A. Pierrot, dog of Belgium 825.29 



109 



Eastman, Charles (Ohiyesa). Indian heroes and great 

chieftains 1236.28 

Every Child's Mother Goose 845.25 

Fabre, Jean Henri. Story book of science 843.24 

Forrester, I sola L. Kit of Greenacre farm 811.25 

Goday, Mercedeo. When I was a girl in Mexico 1215.30 

Gollomb, Joseph. That year at Lincoln High 1235.25 

Hagedorn, Hermann. Boy's life of Theodore Roosevelt 1237.29 

Harris, Joel Chandler. Uncle Remus returns 1233.27 

Holland, Rupert S. Lafayette, we come ! 1237 . 30 

Hunt, Clara Whitehall. Little house in the woods 1235.26 

Johnston, Annie Fellows. Little Colonel in Arizona.... 847.23 

■ — . Little Colonel at boarding school 847.22 

. Little Colonel's Knight comes riding 847.25 

. Little Colonel's maid of honor 847.24 

Lanier, Henry W. Book of bravery: Being true stories 

in an ascending scale of courage. 2 vols 1221.29 

Lee, Albert. At his country call 1237.28 

Mason, Alfred Bishop. Tom Strong, Lincoln's Scout: 
A story of the United States in the times that tried 

men's souls 834 . 28 

Mathiews, Franklin K. Boy Scouts* book of stories.... 834.24 

Morley, Margaret W'arner. Donkey John of Toy Valley 1215.29 

Perkins, Lucy Fitch. Belgian twins 843 . 22 

. French twins 843.21 

. Cornelia 825.30 

Pier, Arthur Stanwood. Hill top troop 834. 25 

Ponsonby, Arthur and Dorothea. Rebels and reformers; 

biographies for young people 845.29 

Pyle, Katharine. Counterpane fairy 1215.28 

Quirk, Leslie W. Boy Scouts of Black Eagle patrol... 845.30 
Roberts, Charles G. D. Jim. Story of a backwoods 

police dog 843.26 

. Neighbors unknown 845 . 28 

Rogers, Julia E. Earth and sky every child should 
know: easy studies of the earth and the stars for 

any time or place 845.27 

. Wild animals every child should know 825.31 

Roy, Lillian Elizabeth and Islington, M. F. Wood craft 

boys at Sunset Island 811 .22 

Saxe, Mary S. Our little Quebec cousin 811.21 

Schultz, James Willard. Lone Bull's mistake 1236.27 

Scott, E. C. Loyalty of Elizabeth Bess 1212.30 

Seaman, Augusta Huell. Melissa-over-the-fence 1233.25 



110 



Smith, Mary P. Wells. Five in a Ford 1235 . 27 

. Young Puritans in captivity 843 . 17 

Sterrett, Frances R. Rebecca's promise 81 1 . 20 

Tomlinson, Everett E. Three young Continentals 836.27 

. Scouting with General Pershing 843. 19 

Usher, Roland G. Story of the Pilgrims 848. 1 

Verne, J. The mysterious Island 811.26 

Wallace, Dillon. Bobby of the Labrador 811.23 

. Grit-a-plenty 844.24 

Warde, Margaret. Nancy Lee's namesake 843.16 

White, Eliza Orne. The blue aunt 843.23 



MAGAZINES 

Atlantic Monthly Magazine. 1917, 2 vols. 119-120. 1918, 2 vols. 

121-122. 
Harper's Monthly Magazine. 1917-1918, vols. 136-137. 
St. Nicholas. 1915-1916-1917-1918, 4 vols. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE 



SCHOOL YEAR 1919 




114 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

AXTHOXY J. DOHERTY, Chairman, Term expires 1922 
CONRAD P. HATHEWAY, Secretary, Term expires 1921 
AMOS R. LITTLE Term expires 1920 

Superintendent of Schools 
CHARLES H. MORSS 

Teachers 

Junior High Grades VII-VIII-IX 

ESTHER L. MILES 

AXXA L. STRID 

Grammar Grade VI 
MARIOX E. DAVIS 

Grammar Grades IV-V 
GLADYS E. WINNING 

Primary Grade III 
LOUISE M. DUCLOS 

Primary Grade II 
JENNIE M. WHEATON 

Primary Grade I 

hattie'b. HEATH 

Manual Training and Drawing 
ROLAND B. HOUSTON 

Saving and Cooking 
ALICE C. JUDGE 

Attendance Officer 
JOHN J. KELLIHER 

Janitor 

EDWARD BAXXOX 



115 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Winter Term begins Monday, January 5, ends Friday, 
April 9; fourteen weeks. 

Spring Term begins Monday, April 26, ends Friday, June 18; 
eight weeks. 

Fall Term begins Tuesday, September 7, ends Friday, De- 
cember 24 ; sixteen weeks. 

Winter Term begins Monday, January 3, 1921. 

Length of school year, 1919-20, thirty-eight weeks. 



116 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



During the past year several changes of more or less moment 
were decided upon, and put into effect by your Committee. 
The most important being the establishment of a ninth grade 
or "Junior High School." The experiment of retaining the 
pupils who were to go to Concord or Waltham High Schools 
for the first year of high school work was determined upon, 
and the plan from observations to date is working out very 
satisfactorily, and your Committee understands has the approval 
of the parents generally. 

To put this plan into effect it was necessary to make certain 
changes in the class arrangements. The necessary room was 
provided by moving the cooking and sewing classes to the girls' 
basement, where very convenient and well equipped cooking and 
sewing quarters are now provided. 

The room vacated, although not all that is desired, was fitted 
up for the Junior High Class. 

This change made necessary the employment of an extra 
teacher, and Miss Esther L. Miles engaged to assist in teaching 
the advanced class. 

The Committee during the year were also notified of the 
retirement of Mr. Walter F. Brackett who had been instructor 
of manual training in our schools for upward of twelve years. 
His position was filled by Roland B. Houston, # who gives in- 
struction also in drawing, giving two days each week to our 
schools. 

The above changes were the only ones made in the teaching 
staff during the year; all the other teachers having been re- 
engaged and retained. This fact to your Committee has been 



117 

one of very great relief and satisfaction, and of very material 
benefit to the schools generally, and is what your Committee has 
been striving to bring about for some time. 

As to the school finances, the Committee submit the follow- 



The Committee foresaw the general demands on the part of 
the teachers throughout the country for better salaries, and 
were satisfied that our town was no different from many others 
in this respect, and that this situation would have to be met 
and very material increases made in the teachers' salaries if 
we were to obtain and retain an efficient teaching staff. To date 
the Committee have met this situation by an increase to the 
teachers of an amount considerable above that in effect hereto- 
fore. All our grade teachers, with the exception of Miss Miles, 
are now paid a salary of $1,000 per year, Miss Miles being paid 
$1,050. At the present time our teaching force consists of seven 
grade teachers, manual training and drawing teacher, and 
teacher of sewing and cooking, also the fact must be known 
that Mr. Morss, the superintendent, is regularly engaged in 
giving instruction to the advanced grades the greater part of 
the school day. 

To make the changes necessary to provide the room for the 
ninth grade, necessitated additional expense, both for the equip- 
ment of the room and for providing a course of study, although 
this should be considered as a permanent or overhead charge. 
The same was paid from the school appropriation, and charged 
against the item for supplies in the tabulation of expenses 
annexed to this report, and accounts for the increase in the 
amount of this item over that of last year, last year's supply 
item being $693.21, a difference of over $1,800. 

Another charge against the school appropriation that hereto- 
fore was met from the general fund of the town is that of 
"Repairs on Buildings." The largeness of the amount of the 
item over that of last year is due to the fact that a bill of 
S610.38 for these repairs and changes was entered against the 



118 



school account, without the knowledge of your Committee, and 
should not have been so entered. 

Also in connection with the school finances, the Committee 
submit the following statement of amounts received, and al- 
though heretofore never having been credited to the account 
of schools, yet might properly be so considered at this time, 
town on account of expenditures in connection with the teachers' 
It will be noted that substantial amounts have been paid the 
salaries and the transportation of high school pupils. 

The above are the most prominent of the items that show 
an increase over those of last year, other than that of "Salaries," 
which has been referred to earlier in this report, and that in 
connection with the "Local Transportation" which matter your 
Committee went into and discussed at the "Annual Meeting" 
of last March, and accounted for most of the increase over 
that of last year. 

In referring to the matter of the expenditures in connection 
with the school department, the Committee would like to call 
attention to the fact that when the new school was first opened 
three rooms only were in use as class rooms for grades, while 
at this time seven rooms are in use at all times, and both base- 
ments on two days of each week. 

Including the ninth grade with a class of thirteen, there are 
at this time one hundred and eighty-eight pupils attending in- 
struction daily in this school building. 

The very important matter of more school room has been 
before your Committee for some time, and has been referred 
to by the Superintendent in his report. 

The Committee feel that the time has come when this matter 
should be brought to the attention of the town. The Center 
School is now overcrowded, and is working to a capacity far 
above that originally planned for or intended. 



119 



Additional room must be acquired and in the immediate 
future. There is available, of course, the school in the South 
part of the town, and undoubtedly this building will have to 
be opened at the beginning of the school year next September. 
Should the class be established for the special instruction of 
backward children, as is required by a law passed by the Legis- 
lature of the year 1919, then this South School will have to be 
made ready for September next. This will relieve in part the 
congestion of the Center School, but at best will be only tem- 
porary. 

The Committee would, therefore, advise that the town take 
action at its regular meeting for the year 1920 on this now 
important matter of additional school room. 

For the present year, to carry on the school work, including 
the payment of the present salaries of the teaching staff, will 
require an appropriation of twenty thousand dollars, which 
sum is hereby recommended by your committee. In this con- 
nection, it is expected that an amount equal, if not in excess of 
that received for the year 1919, will be received this year from 
the State, and other sources. 

For other school matters more in detail, you are referred to 
the report of the Superintendent, together with a summary of 
school expenses for the year, attached hereto. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ANTHONY J. DOHERTY, 
CONRAD P. HATHEWAY, 
AMOS R. LITTLE. 

School Committee. 



120 



SUMMARY OF SCHOOL EXPENSES 
FOR YEAR 1919 

Appropriation for 1919 $18,000.00 

Salaries of Superintendent and teachers 6,861.13 

High School tuition 2,401 .00 

High School transportation 688.05 

Local transportation 4,360.20 

Incidental repairs on building 666.77 

Janitor service 500.00 

Fuel 861.00 

School physician 200.00 

Supplies 2.537.01 

Miscellaneous 124.36 

Total $19,199.52 

AMOUNTS RECEIVED BY THE TOWN OX ACCOUNT 
OF SCHOOLS 

Grammar School Fund $ 83.41 

Massachusetts School Fund 1,037.07 

Educational Independent Industrial School 341.87 

Tuition of Children 181.25 

Income tax 1919 General School Fund 690.00 

Transportation High School Children 361.90 

Boston School Account 358.15 

Sloyd— Sale of Articles 12.07 

Cooking 2.45 

Total $3,068.14 



121 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

To the School Committee, Town of Lincoln : 

Gentlemen :— Notwithstanding the enforced suspension of 
the schools on account of the epidemic of influenza, in the fall 
of 1918 and again in December of the same year, we managed, 
by continuing the sessions till the end of June, to provide one 
hundred seventy-three days, or thirty- four and three-quarters 
weeks, of schooling in place of the usual term of thirty-eight 
weeks. 

While the work was necessarily much hampered by this 
irregularity, yet we were able to accomplish a fair year's work 
in all grades. There are still several classes in the upper 
grades that are not doing as advanced work as is ordinarily 
expected of these grades, a backwardness due in part to frequent 
changes of teachers and in part to the too frequent promotion 
of pupils who had not accomplished fully the work of their 
grade, but who from kindly meant sympathy, or the desire to 
please parents, were advanced with their classes, thus coming 
to the upper grades without a good foundation of primary 
work. Such pupils necessarily flounder in subjects for which 
their mental preparation has been inadequate, and they now 
constitute one of our most difficult problems. Promotions of 
this sort are unwise and unkind, for the pupil cannot receive 
much benefit from instruction which he but imperfectly com- 
prehends, and, besides the injury to himself, he is a hinderance 
to the advancement of the other members of the class who are 
able and ready to do the more advanced work. One of these 
retarded pupils requires more of the teacher's time and attention 
than any three normal pupils. At the end of the school year in 
June many of these unprepared pupils were held back. Others 
on the border line would have been benefitted by repeating the 
grade, but were sent on with the class, rather than overwhelm 



122 



any one grade by too great a number of the backward and 
retarded. 

One reason for the better work now being done is that our 
classes are in charge of the same teachers as last year, and we 
have been spared the evils that come from frequent changes 
of the teaching staff. In order to keep a permanent force we 
must add to the natural attractiveness of our town and school 
surroundings a sufficient monetary remuneration to hold 
teachers, especially when the larger places are bidding against 
each other to obtain well qualified teachers, and even then 
find it impossible to fill all their vacancies. There has never 
been a time in the whole history of public school education 
when the shortage of teachers was so great. Even with the 
recent increases of salary, we are now paying less than most 
towns within the same radius of Boston, and much less than 
is paid in the cities. * 

Another factor fully as important as that of salary militates 
against the permanency of the teaching force, and that is the 
difficulty of finding a suitable boarding place. Frequent 
changes have been necessary for many, and the outlook for 
next September is unpromising; in fact it looks as if several 
teachers would be obliged to live out of town and come every 
day by train. This misfortune will surely be upon us unless 
there are more citizens willing to receive a teacher into their 
family. This state of affairs is unfortunate, and the teachers 
cannot be blamed if they seek places where living conditions 
are made easier for them and their welcome more cordial even 
if there is no advance in salary. 

The only resignation during the year was that of Mr. Walter 
F. Brackett who for twelve years had had charge of the 
manual training work. His place was taken by Mr. R. B. 
Houston, a graduate of the Normal Art School, who devotes 
two days a week to our schools for both manual training and 
drawing and teaches the remainder of the week in Lancaster. 



123 

The decision to have the pupils of the first year courses in 
high school taught at home, instead of sending them to either 
Concord or Waltham, necessitated the employment of another 
teacher, and we engaged the services of Miss Esther L. Miles 
of Cambridge. Miss Miles is a graduate of Mt. Holyoke Col- 
lege and a teacher of experience in high school work. We 
have a class of thirteen pupils in this high school grade, five 
taking the Commercial and English courses and eight the Col- 
lege and General courses as offered by the Concord High 
School. The departmental plan has been made possible by 
organizing the seventh and eighth grades with this high school 
class into a semblance of a Junior High School, in which Miss 
Miles teaches Latin and history, Miss Strid, English and 
geography, and the Superintendent, Mathematics and Science. 
The courses of study at the Concord High School in the first 
year are as follows: 

College Preparatory Scientific Preparatory 

*English 5 *English 5 

*Latin 5 *Algebra 5 

* Algebra 5 *Latin (Optional) \ Choose 5 
Community Civics ) Choose 4 French ^ 1 5 

*E1. Science > 1 4 *Mech. Drawing Choose 

♦Drawing (Elective) 1 Community Civics I 1 4 

*E1. Science ) 4 

General Commercial 

♦English 5 Required — *English 5 

* Latin ) 5 * Penmanship and 
Community Civicsf Choose 4 Spelling ( 5 ) 3 

*E1. Math. ( 3 5 *E1. Math. 5 

*E1. Science (5) ) 4 *Electives— not less than 4 

♦Drawing (Elective) — 

17 

The studies that we offer are marked in the above outline 
with an asterisk. On the successful completion of these, pupils 



124 

should be well prepared to enter the second year classes of 
any high school. Our teaching force is not large enough to 
offer the courses in Civics and French. If it becomes possible 
to add an extra- teacher to our force to take care of the backward 
and subnormal children, of which we have a goodly percentage, 
we may be able, by a rearrangement of classes, to offer French 
to those desiring it. 

During the summer vacation the domestic science equipment 
was removed from its former place on the second floor to the 
girls' basement, where a very good laboratory for this depart- 
ment has been made. The room also serves the purpose of a 
science laboratory for the high school class when not in use 
by the cooking classes. 

With the opening of the former domestic science room as 
a class room for the high school grade, we have seven class 
rooms in use, live of which are of a single grade. Two rooms 
only have double grades, the fourth and fifth grades, numbering 
thirty-six pupils in one and the seventh and eighth grades with 
thirty-three pupils in the other. The latter are fairly well ac- 
commodated, as the classes are conducted on the departmental 
plan in which the Superintendent acts as teacher, but the former 
are at a decided disadvantage as the fifth grade contains a 
large percentage of backward pupils who need special training 
to bring them to the proper grade. This is impossible in a 
double grade room. Having a class composed of such varying 
grades of intelligence is a detriment to both the backward and 
to the bright pupils as each is a hinderance to the work of the 
other, and the latter cannot advance as fast as they are capable 
owing to the abnormal amount of time required by the former. 
Although the total number of pupils is not large, these two 
grades should be separated in order to accomplish satisfactory 
work. Above the primary grades the time required for a 
recitation depends not so much on the number in the class as 
upon the subject taught. It takes no more time to teach a 
geography or an arithmetic class of thirty than it does a class 
of ten. There is the same amount of ground to be covered 



125 

in either case. But as all the rooms of the present building 
are used we have no way of separating these grades. To 
bring our school to the highest efficiency we need extra rooms. 
We can have under the present limitations a fairly good school 
that will compare favorably with other rural towns, but, if the 
citizens wish the very best for their children, the only way to 
give it to them is to provide for a better grading of the classes. 
This might be accomplished by removing the first and second 
grades to the unused South building, thus leaving room for 
the spreading out of the remaining grades. Such removal need 
in no way complicate the transportation problem. 

As before remarked we have in our upper grammar grades 
many backward children, children whose mental powers have 
not developed much if any beyond the fourth grade, yet these 
have been sent along with the higher classes on account of their 
age and size. It is obvious that they are not deriving all the 
benefit from school instruction that they should, or that they 
could, were we able to devote to them the extra time and atten- 
tion that they need. Class teaching necessarily must be adapted 
to the majority, and the weaklings get only a faint idea of 
what it is all about. It is unwise to hold back in primary 
grades these children of thirteen or fourteen years of age 
physically, but eight years mentally, they are much out of place 
there. Therefore we have the alternative of giving them what 
we can in classes nearer their own physical age, in which most 
of the work is far beyond their comprehension. 

The table below shows the number of pupils by age and 
grade as they were at the beginning of the fall term. The 
numbers immediately below the heavy line are those of normal 
age for the grade, those to the right above the normal. What 
the table does not show is the number of those in the sixth, 
seventh and eighth grades who sit with the grade but are not 
equal to it mentally. 



1 


VO 




CO 


O 

r-H 


lO 




VO 
r-4 


lO> 

i— 1 


CO 
r-H 




CO 
CO 
i-H 


vO 

r-H 


fH 


r-H 


UO 

i— 1 














r-H 


- 


CO 




If} 


<* 

i-H 










r-H 


p— l 


TP 


lO 


l> 


CO 

i-H 


f-H 










« 


CO 


VO 


1 ° 


co 


CO 


i— l 






r-H 




r- 


l> 


CO 


<m 




o 

CKI 


T-4 

f- 1 






i— 1 


rH ■ 


o 

i— i 


r^ 


<M 






i-H 


© 
1— 1 




i— i 


CO 


lO 


to 


■^ 


CO 
l-H 


ON 




CO 


O 

i— i 


T* 


<m 










Os 

i-H 


CO 




r- 


















t- 


o 

r- 1 


CO 
i-H 


<M 














lO 


VO 


•^ 


r-H 


iO 


<N 


<M 


09 

«3 


ed 

o 


i 
1— 1 


■ 

H— 1 
t— 1 


1 

HH 


• 


> 


• 
> 


> 


X 







127 

Our school session extends from 8.45 a. m. to 2 p. m. and it 
goes without saying that all pupils should have a luncheon in 
the meantime, as breakfast must be had in most cases as early 
as seven or seven-thirty. Last year we found the lunch problem 
a difficult one to handle, as we had no place in which the food 
could be eaten. The older pupils did not as a rule bring any- 
thing from home, and those that did ate it at the recess while 
they were playing or standing around in some corner of the 
grounds or basement. Such a method, or rather lack of 
method, was obviously detrimental to health. The first move 
was to get all to bring something for a luncheon, and then to 
provide that it be eaten under proper conditions. Such condi- 
tions were possible only in the class rooms. We now require 
all to spend the first ten or fifteen minutes of the noon inter- 
mission over the luncheon which they spread on their desks, 
the latter being protected by paper napkins. In this way we 
insure a sane and quiet method of partaking of the necessary 
food. About the middle of January we tried the experiment 
of furnishing a cup of hot cocoa with the luncheon. This 
was made possible through the generosity of a few interested 
men who provided funds for the purpose. Children who could 
afford to do so contributed to the fund, and we were able to 
continue the service to all through the cold weather. The results 
were marked in the greater alertness of all during the last 
hour of the session, there being less of that listlessness and lack 
of attention so frequently noticed toward the end of the school 
day. The total cost of the experiment was $104.25. We re- 
newed the same practice this last term on the first of December 
and shall continue as long as the cold weather lasts. Notwith- 
standing the advance of fifty percent in the cost of our raw 
materials, generous friends have guaranteed the amount neces- 
sary. The work is done by the girls of the seventh and eighth 
grades who alternately take charge of the cooking and choose 
their assistants for the serving, so that the burden of the 
work does not fall heavily on any one. 

This was one item of the health problem. The physical 
examination of the children conducted by Dr. Wood developed 



128 



another problem, one that is not so easy of solution. Faulty 
development of figure, defective teeth, enlarged and diseased 
tonsils, adenoids were among the more common defects noted. 
Faults of posture due to unsymmetrical development were 
present in fifty-two percent of the pupils, faults most of which 
are capable of correction in childhood by a proper systematic 
training. The time is undoubtedly coming when we shall give 
as much attention to the training of the bodies of our children 
as we do to those of our thoroughbred horses and dogs. The 
rejection of so many of our young men by the draft boards is a 
sorry commentary on our neglect of physical development. 

We can have as modern and as efficient a school as the citi- 
zens of the town wish, we already have the foundation. If 
they wish a school second to none in the country they can 
have it, but it must be borne in mind that the very best goods 
are not to be had at the bargain counter. A real diamond is 
not to be had for the price of a rhinestone. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles H. Morss, 

Superintendent of Schools. 

January 2, 1920. 



129 



WARRANT 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

MIDDLESEX, S.S. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln in said 
County : 

GREETING : 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you 
are hereby required to notify the legal voters of said Town of 
Lincoln, qualified to vote at Town Meeting for the transac- 
tion of Town affairs, to meet in the Town Hall, in said Lin- 
coln on Monday, the first day of March next at 11 :30 o'clock 
A. M., by posting a copy of this Warrant, by you attested, in 
each of the Post Offices and in some other public place in said 
Town, seven days at least before the first day of March, then 
and there to act on the following Articles : 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot will be open at 
12 o'clock noon and may be closed at 6:30 o'clock P. M. 

ARTICLE 1. To choose a Moderator. 

ART. 2. To bring in their votes for the following Town 
Officers, and any other officers required by law to be elected 



130 

by ballot or otherwise, also any committees, commissioners and 
trustees. 

One Town Clerk for one year. 

One member of the Board of Selectmen for three years. 

One member of the Board of Assessors for three years. 

One member of the Board of Health for three years. 

One Treasurer for one year. 

One Collector for one year. 

Two Constables for one year. 

One Tree Warden for one year. 

One member of the Trust Fund Commissioners for three 
years. 

One member of Trustees for Free Public Lectures for three 
years. 

One member of the School Committee for three years. 

One member of the Board of Water Commissioners for three 
years. 

One member of the Board of Cemetery Commissioners for 
three years. 



131 



Also to vote "Yes" or "No" upon the following question: 
"Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors 
in this Town?" 

ART. 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town Offi- 
cers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

ART. 4. To appropriate money for necessary and expe- 
dient purposes of the Town and enact anything in relation to 
the same. 

ART. 5. To determine the manner of collecting taxes for 
the ensuing year. 

ART. 6. To determine the compensation of the Collector 
of Taxes for the ensuing year. 

ART. 7. To see if the Town will authorize the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow during the muni- 
cipal year, beginning January 1, 1920, in anticipation of the 
collection of taxes for the said year, such sums of money as 
may be necessary for the current expenses of the Town, but 
not exceeding the total tax levy for the said year, giving the 
notes of the Town in payment therefor payable in one year 
from the date thereof. All debts incurred under authority of 
this vote shall be paid from taxes of the present municipal 
year. 

ART. 8. To see if the Town will take any action to pro- 
vide additional school facilities. 

ART. 9. To see if the Town will extend the street lights 
from Blodgett's Corner to Bent's Corner, so called, and ap- 
propriate money therefor. 

ART. 10. To see if the Town will extend the street lights 
from Haynes' Crossing to the Weston line and appropriate 
money therefor. 



132 



HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

And make due return of this Warrant with your doings 
thereon to the Town Clerk at or before the time for the meet- 
ing aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this fourteenth day of February, in 
the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and twenty. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



133 



By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. 

At the Superior Court, within and for the County 
of Middlesex, Anno Domini, 1897. 



The following By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln, in said 
County, are presented to this Court for approval, to wit: — 

"ARTICLE I. 

Town Meetings. 

Section 1. The annual town meeting shall be held on the 
first Monday of March in each year. 

Sect. 2. Notice of every town meeting shall be given by 
posting copies of the warrant calling the same, attested by 
the officer making service thereof, in each of the post-offices 
within the town, and in one of the churches, or one other 
public place, within the town, not less than seven days be- 
fore the day appointed for such meeting. But when, in the 
judgment of the selectmen, the interests of the town require 
a meeting to be held without giving so long a notice, a 
meeting may be called by posting attested copies of the 
warrant in the places above mentioned, and by leaving a 
printed copy thereof at each dwelling-house within the 



134 



town, at least three days before the time appointed for the 
meeting; provided that in such cases the selectmen shall 
certify that, in their opinion, the interests of the town re- 
quire that a town meeting be called upon a notice of less 
than seven days, which certificate shall be made upon, or 
attached to, the original warrant, and shall be served as a 
part thereof. 

ARTICLE II. 

Finances. 

Section 1. The financial year shall commence with the 
first day of February and end with the thirty-first day of 
January annually. 

Sect. 2. The town treasurer shall have the custody of 
all funds belonging to the town except sinking funds, trust 
funds and funds for which other provision is made by law ; 
and he shall pay no money from the treasury except upon a 
draft signed by a majority of the selectmen, stating the 
account to which the same is chargeable. Such draft shall 
be sufficient authority to the treasurer to pay the same, and 
the payment thereof shall discharge him from all liability 
on account of the money so paid. 

Sect. 3. The water commissioners and all other boards, 
committees and officers shall, on the first day of each month, 
pay to the town treasurer all sums collected by them the 
month previous to the custody of which the treasurer is 
entitled. 

Sect. 4. A majority of the water commissioners, school 
committee, or of any board, or committee, and any officer 
having charge of the expenditure of an appropriation, shall 



135 



approve in writing all accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls 
properly chargeable to such appropriation, and shall trans- 
mit the same with his or their approval to the selectmen. 
All other accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls shall be ex- 
amined by the selectmen and, if proper, shall be approved 
by them. The selectmen shall label all accounts, claims, 
bills and pay-rolls which have been approved either by 
themselves or by the other officers before mentioned, and 
shall keep a record thereof in a book kept for the purpose, 
stating the persons to whom payable, the amounts and 
dates thereof, and the funds, or appropriations, from which 
the same are payable. 

Sect. 5. Drafts signed by a majority of the selectmen, 
stating the accounts to which the same are chargeable, 
shall be drawn upon the treasurer for the payment of all 
sums by law payable from the treasury to the common- 
wealth or county, final judgments of courts, bonds, notes, 
and scrip of the town and interest thereon and money pay- 
able to the commissioners of the sinking fund and to the 
trustees of the public library; and also for the payment of 
all accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls which have been 
approved in the manner provided in the previous section. 
Such drafts shall not be negotiated, but shall be transmitted 
by the selectmen directly to the treasurer accompanied by 
the approved bills or other documents for the settlement of 
which the drafts are drawn. 

Sect. 6. The treasurer shall file and safely keep all ap- 
proved and receipted accounts, claims, bills, and pay-rolls, 
and all vouchers, cancelled bonds, notes, scrip, and other 
evidences of indebtedness of the town which have been paid 
from the treasury. 

Sect. 7. No draft shall be drawn by the selectmen unless 
there is sufficient appropriation to pay the same, except for 



136 



sums by law payable to the commonwealth or county, final 
judgments of courts, bonds, notes and scrip of the town and 
interest thereon, and money payable to the commissioners 
of the sinking fund. 

Sect. 8. The selectmen and treasurer respectively shall 
make a record, in a book kept for the purpose, of each ap- 
propriation, with a list of the drafts drawn against such 
appropriation, and shall make a record of all bonds, notes, 
scrip or other evidence of indebtedness of the town, signed 
or countersigned by them. 

Sect. 9. When the bills contracted or approved by any 
board, committee, or officer have exhausted the entire ap- 
propriation for such board, committee or officer, they shall 
incur no further expenditure, except in cases where such 
expenditure may be required by law ; and it shall be the 
duty of each board, committee or officer before the close of 
the financial year to approve all accounts, claims, bills and 
pay-rolls chargeable to their appropriation. During the 
interval between the thirty-first day of January in each 
year and the time of making the next annual appropriations, 
the selectmen, school committee and water commissioners, 
in order to meet the liabilities of their several departments, 
incurred in the carrying on of the work entrusted to them, 
shall have authority to make expenditures and payments 
from the treasury from any available funds therein, and the 
same shall be charged against the next annual appropria- 
tion. Such expenditures and liability incurred for any 
purpose shall not exceed one-fourth the entire amount 
appropriated for that purpose in the previous year. 

Sect. 10. Unless the town shall expressly otherwise vote, 
no extension of water pipes shall be made unless before the 
work of construction is begun one or more of the persons 
whom it is proposed to supply with water by means of such 



137 



extension, shall file with the town clerk a bond with sureties 
satisfactory to the water commissioners, conditioned to pay 
to the town for five years next following the completion of 
such extension and the letting of water into the same, a sum 
sufficient, together with the net annual income from such 
extension, to amount annually to five per centum of the total 
cost thereof. 

ARTICLE III. 

Town Seal. 

Section 1. The design of the town seal shall be: a circle, 
in the border the words "Lincoln. . Incorporated in 1746 as 
a precinct; in 1754 as a Town"; in the center, a shield, in 
the chief or upper part of which on a cross, gules, a fleur- 
de-lis, gold, from the old seal of Lincoln, England, and in 
the base of the shield a view of the present town hall ; crest, 
the old chestnut tree standing upon the common in Lincoln ; 
in saltire two shepherd's crooks ; the device thereof being as 
follows : 

Sect. 2. All deeds and other legal documents made, given 
or entered into by the town requiring a seal shall be sealed 
with the town seal, and signed in behalf of the town by a ma- 
jority of the selectmen. 

Sect. 3. The town clerk shall have the custody of the 
town seal. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Records. 

Section 1. The town clerk shall record in full in a book 
kept for the purpose all written contracts, deeds and other 



138 



instruments to which the town is a party except such instru- 
ments as may by law be recorded in the Registry of Deeds ; 
and it shall be the duty of any board or officer executing or 
receiving such written contract, or other instrument, to 
deliver the same forthwith to the town clerk for the pur- 
pose of record. It shall be the duty of the town clerk to 
see that all conveyances of real estate to the town are prop- 
erly recorded in the Registry of Deeds. 

Sect. 2. The town clerk shall keep a file of all town 
reports, reports of all committees chosen by the town, and 
all original documents relating to the affairs of the town 
which may come into his possession. 



ARTICLE V. 

Books. 

Section 1 . Books, records and laws received by the town 
from the commonwealth shall be deposited in the public 
library building. 

Sect. 2. It shall be the duty of the town officer by whom 
any book mentioned in the preceding section is received, to 
cause the same to be at once deposited in the public library 
building. 

Sect. 3. Such books may be used by the inhabitants of 
the town within such building, and may be taken therefrom 
upon written receipt to the librarian for a period not ex- 
ceeding one day at any one time for use in any town meet- 
ing, or by or before any committee or official of the town. 



139 

ARTICLE VI. 

Suits and Controversies. 

Section 1. The selectmen may compromise claims and 
suits to which the town is a party, provided that they shall 
act upon the advice of counsel when the amount claimed by 
or against the town exceeds $200.00. 

Sect. 2. The selectmen shall have, unless it is otherwise 
voted by the town, full authority as agents of the town to 
institute and prosecute suits or other proceedings in the 
name of the town before any tribunal, to appear and repre- 
sent or defend the town before any tribunal in all suits and 
other proceedings against the town or in which the town 
has an interest, to employ counsel for the purpose aforesaid 
and for other purposes when it may be expedient to do so, 
and to take all necessary and proper measures for the 
protection of the interests and rights of the town. 

Sect. 3. If the town shall, at any meeting called for the 
purpose, choose a committee on claims, such committee shall 
have and exercise exclusively all the powers and duties con- 
ferred upon the selectmen by the two preceding sections. 

ARTICLE VII. 

Reports and Publications by the Town. 

Section 1. The annual reports of the town officers, 
boards and committees shall be prepared in form suitable 
for printing on or before the tenth day of February in each 
year. The selectmen shall cause such reports to be printed 
and distributed to the legal voters of the town seven days 
at least before the annual meeting. 



140 



Sect. 2. The selectmen shall cause to be printed and 
bound each year with the annual reports of the town offi- 
cers, boards and committees, a copy of the records of the 
town meetings during the preceding year; a statement of 
all devices, bequests and donations to the town during the 
preceding year ; a list of all laws of the commonwealth 
accepted by the town during the year; all by-laws adopted 
by the town since the preceding annual report; copies of 
the laying out, alteration, locating anew or discontinuance 
of any highway or townway within the limits of the town 
during the preceding year ; and a statement of all outstand- 
ing bonds, notes and obligations of the town for the pay- 
ment of money. 

Sect. 3. The selectmen shall from time to time cause to 
be printed a sufficient number of copies of the by-laws of 
the town and shall incorporate therewith a list of the laws 
of the commonwealth which have been accepted by the 
town. 



ARTICLE VIII. 

Truants. 

Section 1. Any minor being an habitual truant, and any 
child between the ages of seven and fifteen years found 
wandering about the streets or public places within the town 
having no lawful occupation or business, not attending 
school, and growing up in ignorance, and such children as 
persistently violate the reasonable rules and regulations of 
the public schools, may upon conviction thereof be commit- 
ted to the Middlesex County Truant School at Chelmsford, 
Mass., or to any other place provided by the town within 
its limits, for confinement, instruction, and discipline. 



141 

ARTICLE IX. 

Public Regulations. 

Section 1. No person shall coast upon any public street 
or part thereof after the selectmen have posted a notice 
prohibiting coasting upon such street or part thereof. 

Sect. 2. No person, unless authorized by law, shall 
break or dig up any part of any street without a written 
permit therefor from the selectmen. Every person who 
after obtaining such permit shall obstruct or render unsafe 
any public street, shall guard the same by a proper fence or 
railing, and by lights during the night time, subject to the 
approval of the selectmen. Such permit may be revoked at 
any time. 

Sect. 3. No person shall be or remain in any doorway, 
or upon any stairs, doorstep, portico or other projection 
from any house or building, or upon or against any wall or 
fence on or near any street or public place, after having been 
requested by the owner or any occupant of the premises or 
by any constable or police officer to remove therefrom. 

Sect. 4. No person shall make, write, print, paint, cut or 
post any indecent or obscene marks, words, figures or signs 
upon any fence, building, post, tree or other object exposed 
to public view. 

Sect. 5. No person shall wilfully injure, mar, deface or 
destroy any fence, signboard, guideboard, lamp-post, lamp 
or lantern in any street or public place, nor extinguish any 
street light, nor extinguish or remove any light placed to 
denote an obstruction or a defect in any public street or way, 
without proper authority to do so. 



142 

Sect. 6. Any person who shall offend against any of the 
provisions of this article shall forfeit and pay, for each 
offense, a sum not exceeding twenty dollars." 

Which said By-Laws being seen and understood by the 
Court, are on this nineteenth day of June, A. D. 1897, 
approved. 

In testimony that the foregoing is a true copy 
of record, I hereto set my hand and affix the seal 
of said Court, this twenty-second day of June, 
A. D. 1897. 

RALPH M. SMITH, Ass't Clerk. 



INDEX 



Page 

Town Officers, 1919 3-5 

Proceedings of Town Meetings. 1919 7-25 

Town Clerk's Report . . . 26-29 

Selectmen's Report 30-38 

Town of Lincoln's Honor Roll 33 

Recommendations for Appropriations 35 

Auditor's Report 39 

Expenditures for the year 40-55 

Collector of Taxes 78 

Report of Assessors 79-93 

Treasurer's Report 64 

Report of the Cemetery Commissioners 76 

Report of Town Treasuer in acc't Cemetery Com'ssioners 77 

Report of Commissioner of Sinking Fund 65-66 

Report of Treasurer Commissioners Trust Funds 67-73 

Report of Treasurer Bemis Lecture Fund .... 74-75 

Report of Water Commissioners 95-99 

Report of Inspector of Animals 56 

Report of Fire Engineers 59 

Report of Superintendent of Streets 60-63 

Report of Tree Warden 94 

Report of Board of Health 100 

Report of Trustees of Lincoln Public Library .... 101 

Report of Treasurer of Lincoln Library 102 

Library Statistics 103 

List of Accessions to Library 104—110 

School Reports 113 

Report of School Committee 114 

School Calendar 115 

School Expenditures 120 

Report of Superintendent of Schools 121 

Warrant 1920 129-132 

Bv-Laws of the Town 133-142